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Full text of "Annual report of the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board"

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Public Document 



No. 57 



THIRTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



METROPOLITAN WATER AND 
SEWERAGE BOARD. 



For the Year 1913. 




BOSTON: 

WEIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS, 

32 DERNE STREET. 

1914. 






\ 




\ 









Approved by 
The State Board of Publication. 



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CONTENTS. 



District and to Water 



I. Organization and Administration, 
Board, Officers and Employees, 
II. Metropolitan Water District, 

III. Metropolitan Water Works — Construction, 

IV. Waterworks — Maintenance, . . 

(1) Storage Reservoirs, . 

(2) Aqueducts, . . 

(3) Pumping Stations, . 

(4) Pipe Lines, .... 
, (5) Protection of the Water Supply, 

(6) Forestry, .... 

(7) Wachusett Power Plant, . 

(8) Rainfall and Water Supply, 

(9) Water Consumption, 
V. Water Works — Financial Statement, 

(1) Water Loans — Receipts and Payments, 

(2) Total Water Debt, December 31, 1913, 

(3) Metropolitan Water Loan and Sinking Fund, 

(4) Water Assessment, 1913, .... 

(5) Supplying Water to Cities and Towns outside of 

(6) Expenditures for the Different Works, 

(7) Detailed Financial Statement under Metropolitan Water Act 

(a) Expenditures and Disbursements, 

(b) Receipts, .... 

(c) Assets, ..... 

(d) Liabilities, 
VI. Metropolitan Sewerage Works, . 

(1) North Metropolitan Sewerage System — Construction, 

(2) North Metropolitan Sewerage System — Maintenance, 

(a) Sewers and Pumping Stations, 

(6) Tanneries and Gelatine and Glue Works, . 

(3) South Metropolitan Sewerage System — Maintenance, 

Sewers and Pumping Stations, .... 

VII. Sewerage Works — Financial Statement, .... 

(1) Metropolitan Sewerage Loans, Receipts and Payments, 

North Metropolitan System, ..... 
South Metropolitan System, ..... 

(2) North and South Metropolitan Loan and Sinking Funds, 

(3) Annual Appropriations, Receipts and Expenditures, 

(4) Sewer Assessments, 1913, 

(5) Expenditures for the Different Works, 

(6) Detailed Financial Statement, .. 

(a) Expenditures and Disbursements, 
(fe) Receipts, .... 

(c) Assets, ..... 

(d) Liabilities, .... 
VIII. Recommendations for Legislation, 



Companies 



PAGE 

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38 
39 
39 
39 



Report of Chief Engineer of Water Works, .......... 45 

General Statement, ............. 45 

Organization, .............. 45 



IV 



CONTENTS. 



Report of Chief Engineer of Water Works — Concluded. 
Construction, ...... 

Extension of Works to Hyde Park, . 
Purchase of Works of the City of Boston in the Town of Brookline and City of 
Water Pipe Tunnel under Chelsea Creek, 
Improvement of Beaver Dam Brook, 
Maintenance, . . . 

Rainfall and Yield, . . 

Storage Reservoirs, 

Wachusett Reservoir, 

Wachusett Dam and Grounds, 

Sudbury Reservoir, 

Framingham Reservoirs Nos. 1, 2 and 3, . 

Ashland, Hopkinton and Whitehall Reservoirs, 

Farm Pond, ...... 

Lake Cochituate, ..... 

Miscellaneous Work on Sudbury Watershed, 
Sources from which Water for the Supply of the Metropolitan District has 
Aqueducts, . 

Wachusett, 

Sudbury, 

Cochituate, 

Weston, 

Sewers along Sudbury and Cochituate Aqueduct Lines 
Pumping Stations, 

Chestnut Hill, 

Spot Pond, 

Arlington, 

West Roxbury and Hyde Park, 
Consumption of Water, . 

Metering of Service Pipes, 
Water supplied Outside the Metropolitan District, 
Quality of Water, .... 

Sanitary Inspection. 
Swamp Ditches and Brooks, . 
Protection of the Supply^ by Filtration, 
Forestry, ...... 

Distributing Reservoirs, 

Weston Reservoir, . 

Chestnut Hill Reservoir, 

Waban Hill Reservoir, 

Fisher Hill Reservoir, 

Forbes Hill Reservoir and Standpipe, 

Mystic Reservoir, 

Mystic Lake, . 

Spot Pond, 

Fells and Bear Hill Reservoirs, 
Pipe Yards, . 
Pipe Lines, . 

Fox Hill Bridge, 

Relaying 24-inch Main on Broadway 

Anderson Bridge, 

Connection with Mains of the City of 

Check Valve at Winthrop, 

Miscellaneous, 

Leaks, . 
Meters, 

Recording Gages, , 
Electrolysis, . 

Clinton Sewage Disposal Works, 
Hydro-electric Power Station, 
Engineering, 



in Chelsea, 



Maiden for Emergency Use 



Somerville, 



been 



taken, 



CONTENTS. 



PAGE 

Report of Engineer of Sewerage Works, ........... 100 

Organization, . . . . ... . . . . . . . . 100 

Metropolitan Sewerage Districts, . ... . . . . . . . 100 

Areas and Populations, ............ 100 

Metropolitan Sewers, ... .......... 101 

Sewers purchased and constructed and their Connections, . . . . . . 101 

Construction, .............. 104 

North Metropolitan System, . .... . . . . . . . 104 

Section 68, Winchester, ........... 105 

Section 69, Winchester, # . . . . 106 

Section 70, Winchester and Woburn, ........ 106 

Section 30, Cambridge, . . . . . . . . . . 107 

Section 48a, Somerville, . . . ■ . . . . . . . . 107 

Screening Machinery at East Boston Pumping Station, ..... 108 

Maintenance, . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109 

Scope of Work and Force employed, . . . . . . . .109 

Grade Crossing at Medford Street, Somerville, Fitchburg Division of the Boston & 

Maine Railroad, 109 

Grade Crossing at Orient Heights, Boston, Revere Beach & Lynn Railroad, . . 110 

Deer Island Pumping Station and Dwelling, . . . . . . . .110 

East Boston Pumping Station, . . . . ... . .110 

Charlestown Pumping Station, . . . . . . . . .110 

Alewife Brook Pumping Station, . . . . . . . . . .110 

Shirley Gut Siphon, . . . . . . . . . . .111 

Ward Street Pumping Station, .......... Ill 

Nut Island Screen-house, . . . . .. . . . . .111 

Drainage from Tanneries and Gelatine and Glue Works in Winchester, Woburn and 

Stoneham, ............. Ill 

Data relating to Areas and Populations contributing Sewage to Metropolitan Sewerage 

System, 113 

North Metropolitan System, , . . . . . . . . .113 

South Metropolitan System, . . . . . . . . . . .114 

Whole Metropolitan System, . . . . . . . . . .115 

Pumping Stations, . . . . ... . ' . . . . . 116 

Capacity and Results, . . . . . . . . . . .116 

North Metropolitan System, . . . . ... . .116 

Deer Island Pumping Station, . . . . . . . .116 

East Boston Pumping Station, . . . . . . . .117 

Charlestown Pumping Station, . . . . . . . . 119 

Alewife Brook Pumping Station, . . . . . . . . 120 

South Metropolitan System, ......... 122 

Ward Street Pumping Station, . . . . . . . .122 

Quincy Pumping Station, . . . . . . . . .123 

Nut Island Screen-house, ......... 125 

Quincy Sewage Lifting Station, ........ 125 

Metropolitan Sewerage Outfalls, .......... 127 

Material intercepted at the Screens, . . . . , . . . . 128 



Appendix No. 1. — Contracts relating to the Metropolitan Water Works made and pending dur- 
ing the year 1913, ........ 

Appendix No. 2. — Tables relating to the Maintenance of the Metropolitan Water Works, 

Table No. 1. — Monthly Rainfall in Inches at Various Places on the Metropolitan Water 

Works in 1913 

Table No. 2. — Rainfall in Inches at Jefferson, Mass., in 1913, 

Table No. 3. — Rainfall in Inches at Framingham, Mass., in 1913, . 

Table No. 4. — Rainfall in Inches at Chestnut Hill Reservoir in 1913, 

Table No. 5. — Rainfall in Inches on the Wachusett Watershed, 1897 to 1913, 

Table No. 6. — Rainfall in Inches on the Sudbury Watershed, 1875 to 1913, . 

Table No. 7. — Yield of the Wachusett Watershed in Gallons per Day per Square Mile 

from 1897 to 1913 145 



120 
137 

137 
138 
139 
140 
142 
143 



vi CONTENTS. 



Appendix No. 2 — Continued. 

Table No. 8. — Yield of the Sudbury Watershed in Gallons per Day per Square Mile from 

1875 to 1913, 147 

Table No. 9. — Wachusett System. — Statistics of Flow of Water, Storage and Rainfall 

in 1913, 150 

Table No. 10. — Sudbury System. — Statistics of Flow of Water, Storage and Rainfall in 

1913, 151 

Table No. 11. — Cochituate System. — Statistics of Flow of Water, Storage and Rainfall 

in 1913, . . . . . ... . . . .152 

Table No. 12. — Elevations of Water Surfaces of Reservoirs above Boston City Base at the 

Beginning of Each Month, . . . . . . . .153 

Table No. 13. — Sources from which and Periods during which Water has been drawn for the 

Supply of the Metropolitan Water District, . . . . .154 

Table No. 14. — Average Daily Quantity of Water flowing through Aqueducts in 1913 by 

months, . . . . . . . . . . . 156 

Table No. 15. — Statement of Operation of Engines Nos. 1 and 2 at Chestnut Hill Pump- 
ing Station No. 1 for the Year 1913 157 

Table No. 16. — Statement of Operation of Engine No. 3 at Chestnut Hill Pumping Station 

No. 1 for the Year 1913, - . 158 

Table No. 17. — Statement of Operation of Engine No. 4 at Chestnut Hill Pumping Station 

No. 1 for the Year 1913, 159^ 

Table No. 18. — Statement of Operation of Engines Nos. 5, 6, and 7 at Chestnut Hill 

Pumping Station No. 2 for the Year 1913, 160 

Table No. 19. — Statement of Operation of Engine No. 12 at Chestnut Hill Pumping 

Station No. 2 for the Year 1913, 161 

Table No. 20. — Statement of Operation of Engine No. 8 at Spot Pond Pumping Station 

for the Year 1913, . " . . . ' 162 

Table No 21. — Statement of Operation of Engine No. 9 at Spot Pond Pumping Station 

for the Year 1913, 163 

Table No. 22. — Statement of Operation of Engine No. 10 at Arlington Pumping Station 

for the Year 1913, 164 

Table No. 23. — Statement of Operation of Engine No. 11 at Arlington Pumping Station 

for the Year 1913 165 

Table No. 24. — Statement of Operation of Engines Nos. 13 and 14 at Hyde Park Pumping 

Station for the Year 1913, 166 

Table No. 25. — (Meter Basis) Average Daily Consumption of Water by Districts in Cities 

and Towns supplied by the Metropolitan Water Works in 1913, . . 167 

Table No. 26. — (Meter Basis) Average Daily Consumption of Water in Cities and Towns 

supplied from Metropolitan Works in 1913, ..... 168 

Table No. 27. — (Pump Basis) Consumption of Water in the Metropolitan Water District, 

as constituted in the Year 1913, and a Small Section of the Town of ' 

Saugus, from 1893 to 1913, . . 171 

Table No. 28. — Chemical Examinations of Water from the Wachusett Reservoir, Clinton, 173 
Table No. 29. — Chemical Examinations of Water from the Sudbury Reservoir, . . 174 

Table No. 30. — Chemical Examinations of Water from Spot Pond, Stoneham, . . 175 

Table No. 31. — Chemical Examinations of Water from Lake Cochituate, . . . 176 

Table No. 32. — Chemical Examinations of Water from a Tap at the State House, Boston, 177 
Table No. 33. — Averages of Examinations of Water from Various Parts of the Metropolitan 

Water Works in 1913 178 

Table No. 34. — Chemical Examinations of Water from a Faucet in Boston, from 1892 to 

1913 179 

Table No. 35. — Microscopic Organisms in Water from Various Parts of the Metropolitan 

Water Works, from 1898 to 1913, inclusive, 180 

Table No. 36. — Number of Bacteria per Cubic Centimeter in Water from Various Parts of 

the Metropolitan Water Works, from 1898 to 1913, inclusive, . .182 

Table No. 37. — Colors of Water from Various Parts of the Metropolitan Water Works in 

1913, 182 

Table No. 38. — Temperatures of Water from Various Parts of the Metropolitan Water 

Works in 1913, 183 

Table No. 39. — Temperatures of the Air at Three Stations on the Metropolitan Water 

Works in 1913 184 



CONTENTS. vii 

PAGE 

Appendix No. 2 — Concluded. 

Table No. 40. — Table showing Length of Main Lines of Water Pipes and Connections 
owned and operated by Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board, and 
Number of Valves set in Same, Dec. 31, 1913, ..... 185 
Table No. 41. — Statement of Cast-iron Hydrant, Blow-off and Drain Pipes, owned and 

operated by Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board, Dec. 31, 1913, . 186 
Table No. 42. — Length of Water Pipes, Four Inches in Diameter and Larger, in the Several 
Cities and Towns supplied by the Metropolitan Water Works, Dec. 31, 

1913, 187 

Table No. 43. — Number of Service Pipes, Meters and Fire Hydrants in the Several Cities 

and Towns supplied by the Metropolitan Water Works, . . . 188 

Table No. 44. — Average Maximum Monthly Heights, in Feet, above Boston City Base, to 
which Water rose at Different Stations on the Metropolitan Water Works 

in 1913 189 

Appendix No. 3. — - Water Works Statistics for the Year 1913, ...... 191 

Appendix No. 4. — Contracts relating to the Metropolitan Sewerage Works, made and pending 

during the year 1913,- .......... 194 

Appendix No. 5. — Financial Statement presented to the General Court on Jan. 19, 1914, . 199 

Appendix No. 6. — Legislation of the Year 1913 affecting the Metropolitan Water and Sewer- 
age Board, ........... 204 



Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Boaed. 



To the Honorable the Senate and House of Representatives of the Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts in General Court assembled. 

The Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board, established under 
the provisions of chapter 168 of the Acts of the year 1901, has al- 
ready presented to your Honorable Body an abstract of the account 
of its doings, receipts, expenditures, disbursements, assets and lia- 
bilities for the fiscal year ending on November 30, 1913, and now, 
in accordance with the provisions of chapter 235 of the Acts of the 
year 1906, presents a detailed statement of its doings for the calen- 
dar year ending on December 31, 1913, being its 

THIRTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT. 

I. ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION. 
Board, Officers and Employees. 

The term of office of James A. Bailey, Junior, expired on March 
20, and Charles S. Hamlin was appointed for the term of three years 
next succeeding. Mr. Hamlin resigned on August 1, and on Septem- 
ber 18 Edward A. McLaughlin was appointed for the unexpired 
term, ending March 20, 1916. At the end of the year the Board 
consisted of Henry H. Sprague, chairman, Henry P. Walcott, M.D., 
and Edward A. McLaughlin. William N. Davenport has continued 
as secretary. Alfred F. Bridgman has been the purchasing agent 
and Miss Alice G. Mason the bookkeeper. 

There are also employed in the administrative office a paymaster, 
an assistant in auditing, two general clerks, three stenographers and 
clerks, a telephone operator, a messenger, and a janitor with two 
assistants, one of whom acts as watchman. 

Such general conveyancing work and investigation of real estate 
titles in the different counties as have been called for during the year 
have been performed by George D. Bigelow. 



2 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

The consulting engineers of the Board are Hiram F. Mills and 
Frederic P. Stearns, who are called upon for services when matters 
arise which require their consideration. 

Dexter Brackett, Chief Engineer of the Water Works, has had 
supervision over the various departments of both construction and 
maintenance of the Water Works. William E. Foss has been As- 
sistant to the Chief Engineer. The following have also continued 
as superintendents of departments under the direction of the 
Chief Engineer: Elliot R. B. Allardice, Superintendent of the Wa- 
chusett Department; Charles E. Haberstroh, Superintendent of the 
Sudbury and Cochituate Works and of the portion of the Weston 
Aqueduct above the Weston Reservoir; Samuel E. Killam, Superin- 
tendent in charge of the Weston Reservoir and the remaining portion 
of the Weston Aqueduct, and of all reservoirs and pipe lines within 
the Metropolitan District; and Arthur E. O'Neil, Superintendent 
of the several pumping stations. 

There has been a still further decrease in the number of the en- 
gineering force during the past year. The average force employed 
on construction and maintenance during the year has included, in 
addition to the Chief Engineer, 4 department superintendents, 2 
division engineers, 8 assistant engineers and 27 others in various en- 
gineering capacities and as sanitary inspectors, clerks, stenographers 
and messengers, the total force numbering 42. 

A maintenance force in addition to those engaged in engineering 
capacities, as above mentioned, numbering upon the average during 
the year 241, has been required at the pumping stations, upon reser- 
voirs, aqueducts, pipe lines and upon minor construction work. At 
the end of the year this force numbered 225. 

Frederick D. Smith, Engineer of Sewerage W T orks, has had charge 
of both construction and maintenance of the works. He has been 
assisted by Henry T. Stiff, Division Engineer in charge of the office 
and drafting, by 2 assistant engineers and by 11 others employed in 
different engineering capacities, and by 2 stenographers and clerks. 

The maximum engineering force employed at any one time during 
the year on the construction and maintenance of the Sewerage Works 
was 17. 

The regular maintenance force required in addition for the opera- 
tion of the pumping stations, the care and inspection of the sewers, 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 3 

and for other parts of the Sewerage Works, exclusive of the engineers 
and day-labor forces, has upon the average numbered 167. 

The whole regular force of the Sewerage Department at the end 
of the year numbered 184, of whom the Engineer and 16 assistants 
and draftsmen were engaged in general upon the works, and of the 
remainder, 104 were employed upon the North System and 63 upon 
the South System. 

The maximum number of men employed upon contracts and upon 
day-labor construction on the Sewerage Works during the year was 
for the week ending August 13, when the number amounted to 175. 

II. METROPOLITAN WATER DISTRICT. 

The Metropolitan Water District now comprises the cities of Bos- 
ton, Chelsea, Everett, Maiden, Medford, Melrose, Newton, Quincy 
and Somerville, and the towns of Arlington, Belmont, Lexington, 
Milton, Nahant, Revere, Stoneham, Swampscott, Watertown and 
Winthrop, — in all 9 cities and 10 towns. The District has an area 
of 174.8 square miles, no additional municipalities having been ad- 
mitted into the District during the year. Its population, according 
to the United States Census taken for April 1, 1910, was 1,070,256. 
The population of the District on July 1, 1913, the date upon which 
calculations for the Water Works are based, was estimated as 
1,152,490. 

r 

III. METROPOLITAN WATER WORKS — CONSTRUCTION. 

The total amount expended for the construction and acquisition 
of the Metropolitan Water Works since the passage of the Metro- 
politan Water Act in the year 1895 has been $42,236,743.53. 

The total amount expended during the calendar year on account 
of the construction and acquisition of works has been S200,431.56. 
The details of this expenditure are as follows: on account of the ac- 
quisition of Fisher Hill Reservoir and main water pipes of the city 
of Boston, the sum of $150,000; for the preliminary work on lower- 
ing water pipes in Chelsea Creek, $1,970.51; balance on account of 
the new pumping engine which has been installed at the Chestnut 
Hill pumping station for the southern high-service district, $2,182.61; 
for the laying of a new main to Hyde Park, and on account of the 
construction of the new pumping station, the sum of $32,338.55; 



4 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

for stock on hand, $10,293.44; and for other minor works, engineer- 
ing and administration expenses, the sum of $3,646.45. 

The new pumping station on Hyde Park Avenue in the Hyde 
Park district of the city of Boston was completed and put in service 
in January, 1913, and the use of the West Roxbury pumping station, 
which is owned by the city of Boston and has been operated under 
an arrangement with the city, was discontinued on that date. 

The acquisition by the Board of Fisher Hill Reservoir and the 
large mains previously owned and used by the city of Boston for 
the purpose of conveying water through the town of Brookline and 
the city of Somerville into its own limits, was authorized by chapter 
694 of the Acts of the year 1912, and the sum of $600,000 was ap- 
propriated for the purpose. A taking of the property was made on 
August 20, 1913, and the sum of $150,000 has been paid in full 
settlement therefor. 

In order to permit the dredging of the channel of Chelsea Creek, 
for which Congress has appropriated the sum of $85,000, the Legis- 
lature, by chapter 755 of the Acts of the year 1913, authorized the 
Board to expend the sum of $75,000 for the purpose of lowering the 
water mains now laid across the creek between Chelsea and East 
Boston so far as necessary to secure a channel depth of 25 feet 
below mean low water. Plans have been prepared for the construc- 
tion of a tunnel between vertical shafts, through which a water pipe 
is to be carried across the creek channel at a depth sufficient to 
permit the dredging of a channel 35 feet deep at mean low water. 
The plans have received the approval of the Directors of the Port 
of Boston, and work will be begun as soon as the approval of the 
Secretary of W 7 ar is received. 

The Legislature, by chapter 814 of the Acts of the year 1913, 
authorized the Board to widen, straighten and deepen Beaver Dam 
Brook in the towns of Ashland, Framingham, Sherborn and Natick, 
and appropriated $33,000 for the work, one-third of that sum to be 
repaid by the town of Framingham. Tentative plans have been 
prepared, subject to the examination and approval of the authori- 
ties of the town of Framingham. 

On August 1, 1911, the city of Worcester diverted for its own use 
the water from Asnebumskit and Kendall brooks and the Kendall 
Reservoir in the town of Holden. This action of the city was taken 
under chapter 351 of the Acts of the year 1902, and by the taking the 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 5 

city acquired the right to divert the water from 9.35 square miles of 
watershed which had been tributary to the Wachusett watershed and 
Reservoir. During the past year the city of Worcester has practi- 
cally completed the construction of the Kendall Reservoir and Dam, 
and the whole flow of the brook has been diverted into this reservoir 
since about July 1. The question of the amount to be paid by the 
city to this Board, in payment for the water rights taken, has been 
considered by the City Engineer of Worcester and the Chief Engi- 
neer of the Metropolitan Water Works, acting as arbitrators under 
the terms of the legislative act, but a decision has not yet been 
reached. 

During the year 12.394 acres of land in fee and easements in 3.988 
acres were acquired for the Water Works. 

IV. WATER WORKS — MAINTENANCE. 

The maintenance and operation of the Metropolitan Water Works 
during the past calendar year have required the expenditure of $437,- 
869.82. 

(1) Storage Reservoirs. 

On April 30 the water in the Wachusett Reservoir reached high- 
water mark, elevation 395. Stop-planks were placed on the waste- 
way and the reservoir allowed to rise above high-water mark, the 
maximum elevation of 395.38 being reached on May 31. 

The Sudbury Reservoir, Framingham Reservoir No. 3 and Lake 
Cochituate, from which reservoirs water is discharged into the 
Weston, Sudbury and Cochituate aqueducts, have been kept nearly 
full during the year. 

It has not been necessary to draw water for the supply of the 
Metropolitan District from Framingham Reservoir No. 1, Framing- 
ham Reservoir No. 2, Farm Pond, Ashland, Hopkinton and White- 
hall reservoirs, but water has been discharged from Framingham 
Reservoir No. 1 and Framingham Reservoir No. 2 into Farm Pond, 
from which the town of Framingham obtains indirectly most of its 
supply. 

(2) Aqueducts. 

The Wachusett Aqueduct was in service for the passage of water 
from the Wachusett Reservoir to the Sudbury Reservoir during the 
whole or portions of 288 days. The quantity of water flowing 



6 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



through the aqueduct was equal to an average of 84,997,000 gallons 
per day for the entire year, 92 per cent, being used before its admis- 
sion into the aqueduct for the development of electric energy. 

For distribution to the cities and towns of the Metropolitan Water 
District water was drawn through the Sudbury Aqueduct to the 
Chestnut Hill Reservoir during portions of 364 days, the daily aver- 
age for the whole year being 64,624,000 gallons. 

The Weston Aqueduct was in use during most of the year, the 
quantity of water delivered through the aqueduct being equivalent 
to a daily average of 35,943,000 gallons. 

The Cochituate Aqueduct was used during a portion of the year, 
the quantity of water conveyed from Lake Cochituate to Chestnut 
Hill Reservoir being equivalent to a daily average of 2,425,000 
gallons. 

(3) Pumping Stations. 

During the year 67 per cent, of the water furnished for distribu- 
tion to the Metropolitan Water District was pumped at the two 
Chestnut Hill stations. The remaining 33 per cent, of the water was 
distributed by gravity, this proportion being 2 per cent, greater than 
that of 1912. Other pumping at the Spot Pond, Arlington and 
Hyde Park pumping stations has been required for supplying the 
higher portions of the District. 

The average quantity pumped per day at the Chestnut Hill sta- 
tions was 69,950,000 gallons, at the Spot Pond station 7,126,000 
gallons, at the Arlington station 678,000 gallons and at the Hyde 
Park station 802,000 gallons, a total of 78,556,000 gallons per day. 

The following are the several pumping stations : — 



Number 

of 
Engines. 



Contract 

Capacity per 

Day 

(Gallons). 



Lift (Feet). 



Chestnut Hill High-service station,. . 

Chestnut Hill Low-service station, . 

Chestnut Hill Low-service station, . 

Spot Pond station, . 

Arlington station, . 

Hyde Park station 



66,000,000 

105,000,000 

40,000,000 

30,000,000 

3,000,000 

6,000,000 



138 
60 
130 
125 
290 
140 



The cost of operating the stations was $98,166.39, equivalent to 
$3,424 per million gallons pumped. The total cost is considerably 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 7 

less than for the year 1912, but the cost per million gallons shows 
an increase of $0,226, owing to a reduction in the amount pumped. 
The total amount of coal purchased during the year was 8,788.59 
gross tons, of which 7,327.08 tons were bituminous and 1,461.51 
tons anthracite. Nearly all of the anthracite coal was buckwheat 
and screenings. The cost of bituminous coal delivered in the bins 
at the various stations varied from S3. 87 to $5.15, and the cost of 
anthracite coal varied from $2.50 to $3.09 per ton. 

(4) Pipe Lines. 

During the year the Board acquired from the city of Boston 
14.41 miles of large pipes, nearly all of which are in the city of 
Somerville and the town of Brookline, making the total length of 
pipes controlled and operated by the Board on December 31, 116.10 
miles. The local mains of 4 inches and more in diameter, with which 
the Metropolitan mains are connected for the distribution of water 
to the various municipalities in the District, have a total length of 
1,779.01 miles. 

There were 56 leaks and 3 breaks in the mains during the year, 
the only serious break occurring on December 4 in the 48-inch main 
at the junction of Clinton and Dean roads in Brookline. The pipe 
in which this break occurred was laid by the city of Boston in 1869. 
A piece of pipe containing 31.6 square feet in area was blown out 
and water flowed from the opening for nearly two hours at the rate 
of about 80,000,000 gallons per day, washing away the surface of 
the streets and causing damage to lawns and houses. The repairing 
of the pipe was done by the maintenance force, and it will be neces- 
sary to reseed some of the lawns and relay some of the walks during 
the coming year. 

The work of relaying a portion of the 16-inch water main used in 
supplying the towns of Nahant and Swampscott, where it crosses 
the Saugus River between Saugus and Lynn, was completed on 
June 25. The main is now supported on a concrete shelf, in con- 
nection with the new bridge, for a distance of 200 feet. The expense 
of the changes in the main made necessary by the rebuilding of Fox 
Hill bridge, and imposed by statute upon the Metropolitan Water 
District, is $6,548.56. 

The two 36-inch mains laid under the bed of the Charles River 
between Cambridge and Boston having deteriorated by electrolytic 



8 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

action, it was decided to remove them from the river bed and carry 
them over the river on the Anderson masonry arch bridge now under 
construction. A portion of the work has been done, the amount 
expended to December 31 being $4,951.49. 

(5) Protection of the Water Supply. 

The Marlborough Brook filter-beds, on which is filtered the water 
received from brooks passing through the thickly settled portions of 
Marlborough, have been adequate for the filtration of all the water 
received. 

The Pegan Brook pumping station, at which is pumped upon the 
filter-beds the surface drainage of about one square mile in the 
thickly settled portion of Natick, was in operation 226 days in the 
year. 

The filter-beds which receive for filtration the water flowing 
through the thickly settled portion of the town of Sterling, as well 
as the smaller filter-beds which receive the drainage from a few 
houses near Sterling Junction, the Worcester County Training School 
at West Boylston and from the swimming pool at Southborough, 
have been in successful operation and required only the usual atten- 
tion during the year. 

Studies for the disposal of manufacturing wastes, as well as for the 
disposal of house drainage from the various towns within the drainage 
area of the Metropolitan Water System, have been in progress during 
the year. 

Constant inspection of the watersheds is maintained by the Sani- 
tary Inspector and his assistants and members of the maintenance 
force. 

Chemical examinations of the waters used were made by the State 
Board of Health, and there were in addition microscopical and bac- 
terial examinations made by this Board. These examinations enable 
the Board to take measures to remedy any difficulties which are 
found to exist. 

The high quality of the water which has been supplied to the 
Metropolitan Water District has been maintained, and the results of 
the chemical and bacterial examinations compare favorably with 
those of previous years. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 9 



(6) Forestry. 

During the past ten years about 1,500,000 white pine and spruce 
seedlings have been planted on 1,313 acres of land owned by the 
Board in the vicinity of the Wachusett Reservoir, and there remain 
600 acres on the Wachusett watershed to be planted. It is also 
planned to plant pines on about 800 acres of land in the vicinity of 
the reservoirs on the Sudbury River watershed. The wooded areas 
upon the watersheds have received the attention necessary to pre- 
serve and improve the growth already in existence there. 

The ravages of the gypsy and brown-tail moths and of the elm- 
leaf beetle have continued during the year, requiring a large amount 
of work and considerable expense to protect the trees on lands con- 
trolled by the Board. The egg clusters of the gypsy moth have 
been painted with creosote and nests of the brown-tail moths de- 
stroyed by burning, and extensive spraying has been required for 
the preservation of trees infested by moths and elm-leaf beetles. 

(7) Wachusett Power Plant. 

The hydro-electric power station at the Wachusett Dam has been 
in active operation 276 days, and for a portion of the time power 
has been furnished in excess of the minimum amount required by 
the contract with the Connecticut River Transmission Company. 
The operation of the plant has been entirely successful, the gross 
earnings for the year being $33,096.27. The cost of operating the 
plant has been $8,989.75, the net earnings $24,106.52 and the net 
earnings per thousand kilowatt hours generated, $3.87. 

(8) Rainfall and Water Supply. 

The rainfall is still below the average, though somewhat larger 
than in the preceding year. On the Wachusett watershed the rain- 
fall was 41.22 inches and on the Sudbury watershed 44.31 inches, 
while the averages for the periods covered by the records have been, 
respectively, 45.84 inches and 44.99 inches. 

The Wachusett watershed yielded a daily average of 879,000 gallons 
of water per square mile, and the Sudbury watershed yielded a daily 
average of 733,000 gallons. The Wachusett watershed yielded a 
daily average of 1,081,000 gallons, per square mile, for the 17 years 



10 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

during which measurements have been made, and the daily average 
per square mile from the Sudbury watershed during the 38 years for 
which records have been kept has been 1,000,000 gallons. 

(9) Water Consumption. 

During the year the quantity of water supplied to the Metropoli- 
tan Water District amounted to a daily average of 103,847,700 gal- 
lons, which was equivalent to 94 gallons for each person in the 
District. This quantity was 12,383,000 gallons less than the average 
daily consumption of the preceding year. This decrease is largely 
due to the more general use of meters and the unusually warm 
weather during the winter of 1912-1913. 

Acting under the authority conferred by several statutes and 
arrangements which have been made, water has been supplied to a 
limited extent outside of the Metropolitan Water District. There 
has been drawn from the open channel of the Wachusett Aqueduct 
for the use of the Westborough State Hospital an average daily 
quantity of 167,000 gallons. The town of Framingham has, under 
the provision of the statute, drawn indirectly from Farm Pond an 
average daily quantity of 756,984 gallons and directly from the 
Sudbury Aqueduct 18,356 gallons. A portion of the town of Saugus 
has been supplied through the town of Revere with an average of 
13,000 gallons daily, and the United States Government, for use on 
Peddock's Island, has been supplied with a daily average of 102,100 
gallons. The sums charged for the water thus supplied have 
amounted to $5,134.39. 

V. WATER WORKS — FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 

The financial abstract of the receipts, disbursements, assets and 
liabilities of the Board for the State fiscal year, beginning with De- 
cember 1, 1912, and ending with November 30, 1913, was, in accord- 
ance with the requirements of chapter 235 of the Acts of the year 
1906, presented to the General Court in January last, and a copy of 
this financial abstract is printed as Appendix No. 5. 

As required by said chapter a detailed statement of its doings for 
the calendar year 1913 in relation to the Metropolitan Water Works, 
is herewith presented. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 11 

Construction. 

(1) Water Loans — Receipts and Payments. 

Loans authorized under acts prior to 1913, $42,690,000 00 

Loans authorized under acts of 1913: — 

Chapter 814, Improvement of Beaver Dam Brook, . . 33,000 00 

Chapter 755, Lowering Water Mains in Chelsea Creek, . 75,000 00 

Total loans authorized to January 1, 1914, . . . $42,798,000 00 

Receipts from the sales of property applicable to the construc- 
tion and acquisition of works: - — 
Receipts prior to January 1, 1913, . . . $220,836 14 

Receipts for year ending December 31, 
1913, . . ... . . . 13,341 60 

234,177 74 

Receipt from town of Swampscott for admission to District 

(St. 1909, c. 320), 90,000 00 

Total amount authorized to January 1, 1914, . . . $43,122,177 74 

Amounts approved by Board for payments out of Water Loan 
Fund : — 
Payments prior to January 1, 1913, . $42,036,311 97 
Approved for year ending December 31, 

1913, 200,431 56 

42,236,743 53 

Amount authorized but not expended, January 1, 1914, $885,434 21 

(2) Total Water Debt December 31, 1913. 

.Water Loan Outstanding, Sinking Fund and Debt. 
Bonds issued by the Treasurer of the Commonwealth : — 

Sinking fund bonds (3 and 3| per cent.), .... $41,398,000 00 
Serial bonds (3| per cent.), 390,000 00 

Total bond issue to December 31, 1913, .... $41,788,000 00 

Serial bonds paid prior to January 1, 1913, . $5,000 00 

Serial bonds paid in 1913, 10,000 00 

15,000 00 

Total bond issue outstanding December 31, 1913, . . $41,773,000 00 

Temporary Loan September, 1913, 150,000 00 

Gross Water Debt, $41,923,000 00 

Sinking fund December 31, 1913, 10,767,701 68 

Net Water Debt December 31, 1913, $31,155,298 32 

A decrease for the year of $798,344.88. 



12 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



(3) Metropolitan Water Loan and Sinking Fund, 
December 31, 1913. 



Year. 



Authorized 
Loans. 



Bonds 

issued (Sinking 

Fund). 



Bonds 

issued (Serial 

Bonds). 



Sinking Fund. 



1895, 
1896, 
1897, 
1898, 
1899, 
1900, 
1901, 
1902, 
1903, 
1904, 
1905, 
1906, 
1907, 
1908, 
1909, 
1910, 
1911, 
1912, 
1913, 



$27,000,000 



13,000,000 



500,000 

398,000 
900,000 
80,000 
212,000 
600,000 
108,000 



$5,000,000 
2,000,000 
6,000,000 
4,000,000 
3,000,000 
1,000,000 

10,000,000 
3,500,000 
1,500,000 
2,500,000 
650,000 
1,350,000 



398,000 
500,000 



$200,000 
190,000 



$226,286 05 
699,860 70 
954,469 00 
1,416,374 29 
1,349,332 97 
1,573,619 72 
1,662,426 95 
2,256,803 81 
2,877,835 59 
3,519,602 92 
4,207,045 69 
4,897,822 62 
5,643,575 69 
6,419,283 28 
7,226,262 31 
8,089,902 91 
8,953,437 44 
9,829,356 80 
10,767,701 68 



$42,798,000 



$41,398,000 



$390,000 



(4) Water Assessment, 1913. 

The following water assessment was made by the Treasurer of the 
Commonwealth upon the various municipalities: — 

Sinking fund requirements, $506,812 00 

Serial bonds, 10,000 00 

Interest, 1,427,208 96 

Maintenance : — 

Appropriated by Legislature, . . . $447,000 00 

Less balance on hand, .... 26,376 36 

420,623 64 

Total water assessment for 1913, $2,364,644 60 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



13 



In accordance with chapter 488, Acts of 1895, as amended in 1901, 
1904 and 1906, the proportion to be paid by each city and town is 
based one-third in proportion to their respective valuations and the 
remaining two-thirds in proportion to their respective water con- 
sumption for the preceding year, except that but one-fifth of the 
total valuation and no consumption has been taken for the city of 
Newton, as it has not been supplied with water from the Metropolitan 
works. 

The division of the assessment for 1913 was as follows: — 



Cities and Towns. 


Assessment. 


Cities and Towns. 


Assessment. 


Everett, 

Medford, 

Melrose, 


$20,491 56 

9,042 70 

1 842,127 65 

51,547 66 

49,124 16 

8,267 34 

47,126 88 

27,916 12 

22,684 86 

16,402 68 


Swampscott, . 

Watertown, 


$6,181 89 
6,680 74 
55,519 02 
28,587 67 
116,320 88 
10,213 41 
11,254 35 
19,245 16 
15,909 87 


Milton, 


$2,364,644 60 



(5) Supplying Water to Cities and Towns outside of 
District and to Water Companies. 

Sums have been received during the year 1913 under the provi- 
sions of the Metropolitan Water Act, for water furnished, as fol- 
lows: — 

Town of Framingham, $829 98 

Town of Revere (on account of water furnished to a portion of the 

town of Saugus for 1912), 340 00 

United States Government (for Peddock's Island), .... 2,366 56 

Westborough State Hospital, 1,810 56 

The Snare & Triest Company, 40 27 

$5,387 37 

The sums so received prior to March 23, 1907, were annually dis- 
tributed among the cities and towns of the District, but since that 
date, in accordance with the provisions of chapter 238 of the Acts 
of 1907, the sums so received have been paid into the sinking fund. 



14 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



(6) EXPENDITUEES FOR THE DIFFERENT WORKS. 

The following is a summary of the expenditures made in the vari- 
ous operations for the different works: — . 



Construction and Acquisition of Works. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1913. 



Administration applicable to all parts of the construction and acquisition of 
the works, . . . . . . . . . . . . 

Wachusett Department real estate, 

Beaver Dam Brook improvement, ......... 

Distribution system: — 
Low service: — 

Pipe lines and connections, . . 

Lowering pipe at Chelsea Creek, 

Southern high service: — 

Pipe lines and connections, 

Section 39 (Hyde Park connection), . . . . . 

Pumping station, Chestnut Hill, 

Southern extra high service: — 
Hyde Park connection: — 

Section 40, 

Section 41, * . 

Hyde Park Pumping Station, 

Weston Aqueduct supply mains, 

Stock — pipes, valves, castings, etc., purchased and sent first to storage yards, 
and later transferred, as needed, to the various parts of the work: — 

Amount received, 

Transferred from storage yards to the various sections of the work and in- 
cluded in costs of special works, . 

Acquisition of existing water works, city of Boston, 

Legal and expert expenses 



Amount charged from beginning of work to January 1, 1913, 

Total for construction and acquisition of works to January 1, 1914, 



$190 30 
1,970 51 



10 78 
1,553 49 
2,182 61 



571 73 

818 06 

29,395 27 

416 85 



$2,875 93 

9 00 

118 59 



37,109 60 



$12,386 34 
2,092 90 


10,293 44 
150,025 00 


$150,000 00 
25 00 






$200,431 56 
42,036,311 97 


$42,236,743 53 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



15 



Maintenance and Operation. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1913. 



Administration, 
General supervision, . 
Taxes and other expenses, 
Wachusett Department: — 

Superintendence, . 

Reservoir, .... 

Forestry, .... 

Protection of supply, 

Buildings and grounds, . 

Wachusett Dam, 

Wachusett Aqueduct, 

Clinton sewerage system : — 
Pumping station, 
Electric plant, 
Sewers, screens and filter-beds, 

Sanitary inspection, 

Swamp drainage, . 

Power plant, .... 



Sudbury Department: — 

Superintendence, Framingham office, ..... 
Ashland Reservoir, . . . . . 

Hopkinton Reservoir, 

Whitehall Reservoir, 

Framingham Reservoirs Nos. 1, 2 and 3, 

Sudbury Reservoir, 

Lake Cochituate, 

Marlborough Brook filters 

Pegan filters, , 

Sudbury and Cochituate watersheds, 

Sanitary inspection, 

Cochituate Aqueduct, . 

Sudbury Aqueduct 

Weston Aqueduct, 

Improving Lake Cochituate, 

Forestry, 

Improvement and protection of water supplies, . 
Protection of water supply in aqueducts, .... 

Distribution Department: — 

Superintendence, 

Arlington pumping station, pumping service, 

Chestnut Hill Low-service pumping station, pumping service, 

Chestnut Hill High-service pumping station, pumping service, 

Spot Pond pumping station, pumping service, 

West Roxbury pumping station, pumping service, 

Hyde Park pumping station, pumping service, . 

Arlington standpipe, 

Bear Hill Reservoir 

Amounts carried forward, 



$10,190 79 
8,487 04 
16,285 23 
2,761 05 
6,004 33 
4,256 15 
3,928 43 

2,031 38 
1,034 12 
3,972 65 
1,281 71 
3,226 11 
6,014 75 



11,151 44 
1,567 14 
1,645 23 
744 35 
6,934 79 
7,850 09 
4,776 88 
2,439 99 
3,454 95 
2,361 23 
3,624 50 
4,153 59 
6,831 93 
5,843 04 
1,117 12 
4,122 03 
3,204 58 
4,990 61 



$4,395 19 

8,370 16 

49,227 94 

21,801 00 

15,180 12 

1,605 29 

7,646 73 

85 22 

283 93 



S15.S30 80 
34,870 50 
40,114 63 



69,473 74 



76,813 49 



$108,595 58 $237,103 16 



16 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Maintenance and Opeeation. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1913. 



Amounts brought forward, ..... 

Distribution Department — Con. 
Chestnut Hill Reservoir and grounds, . 

Fells Reservoir . 

Forbes Hill Reservoir, 

Mystic Lake, conduit and pumping station, 

Mystic Reservoir, 

Waban Hill Reservoir, 

Weston Reservoir, 

Spot Pond, 

Buildings at Spot Pond, 

Pipe lines: — 

Low service, . . . . • 

Northern high service, ..... 

Northern extra high service, .... 

Southern high service, ..... 

Southern extra high service, 

Supply pipe lines 

Buildings at Chestnut Hill Reservoir, . 

Chestnut Hill pipe yard 

Glenwood pipe yard and buildings, 

Stables, 

Venturi meters, 

Measurement of water, . . . 
Arlington pumping station, buildings and grounds, 
Hyde Park pumping station, buildings and grounds, 
Fisher Hill Reservoir 

Total for maintaining and operating works, 



$108,595 58 $237,103 16 



9,911 92 


602 94 


1,083 03 


1,447 74 


1,039 01 


234 54 


2,695 73 


7,418 01 


746 07 


29,653 12 


7,600 01 


181 28 


5,518 82 


481 89 


1,737 05 


5,499 45 


1,594 69 


3,745 52 


7,284 19 


865 33 


1,574 82 


351 94 


135 81 


768 17 200,766 66 


$437,869 82 



(7) Detailed Financial Statement under Metropolitan 

Water Act. 

The Board herewith presents, in accordance with the requirements 
of the Metropolitan Water Act, a detailed statement of the expendi- 
tures and disbursements, receipts, assets and liabilities for the year 
1913. 

(a) Expenditures and Disbursements. 

The total amount of the expenditures and disbursements on ac- 
count of construction and acquisition of works for the year beginning 
January 1, 1913, and ending December 31, 1913, is $200,431.56, 
and the total amount from the time of the organization of the Met- 
ropolitan Water Board, July 19, 1895, to December 31, 1913, is 
$42,236,743.53. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



17 



For maintenance and operation the expenditures for the year 
were $437,869.82. 

The salaries of the commissioners, and the other expenses of ad- 
ministration, have been apportioned to the construction of the works 
and to the maintenance and operation of the same, and appear under 
each of those headings. 

The following is a division of the expenditures according to their 
general character : — 



Genekal Character of Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1913. 



Construction. 



Preliminary work, advertising, 



Construction of Works and Acquisition by Purchase or Taking. 

Administration. 
Commissioners, . 
Secretary and auditor, 
Clerks and stenographers, 
Traveling, .... 
Stationery and printing, . 
Postage, express and telegrams, 

Telephone, lighting, heating, water and care of building 
Rent and taxes, main office, 
Miscellaneous expenses, 

Engineering. 
Chief engineer and department engineers, 

Principal assistant engineers 

Engineering assistants, 

Inspectors 

Architects, 

Railroad and street car travel, ...... 

Engineering and drafting supplies, 

Telephone, lighting, heating, water and care of buildings: 

Main office 

Sub-offices, 

Rent and taxes, main office, ...... 

Miscellaneous expenses, . . . 



Contracts, Distribution System: — 
T. H. Corrigan, for furnishing and placing loam at the Hyde Park Pumping 

Station, 

Florence Iron Works, cast-iron water pipes and special castings, 

Holly Manufacturing Co., high-service pumping engine at Chestnut Hill, 

A. Varnerin Co., for building the superstructure of Hyde Park pumping 

station . . 

Amounts carried forward, 



$791 67 
750 00 
745 83 

25 00 
234 46 

30 00 
140 98 
128 69 

29 30 



$128 21 


1,056 22 


1,813 52 


180 00 


25 00 


10 56 


11 50 


423 06 


17 98 


386 10 


15 40 



$2,810 00 

12,11.") 34 

1,769 00 

3,630 50 



•$2,875 93 



4,067 55 



5 40 



$20,325 44 



$6,948 S8 



IS 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



General Character op Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1913. 



Amounts brought forward, . . . . . . . . 

Construction — Con. 
Contracts, Distribution System — Con. 
Warren Brothers Co., for constructing artificial stone walks at Hyde Park 

pumping station, 

Laidlaw-Dunn-Gordon Co., for furnishing two pumping engines for Hyde 
Park pumping station, 

Additional work: — 

Labor, 

Freight and express, 

Jobbing and repairing, . . . . . . - 

Tools, machinery, appliances and hardware supplies, 

Electrical supplies, 

Castings, ironwork and metals, 

Iron pipe and valves, 

Paint and coating, 

Lumber and field buildings, 

Drain pipe, 

Brick, cement and stone, 

Sand, gravel and filling, .......... 

Unclassified supplies, ... 

Miscellaneous expenses, . . . . . . . 

Real Estate. 
Legal and expert: — 

Conveyancer and assistants, 

Conveyancing supplies, 

Settlements made by Board, . 

Judgments, 

Purchase of Existing Water Works. 

Legal and expert services, p 

Settlement, 



Amount charged from beginning of work to January 1, 1913, 

Total amount of construction expenditures to January 1, 1914, 



),325 44 



16,948 88 



475 00 




11,683 20 






$32,4S3 64 




$4,288 36 




104 12 




12 00 




1,280 41 




513 68 




1,139 38 




1,213 91 




93 00 




78 76 




8 00 




1,240 99 




137 66 




264 70 




193 73 






10,568 70 




$2 00 




7 00 




171 34 




225 00 






405 34 


$25 00 


150,000 00 






150,025 00 






$200,431 56 




42,036,311 97 


. $42,236,743 53 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



19 



General Character op Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1913. 



- Maintenance and Operation op Works. 
Administration: — ■ 

Commissioners, 

Secretary and assistants, ...... 

Rent, 

Repairs of building, 

Fuel, 

Lighting, 

Care of building, 

Postage, 

Printing, stationery and office supplies, . 

Telephones, 

Traveling expenses, 

Miscellaneous expenses, • . 

General supervision: — 

Chief engineer and assistants, 

Rent, 

Repairs of building 

Fuel, 

Lighting, 

Care of building, 

• Postage, 

Printing, stationery and office supplies, . 

Telephones, 

Traveling expenses, . 

Miscellaneous expenses, . . . . 

Pumping service: — 

Labor, 

Fuel, . T . . . 

Oil, waste and packing, 

Repairs, 

Small supplies, 

Rent, .' 

Reservoirs, aqueducts, pipe lines, buildings and grounds: — 

Superintendents, 

Engineering assistants, 

Sanitary inspectors, 

Labor, pay roll, 

Labor, miscellaneous, . .... . . . 

Alterations and repairs of pumping stations, 

Alterations and repairs of other buildings and structures, . 

Automobiles, 

Brick 

Amounts carried forward, ....... 



$5,200 32 


7,486 82 


614 88 


5 27 


47 75 


44 40 


454 63 


188 50 


1,371 84 


104 41 


112 32 


199 66 


1 1=; cfift 80 


$27,862 73 


1,844 70 


238 21. 


143 28 


133 20 


1,364 17 


106 00 


871 65 


432 46 


596 34 


1,277 76 $34,870 50 


$62,400 87 


35,303 60 


1,371 96 


2,740 04 


1,239 72 


775 05 


$10 L 9°! t 




$7,175 00 


11,027 52 


3,354 55 


150,411 61 


7,517 85 


4,582 38 


1,663 72 


10,325 81 


411 10 



$196,469 54 $154,532 54 



» 



20 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



General, Character of Expenditures. 



Amounts brought forward, 



Con. 



Reservoirs, aqueducts, pipe lines, buildings and grounds 
Brooms, brushes and janitor's supplies, 
Castings, ironwork and metals, 
Cement and lime, . 
Drafting and photo supplies, 
Fertilizer and planting material, 
Freight and express, 
Fuel, 

Gypsy moth supplies, 
Hardware, 
Hay and grain, 
Lighting, 
Lumber, . 
Machinery, 
Paints and oils, 
Pipe and fittings, 
Postage, . 

Printing, stationery and office supplies, 
Rubber and oiled goods, 
Stable expenses, 
Sand, gravel and stone, 
Traveling expenses, 
Telephones, 
Teaming, 

Tools and appliances, 
Vehicles, harnesses and fittings, 
Miscellaneous expenses, . 
Contracts : — 

The W. P. Leavitt Sons Co., repairing roof of lower gate-house at Wachu- 
sett Dam, contract 30-M, 

Power Equipment Co., electric motor and centrifugal pump for the 
Clinton Sewerage pumping station, contract 25-M, .... 



Payments in lieu of taxes, 



Total expenditures for maintenance and operation, 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1913. 



S196.469 54 $154,532 54 



243 31 
9,620 81 

763 34 

144 92 
1,184 69 

623 16 
2,168 36 
2,502 46 
1,175 91 
2,031 66 

238 94 
4,063 21 

772 74 
1,344 78 
1,822 85 

110 71 

642 03 
1,003 33 

704 67 

818 76 
2,466 34 
1,065 13 

864 60 
1,669 23 

444 28 
6,206 80 



1,100 00 
956 09 



243,222 65 
40,114 63 

§437,869 82 



(6) Receipts. 

The total amount of receipts from the operations of the Board 
and from sales of property for the year beginning January 1, 1913, 
and ending December 31, 1913, is $67,081.88 and the total amount 
from the time of the organization of the Metropolitan Water Board, 
July 19, 1895, to December 31, 1913, is $941,731.69. The general 
character of these receipts is as follows: — 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



21 



General Character of Receipts. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1913. 



Applicable to the loan fund : — 

Land and buildings, 

Construction tools, supplies and reimbursements, 

Applicable to payment of interest, sinking fund requirements and expenses of 
maintenance and operation: — 
Proceeds from operations of the Board : — 

Rents (from February 1, 1913), 

Land products (from February 1, 1913), 

Electric energy, 

Maintenance labor, tools, supplies and reimbursements, .... 
Interest and unclassified receipts (from February 1, 1913), 

Applicable to the sinking fund : — 
Water supplied to cities and towns, water companies and others (from March 

22, 1907), . . . • . 

Rents (prior to February 1, 1913), 

Land products (prior to February 1, 1913), . . . ... 

Unclassified receipts and interest (prior to February 1, 1913), 



Amount credited from beginning of work to January 1, 1913, 
Total receipts to January 1, 1914, 



$27 00 
13,314 60 



SI, 586 83 
8,027 06 

31,704 44 

6,449 62 

115 75 



$5,387 37 

298 50 

164 10 

6 61 



$13,341 60 



47,883 70 



5,856 58 



$67,081 88 
874,649 81 

$941,731 69 



The foregoing receipts have been credited to the various objects 
or works, as follows : — 



Sources op Receipts. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1913. 



Supplying water outside of Water District, 

Construction and acquisition of works: -— 
Administration, 
Wachusett Dam, 
Wachusett Reservoir, 
Wachusett Aqueduct, 
Weston Aqueduct, . 
Sudbury Reservoir, 
Distribution system, 
Diversion of water, Clinton sewerage system 
Purchase of existing water works, . 



Amount carried forward, 



$22 90 

159 85 

172 91 

2 59 

145 14 

39 52 

12,741 40 

55 19 

25 00 



$5,387 37 



13,364 50 



$18,751 87 



22 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Sources of Receipts. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1913. 



Amount brought forward, 



Maintenance and operation of works: 
Administration, . 
General supervision, 
Wachusett Aqueduct, 
Wachusett Reservoir, 
Electric power plant, 
Sudbury system, .... 
Distribution system, . . ,. 
Clinton sewerage system, 



Amount credited from beginning of work to January 1, 1913, 
Total receipts to January 1, 1914, .... 



$108 67 
733 39 
215 28 

7,429 37 
31,775 94 

2,367 86 

5,356 00 
343 50 



$18,751 87 



48,330 01 

$67,081 88 
874,649 81 

$941,731 69 



(c) Assets. 

The following is an abstract of the assets of the Water Works, a 
complete schedule of which is kept on file in the office of the Board : — 

Office furniture, fixtures and supplies; engineering and scientific instruments 
and supplies; police supplies; horses, vehicles, field machinery, etc.; ma- 
chinery, tools and other appliances and supplies; completed works, real 
estate and buildings connected therewith. 

(d) Liabilities. 
The sums due on monthly pay rolls amount to $1,443.73, and 
there are bills for current expenses which have not yet been received. 

Amounts on Monthly Estimates, not due until Completion of Contracts or until 

Claims are settled. 



Name. 


Work. 


Amount. 


Camoia & Williams, .... 
De Vincenzi & Baruffoldi, . 
Joseph Hanreddy, . 
Laidlaw-Dunn-Gordon Co., 


Contract 283, Stillwater improvement, Wachusett 
Reservoir. 

Contract 308, Section 33 of northern high-service 
pipe lines, Distribution System. 

Contract 322, Section 36 of northern extra high- 
service pipe lines, Distribution System. 

Contract 314, Section 7 of the Weston Aqueduct 
Supply Mains. 

Contract 346, for furnishing two pumping engines 
for the southern extra high-service pumping 
station at Hyde Park, Boston, Mass. 


$778 09i 

200 00 

100 00 

10 00 

1,725 50 



1 Held pending settlement of claims on account of this contract. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 23 

Claims have been made by the following parties for land taken 
and other damages, and suits are now pending in court for the deter- 
mination of many of them : — 

Patrick Bradley, Henry F. Keyes, James E. Welch, Byron D. 
Allen, J. Frank Wood et ah, Asa Knight, Edward F. Merriam, 
Sanford C. Kendall, estate of William H. Vickery, James H. and 
Hannah S. Wood, Francis W. M. Goodale, John Ward et al., heirs 
of George K. Ward. 

VI. METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE WORKS. 

The North Metropolitan Sewerage District embraces the cities of 
Cambridge, Chelsea, Everett, Maiden, Medford, Melrose, Somerville 
and Woburn, and the towns of Arlington, Belmont, Revere, Stone- 
ham, Wakefield, Winchester and Winthrop, and parts of the city of 
Boston and the town of Lexington, — comprising in all 9 cities and 
8 towns, with an area of 90.50 square miles. The district has an 
estimated population, based upon the United States Census of 1910, 
as of December 31, 1913, of 570,490. Of the total population it is 
estimated that 89.4 per cent., or 510,040 people, contribute sewage 
to the North Metropolitan System. 

The South Metropolitan Sewerage District includes the cities of 
Newton, Quincy and Waltham, and the towns of B.rookline, Milton 
and Watertown, and parts of the city, of Boston and the town of 
Dedham, — a total of 4 cities and 4 towns. This district has an 
area of 100.87 square miles, with an estimated population as of 
December 31, 1913, of 393,390. According to the estimates made 
66.9 per cent, of this population, or 262,990, contribute sewage to 
the South Metropolitan System. 

(1) North Metropolitan Sewerage System — Construction. 

The amount expended for construction on account of the North 
Metropolitan System during the past year was $223,567.76. 

The construction of the new Mystic sewer, authorized by the Leg- 
islature of 1912, has been in progress during the year. Section 67 
has been completed. Contracts for constructing Sections 68, 69 and 
70 have been awarded and, with the exception of Section 69, are 
nearly completed. The masonry work on Section 68 was completed 
in December, and there only remains a small amount of grading and 
surfacing to finish the work on this section. The contract for Sec- 



24 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

tion 69 was let on December 31, and the work will be prosecuted 
during the coming year. On Section 70 about 300 feet remain to 
be constructed. The construction of these sections will complete 
the sewer authorized by the Legislature. 

The addition to the screen-house of the East Boston pumping sta- 
tion has been completed and one set of screens installed. The work 
of changing the old screen-chamber to fit the new conditions is now 
in progress, and the remaining set of screens will be in operation 
early in the coming year. 

The Legislature, by chapter 377 of the Acts of the year 1913, 
authorized the construction of an additional sewer in Boston Avenue, 
Somerville, for the purpose of conveying the sewage from a part of 
Medford across a small portion of Somerville. No appropriation 
was made for this work as there was sufficient balance in construc- 
tion funds to cover the expense. The work has been completed and 
the sewer placed in service. 

Arrangements were made early in the year with the President and 
Fellows of Harvard College to relocate and construct a portion of 
Section 30 of the North Metropolitan System. The proposed loca- 
tion of certain dormitories for the use of the college included land 
through which the sewer had been originally constructed, and in 
order to relocate the same so that there would be no interference 
either with the sewer or buildings, a new location was selected and 
the sewer rebuilt accordingly, the expense of the relocation and con- 
struction being borne by the college authorities. 

The Board acquired by taking easements in 2.471 acres of land 
in Winchester and Woburn for the construction of the new Mystic 
sewer, and in 0.184 of an acre in Cambridge for the relocation of 
part of Section 30. 

(2) North Metropolitan Sewerage System — Maintenance. 

U The cost of the maintenance and operation of the North Metropol- 
itan System during the past year has been $170,133.69. 

(a) Sewers and Pumping Stations. 
The Metropolitan sewers in the North Metropolitan System now 
extend a distance of 62.467 miles, and the local sewers which are 
connected with the Metropolitan sewers have a further length of 
715.69 miles, involving 76,433 connections. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



25 



The sewage of the North Metropolitan District flows at first by 
gravity, but before being finally disposed of is lifted at different 
points by pumping and is finally discharged into the harbor from 
an outfall off Deer Island. 

The daily average amount of sewage discharged into the harbor 
was 56,600,000 gallons, a daily average for each person contributing 
sewage of 111 gallons. The increase in the total amount of sewage 
discharged was 900,000 gallons per day more than the discharge of 
the preceding year. The maximum rate of discharge in any one 
day was 148,700,000 gallons. 

The pumping stations operated for the North Metropolitan Sewer- 
age System are as follows : — 



Number 

of 
Engines. 



Contract 

Capacity per 

Day 

(Gallons). 



Lift (Feet). 



Deer Island station (Boston harbor), 
East Boston station 

Charlestown station, . 

Alewife Brook station (Somerville), . 



235,000,000 
235,000,000 

104,000,000 

22,000,000 



19 

19 

fll 



13 



There were purchased for the operation of the pumping stations 
7,525.283 tons of bituminous coal, the average prices of which, at the 
different stations, varied from $4.15 to $4.69 per gross ton delivered 
in the bins. 

The cost of operating the stations was $113,647.10. The average 
cost per million gallons of sewage lifted per foot at the several sta- 
tions was $0,147, an increase of about 9 per cent, over the cost last 
year, due to the increase in the amount paid for labor. 



(b) Tanneries and Gelatine and Glue Works. 

A portion of the maintenance force has been employed in the over- 
sight and care of the Mystic valley sewers which receive the sewage 
and waste material discharged from the tanneries and other manu- 
factories in Winchester, Woburn and Stoneham. Under the require- 
ments of the Board all the tanneries and other manufactories have 
installed settling tanks in which the most objectionable matter is 



26 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



deposited before the contents are allowed to enter the sewers. The 
semi-sludge removed from these tanks for disposal elsewhere 
amounted in the year to about 5,017 cubic yards. 

(3) South Metropolitan Sewerage System — Maintenance. 
The entire cost of maintenance of the South Metropolitan System 
during the past year has been $101,668.59. 



Sewers and Pumping Stations. 

The Metropolitan sewers in the South Metropolitan System, 
which comprise the old Charles River valley sewer and Neponset 
River valley sewer, as well as the new High-level sewer and exten- 
sion, have a total length of 43.42 miles, and with these are con- 
nected local sewers having a length of 592.07 miles, involving 37,916 
connections. 

The pumping stations operated for the South Metropolitan Sewer- 
age System are as follows : — 





Number 

of 
Engines. 


Contract 

Capacity per 

Day 

(Gallons). 


Lift (Feet). 


Ward Street station (Roxbury District), .... 
Quincy sewerage lifting station, 


2 
3 
2 


100,000,000 

18,000,000 

3,000,000 


45 
23 
20 





The sewage of two small districts in Dorchester and Milton, in- 
cluded in the Neponset River valley system, which are too low for 
sewage to be delivered into the High-level sewer by gravity, is, under 
an arrangement with the city of Boston, disposed of through the 
Boston Main Drainage Works at Moon Island. By this arrangement 
the Board is relieved from the expense of providing extra pumping 
facilities. 

A large part of the sewage of the District is lifted into the 
High-level sewer at the Ward Street pumping station in Roxbury. 
Most of the sewage of the city of Quincy is pumped into the High- 
level sewer at Greenleaf Street near the Quincy pumping station. 
The entire sewage is screened at the Nut Island screen-house for the 
purpose of intercepting solid matter, and is thence discharged at the 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 27 

bottom of the harbor from the two outfalls about a mile off from 
the island. 

The daily average amount of sewage thus discharged was 53,020,- 
000 gallons, and the largest rate of discharge in a single day was 
during a heavy storm when the amount reached 152,000,000 gallons. 
The increase in the daily average from last year was 4,820,000 gal- 
lons. The daily average discharge of sewage for each individual 
contributing sewage in the district was 202 gallons. 

There were 3,118.609 gross tons of bituminous coal purchased at 
the two pumping stations and screen-house, the average prices of 
which varied from $4.45 to $4.65 per gross ton delivered in the bins. 

The total amount expended for the operation of the stations was 
$59,134.90. 

VII. SEWERAGE WORKS — FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 

The financial abstract of the receipts, expenditures, disbursements, 
assets and liabilities of the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board 
for the fiscal year of the Commonwealth ending with November 
30, 1913, was, as stated in connection with the Water Works, pre- 
sented to the General Court in January, in accordance with the 
requirements of chapter 235 of the Acts of the year 1906, and a 
copy of this financial abstract is in part printed as Appendix No. 5. 

The following statement of its financial doings, in relation to the 
Metropolitan Sewerage Works, for the calendar year 1913 is here- 
with presented, in accordance with the provisions of the act of 1906, 
as a part of the annual report of the Board. 

(1) Metropolitan Sewerage Loans, Receipts and Payments. 

The loans authorized for the construction of the Metropolitan 
Sewerage Works, the receipts which are added to the proceeds of 
these loans, the expenditures for construction, and the balance avail- 
able on January 1, 1914, have been as follows: — 



28 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

North Metropolitan System. 

Loans authorized under various acts prior to 1913 for the con- 
struction of the North Metropolitan System and the various 

extensions, . . ' $7,013,865 73 

Receipts from sales of real estate and from miscellaneous sources 

which are placed to the credit of the North Metropolitan 

System: — 

For the year ending December 31, 1913, . $9,735 20 

For the period prior to January 1, 1913, . 75,444 12 

$85,179 32 

$7,099,045 05 
Amount approved for payment by the Board x out of the Metro- 
politan Sewerage Loan Fund, North System: — 
For the year ending December 31, 1913, . $223,567 76 

For the period prior to January 1, 1913, . 6,739,995 82 

6,963,563 58 



Balance, North Metropolitan System, January 1, 1914, . $135,481 47 

South Metropolitan System. 

Loans authorized under the various acts, applied to the con- 
struction of the Charles River valley sewer, Neponset valley 
sewer, High-level sewer and extension, constituting the South 

Metropolitan System, $8,867,046 27 

Receipts from pumping, sales of real estate and from miscella- 
neous sources, which are placed to the credit of the South Met- 
ropolitan System : — - 

For the year ending December 31, 1913, . $76 75 

For the period prior to January 1, 1913, . 14,004 60 

14,081 35 



,881,127 62 



Amount approved by the Board * for payment out of the Met- 
ropolitan Sewerage Loan Fund, South System: — 

On account of the Charles River valley sewer, $800,046 27 
On account of the Neponset valley sewer, . 911,531 46 
On account of the High-level sewer and ex- 
tension : — 
For the year ending Decem- 
ber 31, 1913, . . . $2,095 76 
For the period prior to Jan- 
uary 1, 1913, . . . 7,108,913 67 

7,111,009 43 



8,822,587 16 

Balance, South Metropolitan System, January 1, 1914, . $58,540 46 

1 The word "Board" refers to the Metropolitan Sewerage Commission and the Metropolitan Water 
and Sewerage Board. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



29 



(2) North and South Metropolitan Loan and Sinking Funds, 

December 31, 1913. 





Year. 




Loans. 


Bonds issued 
(Sinking Fund). 


Bonds 

ISSUED 

(Serial 
Bonds). 


Sinking 
Fund. 




North 
System. 


South 
System. 


North 
System. 


South 

System. 


North 
System. 


North and 

South 
Systems. 


1889, . . . ■ ,. 


$5,000,000 00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1890, 








- 


- 


$2,200,000 


$800,000 


- 


- 


1891, 








- 


- 


368,000 


- 


- 


- 


1892, 








- 


- 


1,053,000 




- 


- 


1893, 








- 


- 


579,000 


- 


- 


- 


1894, 








500,000 00 


- 


500,000 


- 


- 


- 


1895, 








300,000 00 


$500,000 00 


300,000 


300,000 


- 


- 


1896, 








30,000 00 


- 


30,000 


200,000 


- 


- 


1897, 








85,000 00 


300,000 00 


80,000 


300,000 


- 


- 


1898, 








215,000 00 


35,000 00 


220,000 


35,000 


-. 


- 


1899, 








- 


4,625,000 00 


. 


1,025,000 


- 


$361,416 59 


1900, 








265,000 00 


10,912 00 1 


265,000 


10,912 


- 


454,520 57 


1901, 








- 


40,000 00 


- 


2,040,000 


- 


545,668 26 


1902, 








- 


- 


- 


864,000 


- 


636,084 04 


1903, 








500,000 00 


1,000,000 00 


500,000 


1,736,000 


- 


754,690 41 


1904, 








- 


392,000 00 


- 


392,000 


- 


878,557 12 


1905, 








- 


- 




- 


- 


1,008,724 95 


1906, 








55,000 00 


1,175,000 00 


55,000 


175,000 


- 


1,146,998 6S 


1907, 








- 


- 


- 


300,000 


- 


1,306,850 30 


1908, 








413,000 00 


- 


- 


700,000 


- 


1,492,418 98 


1909, . 








- 


- 


300,000 


- 


- 


1,673,784 40 


1910, 








56,000 00 


- 


113,000 


- 


- 


1,931,741 89 


1911, 








6,000 00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2,184,674 98 


1912, . 








378,000 00 


- 


- 


- 


$62,000 


2,458,541 20 


1913, 








- 


- 


- 


- 


378,000 


2,749,337 90 




$7,803,000 002 


$8,077,912 00 
« 


- 


- 


- 






789,134 27 


789,134 27 


- 


- 


- 












$7,013,865 73 


$8,867,046 27 


$6,563,000 


$8,877,912 


$440,000 





1 The sum of $10,912 was appropriated to reimburse the town of Watertown for the expense of con- 
structing the Watertown siphon. 

2 Of this amount $789,134.27 was expended for the construction of the Charles River valley sewer 
which is now included in the South Metropolitan System. 



30 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



(3) Annual Appropriations, Receipts and Expenditures. 

The annual appropriations for the maintenance of the Metropoli- 
tan Sewerage Works, the receipts of the Board which are added to 
the appropriations for maintenance, and the expenditures for main- 
tenance for the year ending December 31, 1913, have been as fol- 
lows: — 

North Metropolitan System. 

Appropriation under chapter 352 of the Acts of 1913, . . . $170,600 00 
Receipts from pumping and from other sources, .... 572 91 



$171,172 91 
Amount approved by the Board for payment, 170,133 69 



Balance, January 1, 1914, $1,039 22 

South Metropolitan System. 

Appropriation under chapter 351 of the Acts of 1913, . . $109,460 00 
Receipts from pumping and from other sources, . . . 159 28 



$109,619 28 
Amount approved by the Board for payment, .... 101,668 59 



Balance, January 1, 1914, $7,950 69 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



31 



(4) Sewer Assessments, 1913. 
The following sewer assessments were made by the Treasurer of 
the Commonwealth upon the various municipalities: — 

North Metropolitan Sewerage System. 

Sinking fund requirements, $117,915 00 

Serial bonds, 2,742 40 

Interest, 224,314 62 

Maintenance : — ■ 

Appropriated by Legislature, .... $170,600 00 

Less balance on hand, . . . . . . 1,809 37 

— 168,790 63 

Total North Metropolitan sewerage assessment, . , $513,762 65 

South Metropolitan Sewerage System. 

Sinking fund requirements, . . . $73,757 00 

Interest, . 303,275 28 

Maintenance : — 

Appropriated by Legislature, .... $109,460 00 

Less balance on hand, ...... 4,491 41 

104,968 59 



Total South Metropolitan sewerage assessment, . . $482,000 87 

In accordance with the provisions of chapter 369, Acts of 1906, 
the proportion to be paid by each city and town to meet the interest 
and sinking fund requirements for each year is based upon their 
respective taxable valuations, and to meet the cost of maintenance 
and operation upon their respective populations. 

The divisions of the assessments for 1913 were as follows: — 

North Metropolitan Sewerage System. 



Cities and Towns. 


Assessment. 


Cities and Towns. 


Assessment. 


Arlington, 


$14,547 74 


Melrose, 


$17,103 24 


Belmont, 












8,274 66 


Revere, . 










18,396 39 


Boston, . 












85,278 83 


Somerville, 










69,725 37 


Cambridge, 












111,944 92 


Stoneham, 










5,659 41 


Chelsea, . 












28,507 06 


Wakefield, 










10,751 56 


Everett, . 












30,500 51 


Winchester, 










13,871 08 


Lexington, 












4,766 98 


Winthrop, 










13,830 69 


Maiden, . 












42,221 69 
25,571 59 


Woburn, 
Total, 










12,810 93 


Medford, 


$513,762 65 



32 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



South Metropolitan Sewerage System. 



Cities and Towns. 


Assessment. 


Cities and Towns. 


Assessment. 


Boston, . . 

Brookline, 

Dedham, 

Hyde Park, l 


$222,170 43 
93,828 71 
11,049 18 

22,403 21 


Newton, ..... 

Quincy, 

Waltham 

Watertown, 

Total, 


$61,282 25 
29,948 08 
26,360 93 
14,958 08 


Milton, 


$482,000 87 



1 Included in Boston. 



(5) Expenditures for the Different Works. 
The following is a summary of the expenditures made in the vari- 
ous operations for the different works : — 



Construction and Acquisition op Works. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1913. 



North Metropolitan System. 
North System, enlargement: — 

Administration, . . 

East Boston pumping station, extensions and additions, 

New Mystic sewer, 

Saratoga Street culvert, East Boston, .... 
Relocation part of section 30, Cambridge, ■ . 
Section 48A, Somerville and Medford, . . 
Section 57A, Revere Extension, . .... 

Amount charged from beginning of work to January 1, 1913, 

Total for North Metropolitan System to January 1, 1914, 

South Metropolitan System. 



High-level sewer, ........ 

High-level sewer extension : — 

Administration, 

Section 80, day work, West Roxbury and Brookline, . 

Section 85, Brighton, . . . . 



Amount charged from beginning of work to January 1, 1913, 
Total for South Metropolitan System to January 1, 1914, 
Total for construction, both systems, 



$5,317 90 

15,972 03 

191,251 04 

270 68 

8,872 13 

1,828 98 

55 00 



$223,567 76 
6,739,995 82 

$6,963,563 58 



$1,236 53 



$721 48 

1 20 

136 55 



859 23 



$2,095 76 
8,820,491 40 

$8,822,587 16 

$15,786,150 74 



No. 57.]- 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



33 



Maintenance and Operation. 


For the Year ending 
December 31, 1913. 


South Metropolitan System, 


101,668 59 


Total for maintenance, both systems, ....... 


. $271,802 28 



(6) Detailed Financial Statement. 

The Board herewith presents, in accordance with the Metropolitan 
Sewerage acts, an abstract of the expenditures and disbursements, 
receipts, assets and liabilities for the year ending December 31, 
1913: — 

(a) Expenditures and Disbursements. 



General Character of Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1913. 



Construction of Works and Acquisition by Purchase or Taking. 

North Metropolitan System. 
Administration: — 
Commissioners, ........ 

Secretary, 

Clerks and stenographers, 

Traveling, ......... 

Stationery, printing and office supplies, 

Telephone, lighting, heating, water and care of building, 

Rent and taxes, main office, 

Miscellaneous expenses, . . * 



Engineering: — 

Chief engineer, 

Engineering assistants, . 

Inspectors, - 

Traveling expenses, ....<... 

Stationery, printing and office supplies, 
Engineering and drafting instruments and tools, 
Engineering and drafting supplies, .... 
Telephone, lighting, heating, water and care of building, 

Rent and taxes 

Miscellaneous expenses, 



Advertising, 

Labor and teaming 

Tools, machinery and appliances, 

Brick, cement, lumber and other field supplies and expenses. 



Amount carried forward, 



52,333 33 

750 00 

1,341 00 

11 00 

393 28 

234 79 

214 50 

40 00 



$956 42 

8,302 68 

5,704 56 

624 64 

522 60 

91 60 

155 05 

700 68 

643 50 

546 27 



$197 63 
5,099 59 
1,835 64 
4,831 94 



$5,317 90 



18,248 00 



11,961 80 



$35,530 70 



34 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub, Doc. 



General Character of Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1913. 



Amount brought forward, 



North Metropolitan System — Con. 
Contracts: — 
Coleman Brothers, contract 99, for constructing Section 67 (New Mystic 

sewer) of the North Metropolitan Sewerage System in Medford and 

Winchester, 

J. E. Locatelli Co., Inc., contract 100, extension of screen-house for the East 

Boston pumping station, 

New England Structural Co., contract 101, for furnishing two sets of screens 

for the East Boston pumping station, 

William J. Barry, contract 102, for building relocation of part of Section 30, 

Cambridge, 

Ross & Barbaro, contract 103, for constructing Section 70 (New Mystic 

sewer) of the North Metropolitan Sewerage System in Winchester, 
G. M. Bryne Co., contract 104, for constructing Section 68 (New Mystic 

sewer) of the North Metropolitan Sewerage System in Winchester, 
Antony Cefalo, contract 105, for constructing Section 48A in Somerville and 

Medford, 



Real estate: — 
Legal, conveyancing and expert, 
Settlements, .... 



Total for North Metropolitan System, 



South Metropolitan System. 

High-level Sewer. 
Engineering: — 
Engineers, inspectors, rodmen, laborers and others, 
Repairs, fittings and supplies, main office, . 
Rent of office, Ashburton Place, .... 
Land takings, purchase and recording, 
Legal services, . . . ... 



High-leiel Sewer Extension. 
Administration: — 

Commissioners, 

Clerks and stenographers, 

Stationery, printing and office supplies, 

Telephone, lighting, heating, water and care of building, 

Rent and taxes, main office, 

Miscellaneous expenses, 



Engineering: — 
Telephone, lighting, heating, water and care of building, 
Rent and taxes 



Total for South Metropolitan System, 



583,821 17 
4,700 00 
5,842 00 
7,754 56 
23,637 20 
59,372 05 
1,397 53 



$202 55 
1,310 00 



$265 00 


48 80 


47 73 


850 00 


25 00 


1 
$416 67 


185 33 


69 58 


29 24 


16 66 


4 00 


$87 75 


50 00 



3,530 70 



186,524 51 



1,512 55 



$223,567 76 



$1,236 53 



721 48 



137 75 



$2,095 76 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



35 



General Character of Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1913. 



Maintenance and Operation of Works. 
North Metropolitan System. 
Administration: — 

Commissioners, . 

Secretary and assistants, 

Rent, 

Heating, lighting and care of building, 

Postage, 

Printing, stationery and office supplies, 

Telephones, 

Traveling expenses, 

Miscellaneous expenses, 

General supervision: — 
Chief engineer and assistants, ..... 

Rent, . . . 

Heating, lighting and care of building, 

Postage, 

Printing, stationery and office supplies, 

Telephones 

Traveling expenses, 

Miscellaneous expenses, 

Deer Island pumping station: — 

Labor . . . 

Fuel, 

Oil and waste, 

Water, 

Packing, 

Repairs and renewals, 

Telephones, . 

General supplies, . . . , 

Miscellaneous supplies and expenses, .... 

East Boston pumping station: — 

Labor, 

Fuel, 

Oil and waste, 

Water, 

Packing, 

Repairs and renewals, . 

Telephones 

General supplies, 

Miscellaneous supplies and expenses, . . . . 

Charlestown pumping station: — 

Labor, 

Fuel, 

Oil and waste, 

Amounts carried forward, ...... 



$2,333 33 




2,351 99 




228 80 




214 49 




58 00 




601 32 




41 03 




30 67 




49 78 






$5,909 41 




$4,725 89 




686 40 




643 55 




20 00 




197 63 




123 10 




110 00 ' 




1 86 






6,508 43 


$17,784 26 


13,837 88 




512 75 




1,513 20 




183 30 




1,137 47 




18 30 




991 00 




49 33 






36,007 49 




$23,403 10 




14,046 07 




590 58 




2,163 36 




83 82 




1,463 92 




6 15 




1,519 98 




48 92 






43,325 90 




$16,659 61 




4,255 12 




218 93 




$21,133 66 


$91,751 23 



36 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



General Character of Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1913. 



Amounts brought forward, ..... 

North Metropolitan System — Con. 
Charlestown pumping station — Con. 
Water, 
Packing, . 

Repairs and renewals, 
Telephones, 
General supplies, . 
Miscellaneous supplies and expenses, 



Alewife Brook pumping station: 
Labor, 
Fuel, 

Oil and waste, 
Water, 
Packing, . 

Repairs and renewals, 
Telephones, 
General supplies, . 
Miscellaneous supplies and expenses, 

Sewer lines, buildings and grounds: — 
Engineering assistants, . 

Labor, 

Automobiles, . . . . 
Brick, cement and lime, 
Castings, ironwork and metals, 
Freight, express and teaming, 
Fuel and lighting, .... 
Jobbing and repairing, . 

Lumber, 

Machinery, tools and appliances, . 
Paints and oils, .... 
Rubber and oiled goods, 
Sand, gravel and stone, . 

Telephones, 

Traveling expenses, 

General supplies, .... 

Miscellaneous expenses, . 



Horses, vehicles and stable account, 

Total for North Metropolitan System, 

South Metropolitan System. 
Administration: — 

Commissioners, 

Secretary and assistants, 

Rent, 

Amount carried forward, . . 



1,133 66 $91,751 23 



589 20 
44 91 

466 39 
48 69 

623 06 

113 62 



18,322 25 

2,106 64 

226 81 

207 72 

21 86 

194 34 

39 29 

164 62 

10 65 



$3,575 00 

30,760 50 

188 54 

250 05 

1,034 13 

2 30 

25 72 

156 12 

887 90 

514 39 

723 92 

429 93 

94 95 

25 60 

470 20 

734 48 

19 30 



$2,333 33 

2,086 17 

214 50 



23,019 53 



11,294 18 



39,893 03 
4,175 72 

$170,133 69 



$4,634 00 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD, 



07 
Oi 



General Character of Expenditures. 



Amount brought forward, 



South Metropolitan System — Con. 
Administration — Con. 

Heating, lighting and care of building, 

Postage, 

Printing, stationery and office supplies, 

Telephones, 

Traveling expenses, .... 

Miscellaneous expenses, .... 



General supervision: — 
Chief engineer and assistants, 

Rent, . 

Heating, lighting and care of building, 

Postage, 

Printing, stationery and office supplies, 

Telephones, 

Traveling expenses, .... 

Ward Street pumping station: — 
Labor, 
Fuel, 

Oil and waste, 
Water, 
Packing, . 

Repairs and renewals, 
Telephones, 
General supplies, . 
Miscellaneous supplies and expenses, 

Quincy pumping station: — 
Labor, 
Fuel, 

Oil and waste, 
Water, 
Packing, . 

Repairs and renewals, 
Telephones, 
General supplies, . 
Miscellaneous supplies and expenses, 



Nut Island screen-house: — 
Labor, .... 
Fuel, 

Oil and waste, 
Water, .... 
Packing, .... 
Repairs and renewals, 

Amounts carried forward, 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1913. 



u,m 00 



190 64 
21 00 

379 40 
46 64 

9 00 

42 28 



5,069 51 
643 50 
571 98 
34 00 
133 19 
139 91 
115 00 



$22,388 55 

10,565 53 

249 40 

1,389 60 

188 80 

1,770 12 

60 08 

1,003 05 

359 46 



57,920 82 

1,610 32 

69 27 

223 20 

41 59 

205 80 

34 73 

374 25 

68 51 



a.7,966 16 

1,702 40 

71 18 

315 66 

15 86 

40 87 



$5,322 96 



4,707 



37,974 59 



10,548 49 



A. 10,1 12 13 $58,553 13 



38 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



General Character of Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1913. 



Amounts brought forward, ..... 

South Metropolitan System — Con. 
Nut Island screen-house — Con. 

Telephones 

General supplies, 

Miscellaneous supplies and expenses, 



Sewer lines, buildings and grounds: — 
Engineering assistants, . 

Labor, 

Automobiles, .... 
Brick, cement and lime, 
Castings, ironwork and metals, 
Freight, express and teaming, 
Fuel and lighting, . 
Jobbing and repairing, . 

Lumber, 

Machinery, tools and appliances, 
Paints and oils, 
Rubber and oiled goods, 
Sand, gravel and stone, . 
Telephones, .... 
Traveling expenses, • 

General supplies, . 
Miscellaneous expenses, . 



City of Boston, for pumping and interest, 
Horses, vehicles and stable account, 

Total for South Metropolitan System, 



),112 13 



41 28 

448 41 

10 00 



$3,651 92 

16,820 28 

331 01 

246 00 

170 29 

1 31 

121 35 

6 00 

369 97 

219 74 

167 44 

192 22 

99 77 

33 00 

229 75 

156 16 

75 72 



5,553 13 



10,611 82 



22,891 93 
6,423 73 
3,187 98 

$10l',668 59 



(b) Receipts. ' 

The receipts from the sales of property, from rents and from other 
sources, have been credited as follows: — 



Account. 



For the 

Year ending 

December 31, 

1913. 



Construction: — 

North Metropolitan System 

South Metropolitan System, 

Maintenance: — ■ 

North Metropolitan System, . . 

South Metropolitan System, _ . _ 

Metropolitan Sewerage Loans sinking fund, 

Amount credited from beginning of work to January 1, 1913, 
Total receipts to January 1, 1914, .... 



),735 201 
76 75 

572 91 

159 28 

65 79 



$10,609 93 
109,551 37 



$120,161 30 



1 Includes the sum of $9,280.26, being amount received from Harvard College, in reimbursement for 
construction of the relocation of part of Section 30 in Cambridge. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



19 



(c) Assets. 

The following is an abstract of the assets of the Sewerage Works, 
a complete schedule of which is kept on file in the office of the 
Board : — 

Office furniture, fixtures and supplies; engineering and scientific instruments 
and supplies; horses, vehicles, field machinery, etc.; machinery, tools and 
other appliances and supplies; completed works, real estate connected there- 
with. 

id) Liabilities. 

The sums due on monthly pay rolls amount to $784.32 and there 
are bills for current expenses which have not yet been received. 

Amounts on Monthly Estimates, not due until Completion of Contracts or until 

Claims are settled. 





Name. 


Work. 


Amount. 


High-level Sewer: — 
National Contracting Co., 
E. W. Everson & Co., 

High-level Sewer Extension: — 
Timothy J. O'Connell, 

North Metropolitan Construction: — 
William J. Barry, .... 

G. M. Bryne Co., .... 
Antony Cefalo, ..... 
Ross & Barbaro, .... 


Section 73, contract abandoned, .... 
Section 75, contract 14, 

Section 82, in part, contract 57, . 

Relocation part of Section 30, Cambridge, con- 
tract 102. 
Section 68, New Mystic sewer, contract 104, 
Section 48A, contract 105, ..... 
Section 70, New Mystic sewer, contract 103, . 


$5,516 17i 
1,000 00 

60 00 

408 13 

5,183 30 

246 62 

2,994 82 



1 Damages claimed by the Commonwealth on account of the abandonment of the contract exceed 
this amount. 

Claims have been made by the following parties for land taken 
and other damages, and suits are now pending in the courts for the 
determination of many of them : — 

Anna L. Dunican, Carrie S. Urquhart, N. Jefferson Urquhart, 
Edwin N. Urquhart, Richard Jones, James Doherty, Michael Niland, 
William H. Gibbons, Francis Normile, Boston & Maine Railroad, 
Esther Cutting, Fred W. Joy et al., David N. Skillings, John S. 
Lynam, Antonio Piluso. 



VIII. RECOMMENDATIONS FOR LEGISLATION. 
In the abstract of the annual report for the year 1913 the Board 
recommended that authority be given to construct a 24-inch pipe 
from the terminus of the 36-inch main at River Street in Dorchester 



40 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

through Milton and Quincy for a distance of about 13,000 feet, a 
reinforced concrete reservoir on Bellevue Hill in the city of Boston, 
a 20-inch force main leading to the reservoir, a power plant at the 
Sudbury Dam in Southborough and an extension of the sewerage 
outfall at Deer Island. The statement of the Board is as follows: — 

" The southern high-service district is supplied with water pumped 
from Chestnut Hill Reservoir and stored in reservoirs on Fisher Hill 
in Brookline and Waban Hill in Newton. The district embraces 
the higher portions of the city of Boston, including Beacon Hill and 
the business portion of the city lying north of Washington Street 
between Boylston and Court streets, the portions of Roxbury, Dor- 
chester and West Roxbury lying west of Dudley and Stoughton 
streets, the Hyde Park district of the city of Boston, the city of 
Quincy and the towns of Milton, Watertown and Belmont. The 
population supplied is approximately 332,000 and the daily average 
consumption for the past year was 29,870,000 gallons, with a weekly 
maximum of 33,650,000 gallons and a weekly minimum of 28,200,000 
gallons. The available storage in the reservoirs named is 23,000,000 
gallons, or 70 per cent, of the daily consumption during the weeks 
of maximum use. The city of Quincy and the town of Milton are 
located about ten miles from the pumping station and storage reser- 
voirs and are supplied through a single line of pipes. The town of 
Milton has no local storage. In the city of Quincy there are two 
standpipes having a combined capacity of 755,000 gallons, and the 
Forbes Hill Reservoir, which may be used in case of emergency, 
with a capacity of 5,100,000 gallons. 

" Since the city of Quincy was first supplied from the Metropolitan 
Water System the population of the city has increased from 23,000 
to 35,500, and the daily average consumption from 1,370,000 to 
2,700,000 gallons. The main supplying water to Quincy is also used 
to supply a considerable portion of the Dorchester, West Roxbury 
and Hyde Park districts of Boston and the town of Milton, and in 
both Dorchester and West Roxbury there has been a large increase 
in population during the past few years. As a result of the increased 
draft from the main, the pressure in Quincy is at times of greatest 
use reduced so low that the local standpipe has been several times 
emptied and the supply in the standpipe on Forbes Hill greatly re- 
duced, and as there is but one main available for the supply of 
Quincy and Milton these municipalities are dependent in case of 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 41 

accident on the water stored in Forbes Hill Reservoir. In February, 
1913, this main broke, and before it could be restored to service the 
quantity stored in the reservoir had been reduced to 1,500,000 gal- 
lons, sufficient to supply the city for but six to eight hours. 

" The Board deems it desirable that another 24-inch pipe should be 
laid from the terminus of the 36-inch main at River Street in Dor- 
chester through the town of Milton and the city of Quincy for a 
distance of 13,000 feet, to provide increased pressure and an addi- 
tional means of supply. The cost of this 24-inch pipe and laying 
of the same is estimated at $72,000. 

" The southern extra high-service water district embraces portions 
of the West Roxbury and Hyde Park districts of the city of Boston 
and the town of Milton which are above the elevation which can 
be adequately supplied with water from the high-service reservoirs 
on Fisher and Waban hills. 

" Previous to January, 1913, water for the supply of the district 
was pumped at a small station in West Roxbury owned by the city 
of Boston and operated by the Board under an arrangement with 
the city, and raised to the standpipe on Bellevue Hill, which has 
a capacity when full of 135,000 gallons. The pumping station and 
the standpipe were built in 1885, and the station has been operated 
since 1899 by the Board. The portion of the town of Milton sup- 
plied by the southern extra high service was added in 1902 and 
Hyde Park in 1912. 

" In January, 1913, the new station at Hyde Park was completed 
and its operation commenced and the station at West Roxbury was 
abandoned; but the small standpipe on Bellevue Hill is still the sole 
reliance for storing water for the use of the whole district in case 
of any accident to the pumping machinery. As the water .stored 
in the standpipe, even when full, will supply the district for only 
a few hours, more storage is desirable both for domestic use and for 
protection in case of fire. 

1 The Board is of opinion that the construction of a reinforced con- 
crete reservoir, having a capacity of 2,300,000 gallons, is necessary 
to meet the requirements of the district, the reservoir to be located 
on the summit of Bellevue Hill, on land set apart by the city of 
Boston for park purposes, covered by a reinforced concrete roof, 
surrounded by a wall of Quincy granite, forming a tower which can 
be made easily accessible to the public. The reservoir will provide 



42 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

storage sufficient to supply the whole district for more than two 
days, and will permit of a more economical operation of the pump- 
ing station,. 

"In connection with the construction of the reservoir it will be 
desirable to extend the existing 20-inch force main from the corner 
of Beach and Poplar streets to the reservoir, a distance of 5,600 
feet. The cost of the reinforced concrete reservoir and tower is 
estimated at $75,000, and the extension of the 20-inch force main 
to the reservoir at $27,000, a total of $102,000. 

" Preliminary estimates have been made of the amount which would 
be required for a plant for the production of electric power at the 
Sudbury Dam, located in the town of Southborough, and the various 
questions arising, as to the production of power and the means and 
opportunity for its disposal when manufactured, have been investi- 
gated. Whether electric power produced at this dam can be dis- 
posed of at prices sufficient to insure the Commonwealth against 
loss in the operation is in part dependent upon the valuation of the 
power plant for local taxation. 

" The Board is of opinion that favorable arrangements can be made 
for the construction of the plant and its proper operation, and that 
an appropriation should be authorized which can be used for such 
construction if the power can be sold at a fair profit. Several pos- 
sible purchasers are so situated that, if arrangements can be made 
with any of them, power would have to be transmitted but a short 
distance from the dam to reach the plant of the purchaser. 

' Until an appropriation is made for the construction of the plant 
the Board will not be in a position to attempt to make any arrange- 
ments with would-be purchasers, and consequently the Board be- 
lieves that an appropriation should be made this year, to be used 
only in case further examination of the proposed work shows that 
the plant can be operated at a profit to the Commonwealth. 

"The amount estimated for the construction of the power plant 
at the dam is $80,000. 

" The Legislature of 1912, by chapter 694 of the acts of that year, 
appropriated the sum of $600,000 for the purchase of certain prop- 
erty from the city of Boston. The property in question has been 
acquired by the Commonwealth, the amount paid therefor being 
$150,000, leaving a balance of $450,000 undisposed of. 

"The Board recommends that authority be given to issue bonds, 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 43 

from time to time as may be required, for the above purposes to a 
total amount not exceeding $254,000, to be taken from said balance 
of $450,000, and that authority be given to expend said sum of 
$254,000 for the following purposes : — 

For a 24-inch main from River Street in Dorchester, through Milton 

toQuincy, $72,000 

For a reinforced concrete reservoir on Bellevue Hill in Boston, . 75,000 

For a 20-inch force main to the reservoir on Bellevue Hill, . . 27,000 

For a power plant at the Sudbury Dam, ...... 80.000 



$254,000 



" Complaints regarding the disposal of the sewage at the Deer Island 
outfall have been made, and in November of last year a letter was 
received from the Department of Commerce of the United States, 
stating that the present location 'near the Deer Island Lighthouse 
is a menace to the health of the keepers and a detriment to the 
maintenance of the station.' The department requested information 
regarding a possible extension of the outfall to a point where the 
running tide could 'carry off the effluvia and decrease the deposits 
on the base of the tower and the adjacent rocks.' 

" In order to determine what could be done to remedy the alleged 
objectionable conditions, and render the discharge of the sewage 
unobjectionable in the future, the Board has had careful investiga- 
tions made by competent engineers who have advised extending the 
present outfall sewer, by means of cast-iron pipe, directly out to the 
deep water of the channel, a distance of 333 feet. The Board ap- 
proves of this method and believes that by carrying out the plan 
proposed there will be no disagreeable odor at the water surface at 
any stage of the tide. 

" The amount estimated to extend the outfall as suggested and pur- 
chase material therefor is 125,000, divided as follows: — 

260 tons of cast-iron pipe ranging from 5 to 7 feet in diameter, at 
$75 a ton, $19,500 

For laying pipe and furnishing all materials except the pipe, doing 
all necessary work of protecting the outfall, removing part of the 
existing outfall and making connections with the present sewer, . 87,000 

Add for engineering and contingencies, 18,500 

$125,000 



44 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

u The Board recommends that authority be given to issue from time 
to time bonds denominated on the face thereof Metropolitan Sewer- 
age Loan, to an amount not exceeding $125,000, to be expended for 
the extension of said outfall as outlined'." 

Towards the close of the year 1913 the chairman of the Board, 
Hon. Henry H. Sprague, was absent by reason of illness and con- 
sequently does not sign the above report. Early in January Mr. 
Sprague resigned and thus closed a connection with the work which 
has existed since the organization of the Metropolitan Water Board 
in June, 1895, at which time he was appointed chairman, a position 
which he held until the abolition of that Board in 1901. On March 
20 of that year the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board was 
created and Mr. Sprague designated as chairman, which position he 
held until his resignation. His associates upon the Board cannot 
allow this period of devoted, unselfish and highly honorable service, 
both to himself and to the Commonwealth, to pass without making 
this simple record of their appreciation of its value. 

The detailed reports of the Chief Engineer of the Water Works 
and of the Engineer of the Sewerage Works, with various tables and 
statistics, are herewith presented. 

Respectfully submitted, 

henry p. walcott, 
edward a. Mclaughlin, 

Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board. 
Boston. February 21, 1914. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



45 



EEPOET OF CHIEF ENGINEEE OF WATEE WOEKS. 



To the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board. 

Gentlemen : — The following is a report of the work done under 
the charge of the Chief Engineer of the Metropolitan Water Works 
for the year ending December 31, 1913. 

General Statement. 

The Chief Engineer has charge of the design and construction of 
all new works, and of the maintenance and operation of all the works 
controlled by the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board for sup- 
plying water to the eighteen municipalities which have received 
their supply from the Metropolitan Works. 



Organization. 
The Chief Engineer has had the following assistants : 



William E. Foss, 
Elliot R. B. Allardice, 

Charles E. Haberstroh, 

Samuel E. Killam, . 

Arthur E. O'Neil, . 
Alfred 0. Doane, 



Clifford Foss, . 
Benjamin F. Hancox, 

James W. Killam, 

William E. Whittaker, 
Charles E. Livermore, 
William W. Locke, 



Assistant to Chief Engineer. 

Superintendent of Wachusett De- 
partment. 

Superintendent of Sudbury Depart- 
ment. 

Superintendent of Pipe Lines and 
Reservoirs, Distribution Depart- 
ment. 

Superintendent of Pumping Stations, 
Distribution Department. 

Division Engineer, specially in charge 
of engineering work at pumping 
.stations. 

Assistant Engineer. 

Assistant in charge of Drafting De- 
partment. 

Assistant Engineer, in charge of tests 
of coal and oil. 

Office Assistant. 

Biologist. 

Sanitary Inspector. 



46 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doe. 



At both the beginning and end of the year the engineering force, 
including those engaged upon both the construction and maintenance 
of the works, numbered 42. The average force was constituted as 
follows : — 



Chief Engineer, 

Department Superintendents, 

Division Engineers, 

Assistant Engineers, 

Assistant Engineer and Sanitary Inspector, 

Draftsmen, 

Instrumentmen , 

Rodmen, 

Office Assistant, 

Biologist, 

Sanitary Inspectors, .... 

Stenographers and Clerks, . 

Photographer and Blueprinter, . 

Messengers and Laboratory Assistants, 



1 
4 
2 
7 
1 
2 
4 
2 
1 
1 
2 

10 
1 
4 



42 



There has been a maintenance force, exclusive of the engineers 
above mentioned, averaging 241, employed in the operation of the 
several pumping stations and in connection with the maintenance of 
the reservoirs, aqueducts and pipe lines, and in doing minor con- 
struction work. 

The number of men employed in the maintenance force of the 
several departments has been as follows : — 



Beginning 
of Year. 



End of year. 



Average. 



Wachusett Department, 

Sudbury Department, 

Distribution Department, pipe line3 and reservoirs, 
Distribution Department, pumping service, ^ 



46 
44 
71 
54 



215 



40 
49 
80 
56 



225 



51 

55 

78 
57 



241 



There has been a slight increase in the number of employees, due 
to the acquisition of Fisher Hill Reservoir and 14.41 miles of water 
mains in the town of Brookline, and also to an increase in the amount 
of forestry work done in the Sudbury Department. 



No. 57. 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



47 



CONSTRUCTION. 

Extension of Wokks to Hyde Park. 

Comparatively little work has been done in constructing new or 
additional works during the past year. The construction of the 
Hyde Park pumping station was nearly completed in 1912, and the 
station was placed in service on January 16, 1913, but many of the 
bills were not paid until 1913. 

The work done has included the laying of a tile floor in the 
engine room and concrete floor in the basement of the station, the 
adjusting, painting and testing of the engines, grading and sur- 
facing lawns, driveways and walks, including the setting of edge- 
stones, laying granolithic walks and planting shrubbery; the instal- 
lation of an engine and generator for use in lighting the building, the 
furnishing and placing of cast-iron plates forming the floor between 
the high and low pressure portions of each of the engines, and the in- 
stallation of mercury and electric gages for indicating and recording 
the elevation of the water at different points. 

The engines were guaranteed by the Laidlow-Dunn-Gordon Com- 
pany to give a duty of 115,000,000 foot pounds per 1,000 pounds of 
steam when operated at the rate of 3,000,000 gallons in 24 hours, 
and 105,000,000 foot pounds when operated at the rate of 1,500,000 
gallons in 24 hours, and the builder was entitled to a bonus of $100 
for each million foot pounds of work done in excess of the guarantee. 
The results of the tests were as follows: — 



Date of Test. 


Number of 
Engine. 


Rate 
(Gallons). 


Duration 
(Hours). 


Duty (Foot 
Pounds). 


Bonus. 


September 16, . 

September 18 

October 9, 

October 10, . . ' . 


13 
13 
14 

14 


1,500,000 
3,000,000 
1,500,000 
3,000,000 


12 
12 
12 
12 


105,852,000 
119,795,000 
106,633,000 
121,022,000 


$85 20 
479 50 
163 30 
602 20 




$1,330 20 



In connection with the grading of the grounds, 2,162 cubic yards 
of loam were furnished by T. H. Corrigan, of Hyde Park, for SI. 30 
per cubic yard; 235 tons of crushed stone were furnished for the 
driveways by the West Roxbury Trap Rock Company for $1.25 per 
ton; 2,339 square feet of granolithic walk were built by Warren 



48 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Brothers for $0,203 per square fopt; and 411 feet of curb stone were 
set by the city of Boston at a cost of $0,722 per foot. The drive- 
ways were built, shrubs planted and lawns seeded by the depart- 
ment force. The tile floor of the engine room was laid by the 
Galassi Mosaic & Tile Company for $220, or about 10 cents per 
square foot, the tiles being purchased by the Commonwealth at a 
cost of about 22 cents per square foot. 

During the month of April 152.5 feet of 24-inch pipe were laid at 
the junction of Hyde Park Avenue and Walkhill Street over the new 
channel of Stony Brook, replacing the temporary pipe line laid on 
private property during the previous year. Eleven flexible ball and 
socket joints were placed in the permanent line to provide against 
leaks due to settlement of the street. This work cost $1,068.62. 

The total amount expended on account of the extension of works 
to Hyde Park, including the cost of the pumping station, has been 
as follows: — 



During 

the Year 

1913. 



Total January 
1, 1914. 



Pipe Lines: — ■ 

Section 39, 

Section 40, 

Section 41, .......... . 

Pumping Station: — 
Land, . . .... . . . . 

Grading, fencing, edgestones, driveways, walks and shrubbery, . 

Side track, 

Building, including concrete foundation, coal pocket and chimney, 
Boilers, ............ 

Engines, ............ 

Piping, heating, etc., . 

Suction and force main connections, ...... 

Engineering and preliminary, . 



Total for Hyde Park extension, 
Amount appropriated for the work, 



$1,553 49 
571 73 

818 06 



$5,321 64 

6,610 94 

369 54 

12,484 03 

1,597 77 
631 25 

2,380 10 



$54,079 88 
31,270 85 
17,606 29 



$102,957 02 



$7,032 78 
9,337 70 
2,449 43 

35,243 96 
3,667 06 

19,457 19i 
3,343 70 
1,310 11 

13,250 61 



95,092 54 
$198,049 56 
$212,000 00 



1 Including $1,725.50 unpaid. 



Purchase of Works of the City of Boston in the Town of 
Brookline and City of Somerville. 

The acquisition by the Board of Fisher Hill Reservoir and the 
large mains previously owned and used by the city of Boston for the 
purpose of conveying water through the town of Brookline and the 
city of Somerville into its own limits, was authorized by chapter 694 
of the Acts of the year 1912, arid the sum of $600,000 was appro- 
priated for the purpose. A taking of the property was made on 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



49 



August 20, 1913, and the sum of $150,000 has been paid in full set- 
tlement therefor. 

The property taken includes Fisher Hill Reservoir, with a capacity 
of 15,400,000 gallons, and the fee of 459,670 square feet of land con- 
nected therewith, also 14.41 miles of main pipes in sizes from 20 to 
48 inches in diameter. The taking of the pipe lines includes the fee 
in 133,758 square feet of land, and easements in 120,138 square feet, 
both included in the location of a 48-inch pipe line extending from 
Beacon Street in Brighton to Boylston Street in Brookline. Of this 
land 53,558 square feet held in fee, and 67,738 square feet held in 
easements, are now utilized for public and private streets and by the 
Boston & Albany Railroad Company. The taking also included 
that portion of the Cochituate Aqueduct between Chestnut Hill 
pumping station No. 1 and Webber's waste-weir, a distance of 750 
feet. The length and size of the several pipe lines taken are as 
follows : — 





12- 
inch. 


_ 20- 
inch. 


24- 
inch. 


_ 30- 
inch. 


_ 36- 
inch. 


40- 
inch. 


_ 42- 
inch. 


_ 48- 
inch. 


Southern High-service Mains: — 

Connection at Fisher Hill Reservoir, 
Brookline, laid 1886, .... 

Park land, Chestnut Hill Avenue, Buck- 
minster Road and Fisher Avenue, 
Brookline and Brighton, 30-inch pipe 
laid 1886, 36-inch, 1894, .... 

Fisher Avenue park land, Lee, Warren, 
Dudley, Cottage and Perkins streets, 
Brookline and' West Roxbury, 30-inch 
pipe laid 1888, 42-inch, 1897, . _ . 

Boylston, Warren, Walnut and Washing- 
ton streets, Brookline, laid 1895, . 
Low-service Mains: — 

Park land, Brighton, laid 1877, 

Beacon Street, Clinton Path, private land, 
Clinton Road, private land, Buckmins- 
ter Road, Brookline and Brighton, laid 
1869, .- 

Boylston and Washington streets, Brook- 
line Avenue, Brookline, 30-inch and 36- 
inch pipes laid 1848, 40-inch, 1859, 

Beacon Street, Brookline and Brighton, 
laid 1880, 

Centre, Fuller and Harvard streets, 
Brookline, laid 1894, .... 

Broadway, Somerville, laid 1864, 

Pearl, Mt. Vernon and Perkins streets, 
Somerville, cement-lined pipe laid 1870, 


19 


3,514 


3,913 


. 20 
4,729 
6,818 

74 
5,580 

4,385 


156 
4,455 

153 

20 

79 
5,580 


84 
6,905 


1,108 


7,965 
475 

6,930 
13,120 


Totals, . . . 


19 


3,514 


3,913 


21,606 


10,443 


6,989 


1,108 


28,490 



76,082 linear feet, 14.41 miles. 



Connected with these mains, for the purpose of controlling the 
flow of water, there are 1 12-inch, 1 20-inch, 1 24-inch, 12 30-inch, 
9 36-inch, 2 40-inch and 1 48-inch valves, and 34 air valves. There 



50 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

are also connected with these mains, for use in draining same, 60 
feet of 6-inch pipe and 2 6-inch valves, 5 feet of 8-inch pipe and 
1 8-inch valve, 1,010 feet of 12-inch pipe and 15 12-inch valves, and 
445 feet of 16-inch pipe and 7 16-inch valves. 

Water Pipe Tunnel under Chelsea Creek. 

The Legislature on June 6, 1913, authorized the expenditure of 
$75,000 for the purpose of lowering the water mains which now cross 
Chelsea Creek between Chelsea and East Boston. This is to be 
done in order that the pipes shall not interfere with the dredging of 
the channel to a depth of 25 feet below mean low water. Plans have 
been prepared for the construction of a tunnel 520 feet long between 
the vertical shafts, through which a 42-inch cast-iron water pipe is to 
be carried across the creek channel at a depth sufficient to permit 
the dredging of a channel in the future 35 feet deep at mean low 
water. The plans have received the approval of the Directors of the 
Port, and work is to be commenced as soon as the approval of the 
Secretary of War is received. Twelve borings have been made to 
determine the character of the material through which the tunnel is 
to be constructed. The amount expended on account of this work 
to January 1, 1914, was $1,970.51. 

Improvement of Beaver Dam Brook. 

Chapter 814 of the Acts of the year 1913, approved June 16, 
authorized the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board to expend 
$33,000 in widening, straightening and deepening Beaver Dam 
Brook, a tributary of Lake Cochituate, which has its source at 
Waushakum Pond, in Ashland, and flows in an easterly and northerly 
direction for a distance of 21,300 feet into the south end of Lake 
Cochituate. 

The contemplated improvement includes the construction of a 
channel with a plank bottom XYi feet in width, with side slopes of 4 
horizontal to 1 vertical, the slopes to be paved with stone for a dis- 
tance of XYi feet from the bottom of the slopes on the straight por- 
tions of the brook and somewhat higher on the curves; the depth 
of the present channel to be slightly increased, the alignment 
straightened and the bottom given a uniform grade of 1 in 1,400. 
Construction is not to begin until easements, giving rights to con- 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



51 



struct and maintain the channel, have been obtained from the prop- 
erty owners along the line of the brook. One third of the expense 
incurred is to be paid by the town of Framingham. 

MAINTENANCE. 

Rainfall and Yield. 

The rainfall on the Wachusett watershed during the year 1913 was 
41.22 inches and on the Sudbury watershed 44.31 inches. On both 
watersheds the rainfall was below the average of past years, but 
more than during the previous three years on the Wachusett water- 
shed and the previous five years on the Sudbury watershed. Not- 
withstanding the larger rainfall, the yield, or quantity collected, on 
these watersheds was slightly less than in 1912, being 879,000 gallons 
per square mile per day on the Wachusett watershed and 733,000 
gallons per square mile per day on the Sudbury watershed. 

Storage Reservoirs. 

The following table shows the total capacity of the several storage 
reservoirs and the quantity stored in each at the beginning and end 
of the year : — 



Storage Reservoirs. 



Cochituate watershed: — 

Lake Cochituate, including Dudley Pond, 
Sudbury watershed: — 

Sudbury Reservoir 

Framingham Reservoir No. 1, 

Framingham Reservoir No. 2, 

Framingham Reservoir No. 3, 

Ashland Reservoir 

Hopkinton Reservoir, .... 

Whitehall Reservoir 

Farm Pond, 

Wachusett watershed: — 

Wachusett Reservoir, .... 
Totals 



Capacity 
(Gallons). 



2,328,300,000 

7,253,500,000 

287,500,000 

529,900,000 

1,180,000,000 

1,416,400,000 

1,520,900,000 

1,256,900,000 

167,500,000 

64,968,000,000 



80,908,900,000 



Amount stored. 



January 1, 

1913 
(Gallons). 



January 1, 

1914 
(Gallons). 



1,732,100,000 

5,848,700,000 

226,000,000 

491,200,000 

1,055,100,000 

1,379,500,000 

1,481,400,000 

1,227,500,000 

126,400,000 

50,652,200,000 



64,220,100,000 



2,043,900,000 

6,731,400,000 

220,400,000 

538,900,000 

900,500,000 

1,412,000,000 

1,508,900,000 

1,196,300,000 

125,400,000 

55,146,300,000 



69,824,000,000 



52 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

The diagram on the opposite page shows the quantity of water stored 
at different times throughout the past year in all the reservoirs com- 
bined and in the Wachusett Reservoir alone. The several reservoirs 
were practically full early in June, and there was a net gain in the 
quantity stored during the year of 5,603,900,000 gallons. 

Wachusett Reservoir. — At the beginning of the year the surface of 
the water in this reservoir was 11.21 feet below high-water mark, 
and this was the lowest point during the year. The reservoir surface 
rose 2.07 feet during January, followed by a fall of 0.51 of a foot to 
February 22. From this date the rise was continuous, and on April 
29 high-water mark (elevation 395) was reached. Stop-planks were 
placed on the wasteway and the reservoir allowed to rise above 
high water, where it remained the greater portion of the time until 
June 18. The maximum elevation was 395.38 on May 31. During 
the period while the reservoir was above high-water mark, no water 
was intentionally wasted, but there was a leakage of 71,700,000 
gallons through the joints between the flash-boards on the waste- 
weir. From June 2 to October 19 there was a continuous fall of the 
reservoir, due to a draft for supplying the District, amounting in 
the aggregate to 8.92 feet. After October 19 the reservoir surface rose 
very slowly, and at the end of the year was 7.52 feet below high 
water and 3.69 feet higher than at the beginning of the year. In 
compliance with the requirements of chapter 488 of the Acts of the 
year 1895, 826,400,000 gallons of water were discharged into the 
Nashua River below the dam, at the rate of not less than 12,000,000 
gallons per week, for the use of the Lancaster Mills. 

It has been necessary to continue the removal of soil from varying 
widths of land bordering on the shore of the reservoir between Hastings 
Cove, in Boylston, and Pine Hill in West Boylston, on the south 
shore, and at Kendall Cove, in Boylston, on the north shore, for an 
aggregate distance of 9,380 feet. In connection with the work of 
soil stripping, tree stumps, roots, logs and miscellaneous debris 
found along the shore entirely around the reservoir were collected 
and burned at a total cost, including the stripping of the soil, of 
$1,788.46. 

The improvement of a shallow flowage area on the east side of 
Thomas Basin, opposite the Oakdale Station of the Boston & Maine 
Railroad, which was begun in 1912 and mentioned in the last annual 
report, was completed early in the year. Including the work done 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



53 



DIAGRAM SHOWING 

QUANTITY OF WATER STORED IN THE WACHU5ETT RESERVOIR 
AND IN ALL THE STORAGE RESERVOIRS COMBINED 

DURING 1913 

JAN. FEB. MAR. APR. MAY JUN. JUL. AUG. SEP. OCT. NOV. DEC. 



82,000 



,000 



78,000 



76,000 



74,000 



72,000 



70,000 



if) 




c 


68,000 







(0 


66,000 









64,000 


c 







62,000 



2 60.000 
58,000 
56.000 
54,000 
52.000 
50,000 



(- 


-COMBINED CAPACITY OF 


/1/.Z. 


1 I 1 
STORAGE RESERVOIRS- 




















































































(0 

or 

oJ 


















































>/ 






















CO/ 






















a. 
























u i 
























| 
























o 
























10 
























«j/ 






































































N/ 










( CAPAC 


ITY AT 


HIGH 


WATER. 


EL. 39. 


5 
































or/ 
























0/ 

> 
























U 


























1/ 
























/ 






















I 


/ 






















t 

I.I 
























en 
























O/ 
























~2T 





















































































































82.000 
80,000 
78.000 
76,000 
74.000 
72.000 
70,000 



in 



68,000 


c 


66.000 







o 


64.000 




62.000 


c 
o 



JAN. FEB. MAR. APR. MAY JUN. JUL. AUG. SEP. OCT. NOV. DEC. 



60,000 2 

58,000 

56.000 

54,000 

52.000 

50,000 



54 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

in 1912, 2,350 cubic yards of loamy material were removed from the 
bottom of the reservoir and deposited along the shore in the form of 
an embankment having an area of about 0.6 of an acre. This em- 
bankment was faced on the side exposed to the water with boulders 
and cobbles from the excavation. On the surface of the fill and the 
adjacent shore of the reservoir 1,830 white pine and 375 arbor vitse 
trees have been planted. The cost of this improvement, including 
the work done in 1912, was $1,305.58. 

The work of repairing the concrete cre'st of the dam over which 
the flow of the Quinepoxet River is discharged into the reservoir was 
referred to in the report for 1912. The work has been continued 
during the past year, and all of the crest which showed any material 
signs of disintegration has been repaired by cutting out the disinte- 
grated concrete to a depth of from 2 to 3 inches and replacing it with 
Portland cement mortar secured to the sound concrete by means of 
iron bolts and wire netting. The amount expended for the work 
was $312.21. 

An area of about 2 acres, forming a part of the easterly portion of 
the North Dike, where considerable settlement of the material had 
taken place since the dike was built, and an area of 33^ acres on 
the westerly portion of the dike, where fire had destroyed the timber 
growth, have been graded, covered with loam, fertilized with 338 
cubic yards of sludge hauled from the Clinton sewerage filter-beds 
and seeded at a cost of $1,287.41. 

For the purpose of keeping cattle off the property of the Common- 
wealth, a 4-strand plain wire fence has been erected for a length of 
919 feet between land of the Board and Demetrius John, in West 
Boylston, and an equivalent length of fence has been erected by Mr. 
John. 

Standing and rowen grass from 422 acres of the marginal lands of 
the reservoir and the North and South dikes was sold at public 
auction for $3,436.50. This amount is somewhat less than that 
received the previous year, but is in excess of the average. 

The west shore of the Stillwater Basin, alongside the tracks of the 
Boston & Maine Railroad, has, for a distance of 100 feet, been pro- 
tected from erosion with light riprap. 

Eight life preservers have been placed at the most dangerous 
points about the reservoir and dam for use in cases of accident. 

Brush and weeds have been mowed, raked and burned from all 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 55 

highways fronting the property of the Board, from the face and 
riprap berm of the North and South dikes, and from the margin 
along the flow line of the reservoir. This work extended over 56.5 
miles and cost about $2,500. 

In the vicinity of the Wachusett Reservoir the Board owns 14 
houses, 10 of which are occupied by its employees engaged upon the 
care of the works. During the past year $2,304.34 was expended 
upon repairs to these houses, of which $1,386.93 was paid for repairs 
to the Cook house and barn, on the Oakdale-Clinton Road, in fitting 
it for the use of one of the foremen. The amount received for rent 
of these houses was $1,244.84. 

Wachusett Dam and Grounds. — The dam, together with the adja- 
cent structures and grounds, is in good condition. Measures taken 
in 1912 to prevent leakage through the roof of the upper gate- 
chamber, described in the last annual report, proved efficacious until 
recently, when a slight leakage took place, which was stopped by 
applying another coat of Minwax. 

Asphaltum which was originally placed in the joints between 
the granolithic blocks on the top of the dam has been removed, 
except over the gate and bastion chambers, and replaced with Luxfer 
Prism compound. All iron fences on the dam, the ironwork in the 
upper gate-chamber, and the iron flash-board standards on the waste- 
weir have been painted. The interior walls and ceiling of the upper 
gate-chamber were given two coats of Toch Brothers' "Konkerit," 
for the purpose of preventing further discoloration from alkali exud- 
ing from the brickwork and concrete. This treatment has not 
proved satisfactory and further experiments are in progress. 

A small masonry weir has been built under the railroad bridge 
below the dam, by means of which measurements can be taken of the 
water leaking through the flash-boards at the waste-weir. Two hun- 
dred and thirty cubic yards of sludge from the Clinton sewerage set- 
tling basins have been used as a fertilizer on the lawns about the 
dam. A bubbler has been attached to the drinking trough, in order 
to avoid the use of a public drinking cup. 

Sudbury Reservoir. — The surface of the water in this reservoir was 
2.46 feet below the crest of the overflow on January 1, 1913, and 
remained between 2.5 and 3.5 feet below the crest until March 20. 
For the greater portion of the time during the remainder of the year 
the water was kept above the crest by the use of stop-planks, but 



56 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

on December 31 was 0.20 of a foot below the crest, and 2.26 feet 
higher than at the beginning of the year. Minor. repairs have been 
made on two houses owned by the Board and occupied by its em- 
ployees, one on Farm Street near the Marlborough filter-beds, and one 
at Fayville. The older portion of the roof of the barn near the Sud- 
bury Dam has been reshingled and the barn and attendant's house 
painted. A Wheelock No. 65 wire fence, 659 feet long, was built on a 
portion of the property line between the Commonwealth and Ida M. 
Kaler, and a fence of the same pattern, 552 feet long, on the line 
between land of the Commonwealth and J. F. Chickering. A dress- 
ing of loam and chemical fertilizer was placed on the top and outer 
slope of the dam. 

Framingham Reservoir No. 1. — No water was drawn from this 
reservoir for the supply of the Metropolitan District, and water was 
wasted at the outlet dam nearly all of the time throughout the 
year. 

Framingham Reservoir No. 2. — No water was drawn from this 
reservoir during the year for the supply of the Metropolitan Dis- 
trict, and it remained full, except from August 20 to December 6, 
during which time it was kept about 3 feet below high water, in order 
to facilitate the widening of the Boston & Albany Railroad bridge 
which crosses the southerly end of the reservoir. The railroad bridge 
and roadbed have been widened so as to permit the laying of two 
additional tracks and to provide for a ditch between the outer track 
and the reservoir, in which wash from the roadbed can be diverted 
from the reservoir. The slope of the railroad embankment has been 
protected by riprap. The brush growing along the shore at the up- 
per end of the reservoir was cut and the shores cleaned, and the 
grassed slopes of the embankment at the dam given a dressing of 
loam and chemical fertilizer. 

Framingham Reservoir No. 3. — The greater portion of the water 
used in the Metropolitan District has been drawn from this reservoir, 
and it has been kept nearly full throughout the greater part of the 
year with water from the Wachusett Reservoir. During October, 
November and December the reservoir surface was kept about 2 feet 
below the stone crest of the dam, in order to facilitate the cleaning 
of the shores. No water was wasted from the reservoir during the 
year. The land held around this reservoir for the protection of the 
water supply has been increased in area by the purchase of 3.48 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 57 

acres of land from Myra F. Hessel for $2,500; 3.43 acres from A. O. 
Stensson for $450; and 2.41 acres from C. A. Nelson for $250. These 
parcels have been acquired at points where the width of the marginal 
land controlled by the Commonwealth was very narrow. 

Ashland, Hopkinton and Whitehall Reservoirs. — No water was 
drawn from any of these reservoirs for use in the Metropolitan Dis- 
trict, and they all remained substantially full throughout the entire 
year. At the Ashland and Hopkinton reservoirs debris has been 
removed from along the shores, and loam and chemical fertilizer 
spread on the grassed slopes of the dams. A No. 65 Wheelock wire 
fence, 790 feet long, was built on the property line between the Com- 
monwealth and H. M. and W. M. MacNear, below the Ashland Dam, 
in order to prevent cattle from obtaining access to the water in 
the channel below the reservoir. One cottage has been built near 
the shore of Whitehall Reservoir, and there are now 61 cottages 
near the shore, used by summer residents, also 129 boats of differ- 
ent kinds in use on the reservoir. 

Farm Pond. — The town of Framingham has drawn 276,300,000 
gallons from a filter-gallery alongside the shores of this pond, and 
85,400,000 gallons of water have been delivered into the pond from 
Framingham Reservoirs Nos. 1 and 2 through the Sudbury Aque- 
duct. 

Lake Cochituate. — The lake was 2.31 feet below high-water mark 
at the beginning of the year. It was substantially full and water 
was wasted at the dam at times from January 11 until June 23. A 
draft of 15,000,000 gallons per day for the supply of the District 
was maintained from August 11 until the end of September, lowering 
the water to elevation 141.82. After October 1 it rose slowly and at 
the end of the year stood at elevation 143.51, or 0.85 of a foot below 
high-water mark. The house occupied by the foreman has been 
painted and portions of the roof reshingled. A concrete basin has 
been built at the point where Bannister's Brook discharges into the 
channel which receives the surface drainage from the village of 
Cochituate, for the purpose of catching sand and other material 
brought down by the brook. The sand catcher consists of two 
basins, each 4 feet 3 inches wide x 33 feet 6 inches long, with side- 
walls of concrete, resting on a platform of 3-inch tongued and grooved 
plank, and is so arranged that the basins can be alternately drained and 
cleaned. The cost of the sand catcher and paved entrances to the 



58 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

diversion channel was $957.47. Three 15-inch Akron pipe drains, 
each 50 feet long, were laid for the purpose of draining the adjoining 
land into the diversion channel, at a cost of $277.81. 

Miscellaneous Work on the Sudbury ' Watershed. — Considerable 
work has been done in connection with the determination and mark- 
ing of the lines of property belonging to the Board in Cedar Swamp. 
Thirty-six bounds made of reinforced Portland cement, and 27 2-inch 
iron pipes from 7 to 20 feet long, have been placed to define the prop- 
erty lines at Cedar Swamp. Fourteen bounds have been set at Fram- 
ingham Reservoir No. 3, 18 at Lake Cochituate, 10 at the Sudbury 
Reservoir and 37 at Whitehall Reservoir. The trees and brush have 
been cut and removed along the lines of property belonging to the 
Board in Cedar Swamp for a width of 5 feet and a distance of 13,145 
feet, and at Whitehall Reservoir for a distance of 16,782 feet. 

Fifteen life preservers have been placed at different points about 
the reservoirs where it is thought they may be of service in case of 
accidents. 

Sources from which Water for the Supply of the Metro- 
politan District has been taken. 

An average of 84,830,000 gallons of water per day was drawn from 
the Wachusett Reservoir through the Wachusett Aqueduct into the 
Sudbury Reservoir. The following quantities of water have been 
drawn for use in the Metropolitan District: — 

Daily Average 
Gallons. 

From the Sudbury Reservoir through the Weston Aqueduct, . . 35,943,000 
From Framingham Reservoir No. 3 through the Sudbury Aqueduct, 64,624,000 
From Lake Cochituate through the Cochituate Aqueduct, . . 2,425,000 



102,992,000 



The drainage area of Spot Pond furnished a daily average of 
317,000 gallons. 

Aqueducts. 

The Wachusett Aqueduct was in use during the whole or portions 
of 288 days, but as the flow of water through the aqueduct is largely 
governed by the operation of the turbines at the power station, the 
actual time used was but 150 days, 18 hours and 52 minutes. The 
total quantity of water drawn from the Wachusett Reservoir into 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 59 

the aqueduct was 31,023,900,000 gallons, of which 28,527,600,000 
gallons, or 92 per cent., was used before its admission into the aque- 
duct for developing electric energy. The Westborough State Hos- 
pital has drawn from the aqueduct 60,904,000 gallons, equivalent to 
a daily average of 167,000 gallons. The work done in connection 
with the maintenance of the aqueduct has included the removal of 
sods and bunch grass along the high-water mark of the open channel, 
for a distance of 4,785 feet, at a cost of $189.46; the construction of 
302 feet of fence adjacent to land of Michael Wyzenski in North- 
borough; 472 feet alongside the Northborough Road in South- 
borough; and 668 feet between land of the Board and pasture land 
of F. H. Ballou in Southborough. Wheelock wire fence was used in 
all cases. The ironwork in the terminal chamber, the iron pipe rail 
fences on the Assabet bridge and at the crossing of Bartlett Street, 
in Northborough, and fences and other ironwork at six highway bridges 
and two dams along the open channel have been painted with Smith's 
durable metal coating. Six acres of land in Marlborough, lying on 
the southerly side of the open channel, about one quarter of a mile 
below the terminal chamber, have been cleared. This area was 
covered with oak, chestnut, birch and apple trees which were badly 
infested with gypsy and brown-tail moths and the chestnut bark 
disease. The wooden covers over two supply wells, from which 
water is supplied to a few takers in West Berlin, have been replaced 
with more permanent covers composed of 4-inch reinforced concrete 
slabs, supported by I beams, at a cost of $223.65. 

The Sudbury Aqueduct was in use during portions of 364 days and 
carried to Chestnut Hill Reservoir a daily average of 64,624,000 
gallons, which was 9,597,000 gallons per day less than during the 
previous year. On August 13 and 14 the aqueduct was used to 
convey 85,400,000 gallons of water from Framingham Reservoirs 
Nos. 1 and 2 to Farm Pond. Fences have been built, rebuilt or re- 
paired along the line of this aqueduct as follows: 180 feet of wooden 
fence with two 2-inch x 6-inch rails on both sides of Leach's Lane at 
South Natick; 158 feet of fence of the same pattern on both sides of 
Cartwright's Lane at Wellesley; 32 feet on the northwesterly side of 
Kendall Street at Sherborn; 799 feet on both sides of Brook Street 
at South Natick; 312 feet on both sides of Great Plains Avenue at 
Wellesley; 90 feet on the easterly side of Forest Street at Wellesley; 
275 feet on the west side of the westerly crossing of Wellesley Ave- 



60 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

nue; 444 feet on both sides of Brookside Road at Wellesley; 200 feet 
on both sides of Oakland Street at Wellesley; and 252 feet on both 
sides of the easterly crossing of Wellesley Avenue, a total of 2,742 
feet. No. 65 Wheelock wire fence has been built for a distance of 
336 feet on the property line on the south side of the aqueduct, east- 
erly from Great Plains Avenue in Wellesley, and 3,026 feet on prop- 
erty lines at Hurd's embankment. Board rail fences have been 
repaired for a distance of 583 feet. A concrete floor has been placed 
in the middle compartment of the storehouse near the west siphon 
chamber. Twenty-five thousand, three hundred pounds of chemical 
fertilizer have been spread on the surface of the embankments for an 
aggregate length of 28,400 feet of the aqueduct, at a cost of $414. 
The iron beams and rafters which support the slate roof at the gate- 
house at Farm Pond and at the west siphon chamber, the iron fence 
on the Waban bridge, the doors of the siphon and waste-weir cham- 
bers, and the manhole covers along the line have been cleaned and 
given one coat of paint, and the wooden steps at the east and west 
siphon chambers and Echo bridge have been oiled. 

The Cochituate Aqueduct was in use on 62 days during the year. 
Minor repairs have been made to the aqueduct and connected struc- 
tures, as follows: a new floor, composed of steel grating supported 
by 5-inch I beams has been placed in the pipe chamber on the east 
side of the Charles River, in place of the old floor which was in poor 
condition, and which was also so low that it was under water when 
large quantities of water were run through the aqueduct. The drive- 
way leading to this chamber has been graded so that the building can 
be reached by teams. The doors of the pipe and waste-weir cham- 
bers and the manhole covers have been painted. The interior of the 
aqueduct was inspected but not cleaned, as it was not considered 
necessary. Seven single cartloads of stone which had fallen or be- 
come loosened from the roof of the Newton tunnel during the con- 
struction of the supply pipe line tunnel near by were removed. 

The Weston Aqueduct was in use for conveying water from the 
Sudbury Reservoir to the Metropolitan District throughout the year 
except for four hours on January 13 and between March 18 and 
April 10, while the section of the aqueduct, 5,660 feet long, between 
the Weston Reservoir and the terminal chamber was being cleaned 
and repaired. The total quantity of water delivered through the 
aqueduct for the year was 13,119,200,000 gallons, equivalent to a 
daily average of 35,943,000 gallons. The cleaning of the aqueduct 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



61 



was done in the following manner: two gangs of men were employed 
one beginning at each end of the section to be cleaned and working 
toward each other. One gang used water and hand brooms in 
cleaning the sides and top of the aqueduct, a wagon with a tank 
body being used when cleaning the top. The second gang made use 
of the gasolene power sprayer by which water under 200 pounds' 
pressure was discharged against the interior surface of the aqueduct. 
This method proved more efficient, more economical and quicker 
than the hand method. The cleaning of the bottom was done 
with push brooms operated by hand. The ironwork of the gates 
and stop-plank grooves in the screen and terminal chambers was 
thoroughly scraped, dried by the use of torches, and painted with 
two coats of red lead and oil. When the aqueduct was first emptied 
it was found that water was flowing in through small crevices in 
the brick and concrete, the greater number of which were between 
stations 659 and 671, where the aqueduct is generally in tunnel. In 
this section 1,400 leaks in the tunnel lining were repaired by driving 
and calking wedge lead, tea lead or lead wool into the joints. The 
cost of cleaning and repairing this section of the aqueduct was as 
follows: — 





Labor. 


Materials. 


Total. 


Cleaning aqueduct, 

Cleaning and painting ironwork, .... 


$270 05 
121 00 

96 75 


$4 58 
21 27 
37 10 


$274 63 
142 27 
133 85 




$487 80 


$62 95 


$550 75 





The exterior of the 90-inch steel pipe, through which the water 
is carried over the Sudbury River, and the ironwork in siphon 
chamber No. 1 have been painted. Witch grass roots have been 
planted on an area of about 10,000 square feet on the south slope of 
the aqueduct embankment near siphon chamber No. 2. 

Sixteen thousand, eight hundred pounds of chemical fertilizer 
were spread on the aqueduct embankment for a distance of 21,000 
feet, at a cost of $289. 



Sewers along Sudbury and Cochituate Aqueduct Lines. 

No new sewers have been constructed during the year to receive 
the drainage from houses in close proximity to the aqueducts, but 
two houses in Newton were connected with sewers built in 1912. 



62 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



A payment of $4,990.61 has been made to the city of Newton during 
the year on account of sewers built in Grant Avenue and Hammond 
Street in 1912. 

Pumping Stations. 

Sixty-seven per cent, of the water supplied to the Metropolitan 
District has been pumped at the two stations at Chestnut Hill 
Reservoir, and the remainder has been delivered by gravity. The 
total quantity pumped at the five stations was 28,672,920,000 gal- 
lons, which was 12.7 per cent, less than in 1912. The cost of operat- 
ing the stations was $98,166.39, equivalent to $3,424 per million 
gallons pumped. The total cost was less than for the previous year, 
but the cost per million gallons shows an increase of $0,226, due to a 
reduction in the amount pumped. 

Coal for use at the several stations has been delivered into the 
bins, as follows : — 







Gross Tons. 


a 




i 


&c<i 








O 

m 
m 
O 


By whom furnished. 


SB 




d 

.2 
"•+3 


a 
.2 

'43 


d 

.2 
o3 






a a 


-4-a 
Xfl 


03 
W. 


DQ 


o 




+= rf 


+3 c3 





a 


o3 


f-> _ 






g* 


o 


O 
-P 


Pi 


P. 173 




to M 

43 " H 


to M 


o 
a 


.9 

u 


>> 


o 




o 


O 


Ol 


< 


M 


U 


Gorman-Leonard Coal Company, bituminous, . 


110.76 






_ 




$4.28 


Gorman-Leonard Coal Company, bituminous, . 


1,510.71 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4.00 


Gorman-Leonard Coal Company, bituminous, 


- 


1,945.89 


- 


- 


- 


3.95 


Gorman-Leonard Coal Company, bituminous, . 


- 


2,314.41 


- 


- 


- 


3.87 


C W. Claflin & Co., buckwheat anthracite, 


113.21 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3.09 


C W. Claflin & Co., buckwheat anthracite, 


79.29 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3.04 


C W. Claflin & Co., buckwheat anthracite, 


- 


275.00 


- 


- 


- 


2.91 


C. W. Claflin & Co., buckwheat anthracite, 


_ 


504.06 


- 


- 


- 


2.89 


Locke Coal Company, bituminous, 


- 


- 


428.26 


- 


- 


5.15 


Locke Coal Company, bituminous, 




- 


- 


301.68 


- 


- 


4.78 


Locke Coal Company, screenings, 




- 


- 


417.37 


- 


- 


2.50 


Bader Coal Company, bituminous, 




- 


- 


- 


274.13 


- 


4.51 


Bader Coal Company, bituminous, 




- 


- 


- 


156.41 


- 


4.40 


Roxbury Coal Company, bituminous, 




- 


- 


- 


- 


8.89 


5.32 


Spring Coal Company, bituminous, 




- 


- 


- 


- 


86.70 


4.61 


Gorman-Leonard Coal Company, bituminous, . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


141.74 


4.11 


E. B. Townsend Coal Company, bituminous, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


47.50 


4.11 


J. A. Whittemore's Sons, screenings, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


48.43 


2.52 


Roxbury Coal Company, pea, 2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


24.152 


5.88 2 


Total gross tons, bituminous, 


1,621.47 


4,260.30 


729.94 


430.54 


284.83 


_ 


Total gross tons, anthracite, .... 


192. 50 3 


779. 06 3 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Total gross tons, anthracite screenings, . 


- 


- 


417.37 


- 


48.43 


- 


Average price per gross ton, bituminous, -. 


4.02 


3.91 


4.99 


4.47 


4.30 


- 


Average price per gross ton, anthracite, 


3.073 


2.90 3 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Average price per gross ton, anthracite screenings, 


- 


— 


2.50 


— 


2.52 


— 



1 Includes cost of unloading coal from cars and all expenses incidental to storage of the coal. 

2 West Roxbury station. 

3 Buckwheat. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



63 



Bituminous coal has been purchased under contracts which pro- 
vide for a deduction from the contract price in case the coal contains 
less than 14,700 British thermal units or more than 8 per cent, of 
ash, and for a bonus for coal containing more than 14,800 British 
thermal units. The following table shows the results of the tests 
made of the several kinds of coal received : — 







Number 


British 


Percentage 


Percentage 
of Ash. 


Percentage 


Kind op Coal. 


of Samples 


Thermal 


of Volatile 


of 




tested. 


Units. 


Matter. 


Moisture. 


Beaver Run, ..... 


61 


14,554 


17.40 


8.04 


2.76 


Sterling, . 








17 


14,772 


21.89 


6.84 


2.83 


Sonman, . 








10 


14,710 


17.91 


6.84 


3.33 


Georges Creek, 








9 


14,537 


18.19 


7.94 


2.37 


New River, 








8 


14,844 


17.23 


5.80 


2.90 


Vulcan, 








2 


14,917 


21.39 


5.62 


3.17 


Carbon Forge, . 








1 


14,841 


17.92 


6.21 


2.18 


Condor, . 








1 


14,970 


17.67 


5.32 


2.72 



Chestnut Hill Pumping Stations. 

At these stations a daily average of 32,299,000 gallons of water 
was raised 121.71 feet for the supply of the southern high-service 
district, and a daily average of 37,651,000 gallons was raised 39.07 
feet for the supply of the low-service districts and for the northern 
high-service district. Statistics relative to the operation of the 
several engines at these stations are as follows : — 



Daily pumping capacity (gallons), 
Total quantity pumped (million gallons), 
Daily average quantity pumped (gallons), 
Coal used in pumping (pounds), . 
Gallons pumped per pound of coal, 
Average lift (feet), .... 

Cost of pumping: — 

Labor, 

Fuel 

Repairs, 

Oil, waste and packing, 

Small supplies, . . . . . 



Totals, 



Cost per million gallons pumped, 

Cost per million gallons raised 1 foot high, 



Pumping Station No. 1. 



Engines 

Nos. 
1 and 2. 



Engine 
No. 3. 



Engine 
No. 4. 



^.OOO.OOO 


20,000,000 


459.35 


23.56 


1,258,000 


65,000 


1,212,759 


29,525 


378.76 


797.97 


133.99 


120.15 


$2,054 90 


$83 63 


2,189 62 


52 98 


338 72 


13 79 


44 10 


1 80 


42 30 


1 72 


$4,669 64 


$153 92 


$10.1658 


$6.5331 


.0759 


.0544 



30,000,000 

3,991.82 

10,937,000 

2,783,226 

1,434.24 

119.19 



$9,808 56 

5,012 72 

1,902 24 

210 50 

201 91 



$17,135 93 

$4.2928 
.0360 



Pumping 

Station 

No. 2. 



Engine 
No. 12. 



40,000,000 

7,314.38 

20,039,000 

4,921,045 

1,486.35 

122.32 



$7,622 69 

8,364 56 

1,114 10 

357 69 

176 18 



$17,635 22 

$2.4110 
.0197 



Totals. 



106,000,000 

11,789.11 

32,299,000 

8,946,555 

1,317.73 

121.71 



$19,569 78 

15,619 88 

3,368 85 

614 09 

422 11 



19,594 71 

$3.3586 
.0276 



» 8,090,000 each. 



64 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

Chestnut Hill 

Pumping Station 

No. 2. — Engines 

Nos. 5, 6 and 7. 

Daily pumping capacity each engine (gallons), .... 35,000,000 

Total quantity pumped (gallons), . . . ' . . . . 13,742,460,000 

Daily average quantity pumped (gallons), . . , . . . 37,651,000 

Total coal used (pounds), 5,081,095 

Gallons pumped per pound of coal, 2,704.63 

Average lift (feet), 39.07 



Cost of pumping : — 

Labor, $18,469 74 

Fuel, 8,491 03 

Repairs, 1,217 83 

Oil, waste and packing, 275 39 

Small supplies, 135 65 

Total, $28,589 64 

Cost per million gallons pumped, $2.0804 

Cost per million gallons raised 1 foot high, .0532 



Compared with the corresponding figures for the year 1912 the 
quantity pumped at both stations was 3,749,110,000 gallons less; 
the coal used 2,455,602 pounds less; the total cost of pumping 
$6,389.61 less, and the cost of labor $981,27 less. 

The greater part of the pumping for the southern high service has 
been done by Engine No. 12 at Station No. 2, and advantage has 
been taken of the opportunity to make repairs at Station No. 1 
which could not have been conveniently done with the engines in 
operation at that station. The maple floor in the old portion of the 
engine room, built by the city of Boston in 1887, has been replaced 
by a floor composed of 9-inch x 9-inch Welsh tiles, laid on a bed of 
concrete reinforced with expanded metal of a pattern known as 
" Self-sentering." The expanded metal, concrete and tile form a 
layer about 3 inches in thickness which rests upon the old hard 
pine floor beams which supported the wooden floor. The cost of 
this floor, covering 4,000 square feet, including the removal of the 
old floor, was as follows: — 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 65 

Penn Metal Co., " Self-sentering," . $255 78 

L. L. Rinaldi & Co., Welsh tiles, 737 82 

Samuel Shaw & Co., laying tiles, 415 93 

Cement, sand, ironwork, etc., 261 80 

Labor by maintenance force, , . 694 67 



Total, $2,366 00 

Cost per square foot, . . . $0,591 

The toilet fixtures used in connection with the superintendent's 
office, which were of obsolete pattern and in poor condition, have 
been replaced by modern fixtures at a cost of $233.57. 

The site of this pumping station was filled to a depth of from 10 to 
15 feet about the year 1866, when Chestnut Hill Reservoir was built, 
with stumps and other material of a perishable nature. When the 
station was built the walls of the building and the engine foundations 
were carried down to solid ground, but the boiler foundations and 
the floors of the boiler room and engine room basement were sup- 
ported on the filled land. From time to time during the past fifteen 
years it has been found necessary to place more solid foundations 
under the boilers, and during the past year about 765 square feet of 
the concrete floor of the engine room basement, which had badly 
settled and cracked, has been removed and replaced with a new 
concrete floor. The toilet room in this part of the basement has 
been repaired and rearranged, and the old wooden lockers used by 
the employees have been replaced by 22 portable steel lockers each 
18 x 18 x 72 inches. The cost of these changes was as follows: — 

Labor and materials used in connection with floor and drains, . . $482 69 

Slate and plumbing work, 153 35 

Steel lockers, including cost of assembling, 163 77 



$799 81 



The foundation of the economizer and the floor of the boiler room 
are badly settled, and it is planned to repair them during the coming 
year. 

A new locker room and lavatory was completed and placed in serv- 
ice at Pumping Station No. 2 on April 8, 1913. This room is 30 
feet 2 inches long, 14 feet 11 inches wide, and 11 feet 2 inches high. 
It is located in the coal house, the walls of which form two sides of 



66 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

the room, the other sides being made of ferrolithic plates secured to 
a steel framework and plastered on both sides to give a total thick- 
ness of 2 inches. The floor is of concrete 4 inches thick, with a 
granolithic surface, and plastered on the' underside. The ceiling is 
composed of ferrolithic plates and cement mortar, 2 inches in thick- 
ness. The room contains 3 shower baths, 3 vitreous china lavato- 
ries and 32 steel lockers, each 18 x 18 x 72 inches. Ventilation for 
the room is provided by an 8-inch galvanized iron pipe connected 
into the space between the flue and the outer wall of the main 
chimney. This ventilator pipe has inlets, controlled by dampers at 
both the top and bottom of the room. The cost of this room and 
fittings was as follows : — 

Structural steel furnished and erected by the Smith Erecting & Con- 
tracting Co., ...... $42000 

Ferrolithic plates and mason work, Robert Gallagher Company, . . 540 00 

Plumbing and slate work, H. W. Orr Company, 355 25 

Ventilating pipe, F. E. Woodward & Co., 14 00 

Hardware, lumber, floors and windows, 81 89 

Labor, carpenters and laborers from maintenance force, . . . 215 89 
Labor, pumping station employees, steam piping, electric wiring, 

placing ventilating pipe, painting, etc., 144 08 

32 Durand steel lockers, including erection, ...... 234 40 

$2,005 51 

The lowest of several bids received on August 30, 1912, for the 
construction of this room was $2,690, and this bid did not include 
the cost of the steel lockers and other items given above, amounting 
in the aggregate to $358.40, so that by rejecting the first bids, sub- 
dividing the work between several contractors, and doing a portion 
of the work with our own employees, a saving of over $1,000 was 
effected. 

A contract has been made with the Green Fuel Economizer Com- 
pany of Matteawan, N. Y., for the reconstruction of the economizer 
which was installed at Station No. 2 when the station was built. 
The reconstructed parts were received at the station during the last 
week in the year. 

The steel channel beams which support the track in the coal 
house have been covered with concrete, and the concrete has been 
carried about 2 feet higher than formerly around the steel columns, 
in order to protect them from corrosion by the bituminous coal. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 67 

During May the entire woodwork of both pumping stations, with 
the exception of the monitors on the roof of Station No. 2, was 
painted one coat, and the doors were painted two coats. All the 
interior woodwork in the engine rooms, office and toilet rooms, 
except the ceilings, was cleaned and given a coat of varnish, and a 
considerable part of the surface was given two coats. The cost of 
this work was $645.30. 

Spot Pond Pumping Station. 

The following are statistics relating to operations at this station, 
where water is pumped to the Fells and Bear Hill reservoirs for the 
supply of the northern high-service district : — 

* 

Total quantity pumped (gallons), . 2,600,880,000 

Daily average quantity pumped (gallons), . -. . . 7,126,000 

Total coal used (pounds), ......... 2,230,505 

Gallons pumped per pound of coal, . . . . . . . .1,166.05 

Average lift (feet), . . 127.41 

Engine No. 8 operated (hours), ........ 58 

Engine No. 9 operated (hours), 3,104 

Quantity pumped by Engine No. 8 (gallons), 24,990,000 

Quantity pumped by Engine No. 9 (gallons), ..... 2,575,890,000 

Cost of pumping: — 

Labor, $8,970 15 

Fuel, 4,176 06 

Repairs, 386 19 

Oil, waste and packing, 259 67 

Small supplies, . 176 44 

Total for station, $13,968 51 

Cost per million gallons pumped, 5.3707 

Cost per million gallons raised 1 foot high, . . . . . .0422 

There has been a reduction in the cost of fuel and repairs, and the 
cost per million gallons raised one foot high shows a slight reduction. 
The exterior wood finish of the pumping station has been painted and 
the interior finish varnished by the C. P. Hicks Company of Maiden 
for $300. Early in the year a new floor, composed of 3-inch hard 
pine plank, was laid in the coal house by the pumping station 
employees, at a cost of $192.90, including both stock and labor. 



68 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Arlington Pumping Station. 

The statistics relative to the operation of this station for the year 
1913 are as follows: — 



Total quantity pumped (gallons), 

Daily average quantity pumped (gallons), 

Total coal used (pounds), . 

Gallons pumped per pound of coal, 

Average lift (feet), 

Engine No. 10 operated (hours), 

Engine No. 11 operated (hours), 

Quantity pumped by Engine No. 10 (gallons), 

Quantity pumped by Engine No. 11 (gallons), 

Cost of pumping: — 

Labor, 

Fuel, 

Repairs, ........ 

Oil, waste and packing, .... 

Small supplies, 



Total for station, 



Cost per million gallons pumped, 

Cost per million gallons raised 1 foot high, 



247,580,000 

678,000 

914,775 

270.65 

283.54 

5,301 

435 

234,960,000 

12,620,000 



$5,610 08 

1,857 46 

194 20 

88 15 

141 71 

$7,891 60 

$31.8749 
.1124 



The total cost of operating the station was less than in 1912, but 
the quantity pumped was also less, and the cost per million gallons 
raised one foot high was increased. 



West Roxbury and Hyde Park Pumping Stations, 

On January 16 one of the engines at the new Hyde Park pumping 
station was started, and at the same time the pumps at the West 
Roxbury station were stopped. Since that date all water pumped 
for the southern extra high service has been pumped at the Hyde 
Park station, except during 9 hours and 35 minutes on April 27, 
while work was in progress on the main through which water is sup- 
plied to the Hyde Park station. 

The following statistics of cost and work include the operations at 
both stations: — 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



69 



Hyde Park 
Pumping 

Station. 



West 

Roxbury 

Pumping 

Station. 



Combined 
Stations. 



Total quantity pumped (gallons), 

Daily average quantity pumped (gallons) , 

Total coal used (pounds), . 

Gallons pumped per pound of coal, 

Average lift (feet), 

Engine No. 13 operated (hours), 

Engine No. 14 operated (hours), 

Quantity pumped by Engine No. 13 (gallons), 

Quantity pumped by Engine No. 14 (gallons), 

Cost of pumping: — 
Labor, .... 
Fuel, .... 
Repairs, 

Oil, waste and packing, 
Small supplies, 

Total for station, , 
Cost per million gallons pumped, 
Cost per million gallons raised 1 foot high, 



279,550,000 

627,884 

445.23 

123.40 

3,809 

2,648 

163,680,000 

115,870,000 



.7088 
.2164 



13,335,000 

56,047 
237.93 
130.48 



$49.1541 
.3767 



292,885,000 
802,000 
683,931 
428.24 



$5,956 21 

1,317 76 

349 49 

134 66 

363 81 



$8,121 93 
$27.7308 



Consumption of Water. 

The daily average quantity of water consumed in the eighteen 
municipalities supplied from the Metropolitan Works during the 
year 1913, as measured by Venturi meters, was 103,847,700 gallons, 
equivalent to 94 gallons per capita in the district supplied. The 
daily average consumption was 12,383,000 gallons less than during 
the previous year, somewhat less than during any year since 1901, 
and less per capita than in any year since 1895. 

The daily average consumption of water in each of the cities and 
towns supplied from the Metropolitan Works during the years 1912 
and 1913, as measured by meters, was as follows: — 



70 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 











Estimated 

Popula- 
tion, 1913. 


Daily Average Consumption. 




1912. 


1913. 


Decrease 

in 
Gallons. 




Gallons. 


Gallons 

per 
Capita. 


Gallons. 


Gallons 

per 
Capita. 


Boston, . . . . 


733,360 


90,037,500 


125 


79,390,600 


108 


10,646,900 


Somerville, 








82,810 


6,427,500 


79 


5,958,000 


72 


469,500 


Maiden, . 








47,890 


2,226,300 


48 


2,225,700 


46 


600 


Chelsea, . 








35,820 


2,935,500 


85 


2,879,800 


80 


55,700 


Everett, . 








37,300 


2,707,800 


75 


2,435,800 


65 


272,000 


Quincy, . 








35,530 


3,003,100 


87 


2,699,100 


76 


304,000 


Medford, . 








25,650 


1,222,900 


49 


1,233,700 


48 


10,800! 


Melrose, . 








16,640 


1,132,100 


69 


1,136,600 


68 


4,500 1 


Revere, 








20,720 


1,495,400 


75 


1,385,100 


67 


110,300 


Watertown, 








14,060 


922,300 


67 


868,500 


62 


53,800 


Arlington, 








12,550 


1,075,500 


89 


786,300 


63 


289,200 


Milton, 








8,470 


343,300 


41 


332,300 


39 


11,000 


Winthrop, 








11,440 


717,400 


65 


689,700 


60 


27,700 


Stoneham, 








7,830 


590,700 


78 


414,400 


53 


176,300 


Belmont, . 








6,320 


434,500 


71 


463,600 


73 


29.100 1 


Lexington, 








5,400 


356,800 


68 


359,300 


67 


2,500 1 


Nahant, . 








1,380 


158,800 


120 


169,100 


123 


10,300 1 


Swampscott, 








6,640 


443,300 


68 


420,100 


63 


23,200 


District, 




1,109,810 


116,230,700 


107 


103,847,700 


94 


12,383,000 



1 Increase. 

The consumption in the several districts was as follows : — 



Gallons 

per Day, 

1913. 



Decrease 
(Gallons 
per Day). 



Percent- 
age of 
Decrease. 



Southern low-service district, embracing the low-service district of 
Boston, with the exception of Charlestown and East Boston, 

Northern low-service district, embracing the low-service districts 
of Somerville, Chelsea, Maiden, Medford, Everett, Arlington, 
Charlestown and East Boston, 

Southern high-service district, embracing Quincy and Watertown, 
the high-service districts of Boston, and portions of Belmont 
and Milton, 

Northern high-service district, embracing Melrose, Revere, Win- 
throp, Swampscott, Nahant and Stoneham, and the high-service 
districts of Somerville, Chelsea, Maiden, Medford, Everett and 
East Boston, 

Southern extra high-service district, embracing the higher portions 
of Hyde Park, Milton and West Roxbury, 

Northern extra high-service district, embracing Lexington and the 
higher portions of Arlington and Belmont, 

Totals 



45,085,200 
20,067,200 
29,879,000 

7,361,500 
776,600 
678,200 



4,565,900 
4,031,800 
3,062,100 

464,600 

60,800 

197,800 



9.20 

16.73 

9.30 

5.94 

7.26 

22.58 



103,847,700 



12,383,000 



10.65 



Average Rate of Consumption 

IN 

Metropolitan Water District 
— and — 

rainfall and average temperature of air at chestnut hill reservoir 

FOR 

EACH WEEK DURING 1913 



CONSUMPTION AND NIGHT RATE 

Jan. Feb. Mar. Apr. May June July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec 

4 II 18 25 I 8 15 22 I 8 15 22 29 5 12 19 26 3 10 17 24 31 7 14 21 18 5 12 19 Z6 2 9 16 23 30 6 13 20 27 4 II 18 25 I 8 15 22 23 6 13 20 27 



160 




30 


0) 




Q. 


80 


(/) 




C 




o 


10 


~ 




(0 




o 


60 






c 


50 


o 


40 


i 


30 




20 




10 





RAINFALL IN INCHES 


66 6 66 6 — oroorj — 66o o|cvj|o|6|cd|o|o|6|6|o|o| — [o 6 — _— 6 — ooorJ^oooo — jo — o|<^» 



AVERAGE WEEKLY TEMPERATURE 

Jan Feb. Mar. Apr. May. June July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec. 

4 II 18 25 I 8 15 22 ! 8 15 22 29 5 12 19 26 3 10 17 24 31 7 14 21 28 5 12 19 26 2 9 16 23 30 6 13 20 27 4 II 18 25 I 8 15 22 29 6 13 20 27 




Averages for 1912 shown in Red 



DIAGRAM SHOWING 
Average Rate of Consumption of Water 
in the Metropolitan District in 1913 
DURING THE ENTIRE DAY 

AND 

BETWEEN THE HOURS OF I AND 4 AT NIGHT 



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Q. 

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t_ 

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ro 

> 
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150 

140 

130 

120 

110 

100 

90 

80 

70 

60 

50 

40 

30 

20 

10 



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57.0 



34.8 



Dec.31.l9IZ 
Dec.31.1913 59.8 41.4 



zz 







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\ «- Average Rate per Capita for Entire District \ 




Percentage of Services Meterec 



97.7 75.0 



4 85.0 



56.9 100.0 42.5 78.3 339 93.0 



61.3 



50.0 79.3 39.7 100.0 1000 100.0 



1912-1913 



.0 73.6 100.0 



.0 75.4 



96.0 



99.3 



150 
140 
130 
120 
110 
100 
90 
80 
70 
60 
50 
40 
30 
20 



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Daily Average Rate of Consumption 1913 vy/^/A 

" Night between 1 A.M. and 4 A.M. 1913. 
Daily Average Rate of Consumption i 



9 2 



vn 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 71 

In 13 of the 18 municipalities supplied the consumption was less 
than in 1912. The large reduction in the quantity used as compared 
with that of the previous year was due, largely, to two causes, — 
the more general use of meters and the unusually mild weather 
during the winter of 1912-1913. It will be seen from an inspection 
of the diagram facing page 70, that the consumption during the 
summer months was from 5,000,000 to 12,000,000 gallons less than 
for the corresponding time in the previous year, while the con- 
sumption during January and February was about 25,000,000 gal- 
lons per day less in 1913 than in 1912. The average temperature 
of the air for these winter months was 32° in 1913 as compared with 
22° in 1912. 

The diagram facing this page shows the average daily per capita use 
and the rate of use between the hours of 1 and 4 a.m. in the several 
municipalities. The average daily rates varied from 39 gallons in the 
town of Milton to 123 gallons in the town of Nahant, but the per capita 
use in Nahant is very large during the summer, for the reason that 
the town has a very large summer population, for which no allow- 
ance is made in the census population, upon which the per capita 
consumption is based. The average daily per capita consumption 
in the cities of Boston and Medford and the towns of Winthrop and 
Stoneham for the year 1913 was less than the average rate of use in 
the same municipalities between the hours of 1 and 4 a.m. during 
the year 1908, indicating that the total daily use is now less than 
the use and waste during the night hours before the more general 
introduction of meters. 

The diagram on page 72 shows graphically the changes which have 
taken place in the total and per capita use of water since the year 1890, 
in the district now supplied from the Metropolitan Works. From 1890 
to 1902 the quantity used increased very rapidly, and it seems prob- 
able that if no means had been adopted to restrict the waste of 
water, the consumption of the Metropolitan District would, at the 
present time, be 60,000,000 gallons per day greater than it now is, 
and that the District would be expending several million dollars in 
procuring an additional supply of water. 



72 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



DIAGRAM SHOWING 

CONSUMPTION OF WATER 

IN THE 

METROPOLITAN WATER DISTRICT 
AS SUPPLIED IN 1913 
FROM 1890 TO 1913 



1830 
ir.rt - 








1895 








1900 1905 








1910 


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No. 57.1 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



73 



Metering of Service Pipes. 
The placing of meters on all new services and on 5 per cent, of 
those unmetered on December 31, 1907, in conformity with chapter 
52 of the Acts of the year 1907, has been continued during the year, 
and the following table shows the results accomplished in the several 
municipalities : — 



City or Town. 


Number of Meters re- 
quired to be set on Old 
Services Each Year. 


Meters 


SET ON 


Old Services. 


^© 

a 

m 
© 
o 

"> 

©-. 

CO 

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a> - 

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-j. of Services 
December 31, 




1908. 


1909. 


1910. 


1911. 


1912. 


1913. 


Per Cem 
meterec 
1913. 


Boston, 


4,276 


84 


5,503 


5,481 


6,487 


6,022 


5,600 


1,489 


1,888 


100,626 


41,654 


41.39 


Somerville, 


411 


732 


621 


501 


570 


488 


508 


255 


255 


12,827 


7,856 


61.25 


Maiden, 


14 


43 


62 


8 


2 


- 


2 


114 


112 


7,568 


7,512 


99.26 


Chelsea, 


240 


198 


756 


779 


1,092 


132 


33 


86 


86 


4,768 


4,693 


98.43 


Everett, 


252 


338 


255 


277 


285 


215 


235 


109 


134 


5,686 


2,260 


39.75 


Quincy, 


230 


358 


33 


423 


1,680 


1,090 


647 


396 


609 


8,564 


7,381 


86.19 


Medford, 


179 


857 


927 


1,555 


178 


6 


7 


301 


303 


.5,091 


5,073 


100.00 


Melrose, 


119 


2,432 


135 


7 


5 


- 


- 


95 


95 


3,784 


4,041 


100.00 


Revere, 


138 


85 


184 


110 


176 


154 


157 


245 


233 


3,971 


1,985 


49.99 


Watertown, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


166 


192 


2,417 


2,425 


100.00 


Arlington, . 


55 


108 


56 


63 


127 


261 


349 


132 


132 


2,409 


2,438 


100.00 


Milton, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


91 


91 


1,678 


1,678 


100.00 


VVinthrop, . 


100 


213 


975 


706 


6 


- 


- 


85 


81 


2,740 


2,667 


100.00 


Stoneham, . 


65 


116 


225 


186 


155 


252 


189 


46 


43 


1,544 


1,337 


86.59 


Belmont, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


115 


115 


1,242 


1,242 


100.00 


Lexington, . 


32 


113 


70 


56 


86 


95 


4 


103 


88 


1,063 


843 


79.30 


Nahant, 


16 


30 


40 


26 


18 


17 


4 


33 


33 


620 


371 


59.84 


Swampscott, 


21 


264 


142 


28 


13 


- 


- 


75 


75 


1,702 


1,702 


100.00 


Totals, . 


6,148 


5,971 


9,984 


10,206 


10,880 


8,732 


7,735 


3,936 


4,565 


168,300 


97,158 


57.61 



1 The number of new meters installed and the number of new services equipped with meters seldom 
agree exactly for the reason that service pipes are installed but meters are not set until the buildings are 
permanently occupied. 



During the year there was a net increase of 11,798 in the number 
of meters in use, and at the end of the year 57.61 per cent, of the 
168,300 services in use were provided with meters. In ten of the 
municipalities practically all of the services are now metered. 



74 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Water supplied Outside the Metropolitan District. 

During the year 1913, 385,927,200 gallons of water were supplied 
by the Metropolitan Works for use outside the Metropolitan Water 
District, as follows : — 



Places supplied. 


Total 
Quantity 
(Gallons). 


Average 

Daily 
Quantity 
(Gallons). 


Times during which 
Water was supplied. 


Amounts 
charged 

for 

Water 

supplied. 


Westborough State Hospital, 
Town of Framingham: — ■ 

From Framingham Reservoir No. 3, . 

From Filter-gallery at Farm Pond, . 

United States Government: — 
Peddock's Island, .... 

Town of Saugus, 


60,904,000 

6,700,000 

276,300,000 

37,262,000 
4,761,200 


167,000 
18,356 • 

I 

756,984 

102,100 
13,000 


May, 4 days, 
July, 22 days, 
August, 9 days, 
September, 1 day, 
October, 2 days, . 
November, 10 days, 
December, 26 days, 


•SI, 827 12 

• 

■ 160 80 

J 

529 89 

2,336 58 
280 00 



Quality of Water. 

About 82 per cent, of the water used in the Metropolitan District 
during the year was drawn from the Wachusett Reservoir; the 
remainder from the Sudbury Reservoir, Framingham Reservoir No. 3 
and Lake Cochituate. The water delivered from the taps has had 
less color, and the results of both chemical and biological examina- 
tions compare favorably with those of previous years. Weekly 
microscopical and bacterial examinations have been made in the 
laboratory of the Board, and chemical examinations have been fur- 
nished by the State Board of Health. There have been made 2,422 
microscopical and 1,105 bacterial examinations of the water from 
various parts of the works, and the results of 392 chemical examina- 
tions have been received from the State Board of Health. 

The results of the examinations of water drawn from a tap in 
Boston for alternate years since 1897 are given in the following table, 
and tables giving further details of the chemical and biological exam- 
inations will be found in Appendix No. 2. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



75 



1897. 1899 



1901. 



1903. 



1905. 



1907. 



1909. 



1911. 



1913. 



State Board of Health 
Examinations. 
Color (platinum standard), 
Total residue, 
Loss on ignition, 
Free ammonia, 

Albuminoid J Jg^ed, " 
ammonia, j suapended , 

Chlorine, . 
Nitrogen as nitrates, 
Nitrogen as nitrites, 
Oxygen consumed, . 
Hardness, 



Metropolitan Water and Sew 
erage Board Examinations. 
Color (platinum standard), 
Turbidity, ... 
Total organisms, 
Amorphous matter, 
Bacteria, 



0.55 

4.82 

1.84 

0.0009 

0.0193 

0.0177 

0.0016 

0.40 

0.0137 

0.0001 

0.64 

1.6 



0.59 



351 

177 
105 



0.28 

3.70 

1.30 

0.0006 

0.0136 

0.0122 

0.0014 

0.24 

0.0137 

0.0001 

0.35 

1.1 



0.32 



192 
201 
117 



0.29 

4.43 

1.64 

0.0013 

0.0158 

0.0143 

0.0015 

0.30 

0.0173 

0.0001 

0.42 

1.7 



0.34 
2.0 
243 
38 

162 



0.29 

3.98 

1.50 

0.0013 

0.0125 

0.0110 

0.0015 

0.30 

0.0142 

0.0001 

0.39 

1.5 



0.35 
2.2 

286 

36 

126 



0.24 

3.86 

1.59 

0.0020 

0.0145 

0.0124 

0.0021 

0.35 

0.0083 

0.0001 

0.35 

1.4 



0.28 
1.9 

528 

37 

231 



0.22 

3.83 

1.40 

0.0013 

0.0129 

0.0109 

0.0020 

0.33 

0.0068 

0.0001 

0.32 

1.3 



0.27 
2.2 

427 
47 

176 



0.18 

3.46 

1.43 

0.0011 

0.0128 

0.0103 

0.0025 

0.28 

0.0034 

0.0000 

0.25 

1.3 



0.23 
2.6 

1,959 
97 

195 



0.25 

4.18 

1.66 

0.0015 

0.0156 

0.0128 

0.0029 

0.38 

0.0029 

0.0000 

0.33 

1.4 



0.22 
2.2 

735 
76 

197 



0.13 

3.96 

1.15 

0.0014 

0.0150 

0.0120 

0.0026 

0.35 

0.0064 

0.0000 

0.26 

1.5 



0.16 
1.9 

410 
80 

140 



Note. — Chemical analyses are in parts per 100,000, organisms and amorphous matter in standard 
units per cubic centimeter, and bacteria in number per cubic centimeter. The standard unit has an 
area of 400 square microns, and by its use the number of Diatomacese are decreased, and the number of 
Chlorophyceae and Cyanophycese are very much increased, as compared with the number of organisms. 



A small growth of Synura appeared in the Wachusett Reservoir in 
October, which gave a faintly oily odor to the water, but this lasted 
only a few days, and with this exception the water in the reservoir 
was free from objectionable tastes and odors throughout the year. 

Dinobryon, Uroglena and Synura were present in small numbers 
in the Sudbury Reservoir throughout the year, but not in sufficient 
numbers to cause objectionable odors. A growth of Chlamydomonas 
appeared in this reservoir in August and continued until early in Octo- 
ber, giving the water at times a faintly or distinctly disagreeable odor. 

A growth of Uroglena appeared in Framingham Reservoir No. 3 
about the middle of June, lasted two weeks, and gave a faintly oily 
odor to the water. A growth of Chlamydomonas appeared in this 
reservoir late in September and caused the water to have a faintly to 
distinctly disagreeable odor during the month of October. This 
organism continued in the water in smaller numbers until the end of 
the year. 

No water was drawn from Framingham Reservoir No. 2, or the 
Ashland, Hopkinton and Whitehall reservoirs for the supply of the 
District. With the exception of Whitehall Reservoir, where there 
were growths of Uroglena, Synura and Dinobryon during February 
and March, all of these reservoirs have been free from growths of 
objectionable organisms. The color of the water in these reservoirs 



76 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

has varied from 27 to 186, while that of the water drawn from the 
Sudbury Reservoir and Framingham Reservoir No. 3, for use in the 
District, has had an average color of 13. 

A large growth of Aphanizomenon was present in Lake Cochituate 
throughout the year, and the water had a disagreeable odor the 
greater portion of the time. A distinctly oily taste and odor was 
given to the water of the lake during the month of May by a growth 
of Uroglena. 

Small growths of Uroglena, Chlamydomonas, Dinobryon and 
Synura have occurred in the several distributing reservoirs and for 
short periods have given the waters a slightly unpleasant taste, 
but very few complaints of the quality of the water furnished have 
been received. 

Sanitary Inspection. 

William W. Locke, with two assistants, has been continuously 
employed in inspecting the premises, 9,150 in number, on the several 
watersheds, and in taking such action as necessary to enforce the 
rules and regulations relative to the pollution of the water supply. 
Special inspectors have been employed during the summer season to 
see that the regulations of the Board relative to bathing, boating 
and fishing were obeyed. For the greater portion of the time from 
June 21 to November 1 the Boston & Albany Railroad was engaged 
in widening the bridge and roadbed which cross Framingham Reser- 
voir No. 2, near Ashland, and during this time an inspector was kept 
on the ground to see that precautions were taken to prevent pollution 
of the supply. The expense of this inspection, amounting to $491.36, 
is to be paid by the railroad. Twenty-five permits to cut ice for 
private use were granted at the Waushacum Ponds, in Sterling, and 
at the Framingham and Sudbury reservoirs, Waushakum and Dudley 
ponds, Whitehall Reservoir and Sudbury River, and the work of 
cutting and harvesting the ice was inspected. 

For violating the rules relative to fishing and bathing, thirteen per- 
sons were summoned into court and fined from $2 to $5 each, and the 
fishing permits given to ten other persons were revoked. 

The results of the inspection of the watersheds are given in the 
following tables : — 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



77 









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78 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



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No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 79 

On the Wachusett watershed there has been a decrease in the 
number of premises where the sanitary conditions are not entirely 
satisfactory, notwithstanding an increase in the total number of 
premises. The increased activity at the industrial plants on this 
watershed mentioned in the report for 1912 has continued, and 12 
plants, employing over 400 persons, have been in operation through- 
out the year. The Dawson Mill, in Holden, with 75 employees, 
began operations in January. Studies for the disposal of the manu- 
facturing wastes from the mills, as well as the house sewage from 
the town of Holden, have been in progress throughout the year. 

At the settlement on Gates Brook, in West Boylston, where about 
sixteen small houses have been built during the past eight years on 
a swampy area on which it is very difficult to maintain proper sani- 
tary conditions, there has been little change during the year. One 
dwelling has been built and one destroyed by fire. One house for- 
merly occupied during the summer only is now occupied throughout 
the year, and two houses are now being enlarged. The improve- 
ment of conditions on this area is now under consideration. 

Improvements in sanitary conditions have been made as follows: 
a cesspool has been constructed by the Board on the premises of 
M. H. Ferguson, in West Boylston, to receive the sink and water- 
closet drainage, which at certain seasons of the year was liable to 
reach a small stream which ultimately enters the reservoir. Two 
additional filter-beds have been built at the Mount Pleasant House 
in Holden by the owner of the property, and one of the old beds 
has been resurfaced with gravel. 

There has been comparatively little change in the sanitary con- 
ditions on the Sudbury River watershed. There has been an increase 
of 19 in the total number of premises, and a decrease of 12 in the 
number of those in which the sanitary conditions are considered 
unsatisfactory. 

On the Cochituate watershed the industrial growth and consequent 
increase in building has been less rapid than for the two years pre- 
vious, yet there has been a considerable increase in the number of 
premises. 

Five gravel filter-beds, each 50 feet x 50 feet, have been added by 
the owners of the Deerfoot Farm factory, at Southborough, to the 6 
beds previously used, and 4 concrete septic tanks have* been con- 
structed through which all wastes from the factory are carried before 
being applied to the filter-beds. 



80 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



The gas works in Marlborough have not been operated since early 
in 1913, the city now being supplied from works in South Framing- 
ham. Short extensions have been made to the public sewers in 
Westborough and Marlborough, and 13,530 feet of main and street 
sewers have been built in Framingham. 

In the city and towns on the Sudbury and Cochituate water- 
sheds which have systems for conveying sewage outside the water- 
sheds, the number of premises connected with the sewers has been 
increased by 128, and the number existing on streets where sewers 
have been built has been reduced from 102 to 99. The number in 
the several places on December 31, 1913, was as follows: — 





Premises connected 
with Sewers. 


Premises not connected 
with Sewers. 




1912. 


1913. 


1912. 


1913. 


Marlborough, 

Westborough, ...... 

Framingham, 

Natick, 

Sherborn, ....... 


1,560 
526 

1,280 

723 

5 


1,589 
529 

1,363 
734 

7 


55 
15 

4 
28 


45 
12 
17 
25 


Totals, 


4,094 


4,222 


102 


99 



All cases of typhoid fever which have been reported as occurring 
on the several watersheds have been carefully watched and measures 
taken to prevent the spread of the disease or contamination of the 
supply. Eleven cases were reported on the Wachusett watershed, 
5 of which were from Sterling, 1 from Princeton, 3 from Holden and 
2 from Boylston. Nineteen cases were reported on the Sudbury and 
Cochituate watersheds, 9 of which were from Marlborough, 6 from 
Hopkinton, 2 from Ashland, 1 from Framingham and 1 from Way- 
land. 

Swamp Ditches and Bkooks. 

The ditches, 36.36 miles in length, which have been constructed 
and are maintained by the Board on the several watersheds for the 
purpose of improving the quality of the water, have been cleaned and 
the weeds and brush cut and burned for a width of from 10 to 20 feet 
alongside the ditches. Ditches in the O'Brien swamp in Westborough, 
and the Baker and McHale swamps in Southborough, tributary to the 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 81 

open channel of the Wachusett Aqueduct, have been repaired by 
renewing the board bottoms of the ditches and reshaping and repair- 
ing the slopes for a distance of 6,979 feet at a cost of $646.06. 
Three thousand four hundred and twenty-nine feet of wire fence have 
been erected, at a cost of $357.70, alongside ditches through pasture 
land of C. E. Leland, in Southborough, for the purpose of keeping 
cattle from the ditches, except at two watering places. 

Ditches on Angelico Brook, which drains into Framingham Reser- 
voir No. 3, and the ditches on Broad Meadow and Mowry brooks, 
which drain into the Sudbury Reservoir, have been repaired by re- 
newing the board bottom for a distance of 2,353 feet and repaving 
10,440 square feet of the side slopes. 

The cost of repairing the 8.9 miles of ditches on the Sudbury water- 
shed was $1,034.37, not including the cost of the lumber, which had 
been on hand for several years. 

The colors of the waters from the several swamps which have been 
ditched were somewhat higher than for several previous years. 

Protection of the Supply by Filtration. 

The several filter-beds which are maintained by the Board for the 
purpose of purifying the water collected in the streams before its 
admission into the storage reservoirs have been maintained as usual. 
The Marlborough Brook filter-beds, having an area of 14 acres, on 
which is filtered the water received from about 2 square miles of 
the more thickly settled portions of the city of Marlborough, received 
and filtered the entire flow of the brook. The artificial beds, 5.36 
acres in area, were cleaned in July and again in October, and the 
natural beds were cleaned during the latter part of June and early 
in July. The filter-beds on Farm Street received diluted sewage from 
the overflow of the Marlborough main sewer during 5 days in 
March and 9 in April. 

At the Pegan Brook pumping station, where the surface drainage 
from an area of about 1 square mile in the thickly settled portion of 
the town of Natick is pumped upon filter-beds before entering Lake 
Cochituate, the pumps were operated during portions of 226 days, 
and 325,102,000 gallons, equivalent to a daily average of 890,690 
gallons, were pumped to the filter-beds. This was the entire flow of 
Pegan Brook and all the flow from the intercepting ditch, with the 
exception of about 6,000,000 gallons which flowed from the ditch 



82 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

directly into the lake during 4 days in March and 1 in April. The 
amount of coal used was 208,667 pounds, and 1,558 gallons were 
pumped per pound of coal. The cost of operating the pumping 
station, maintaining the filter-beds, building and grounds was 
$3,414.37, making the cost per million gallons treated $10.50, or 
$1.08 less than in 1912. 

The 4 filter-beds, with a combined area of 2 acres, on which was 
received the flow from 525 acres in the village of Sterling, treated the 
entire flow from the brook. 

The filter-beds on which the sewage from the Worcester County 
Training School is received and treated have been cared for and have 
operated satisfactorily throughout the year. 

The Gates Terrace filter-beds at Sterling Junction, on which is 
received the drainage from a few small cottages, were operated from 
April 5 to November 1. 

Forestry. 

Around theWachusett Reservoir 125,000 3-year-old white pine seed- 
lings have been planted on 95 acres of land on which the pines previ- 
ously planted were destroyed by fire in 1911 and 1912. For greater 
protection from fire in the future the new plantations have been so 
made that the planted areas, covering from 15 to 30 acres, are sur- 
rounded by open lanes 45 feet in width. About 1,500 3-year-old 
white pine seedlings were set out on old spoil banks along the open 
channel portion of the Wachusett Aqueduct in Marlborough and 
Southborough. 

At the Sudbury Reservoir 64,170 white pines were planted on 
about 50 acres, also 4,000 white pines along the Weston Aqueduct, 
as follows: 300 west of Edgell Street, at Nobscot; 2,600 near siphon 
chamber No. 3; 150 on the east side of the aqueduct opposite the 
Cochituate and Wayland road; 750 on the south side of the aque- 
duct east of the road from Cochituate to Wayland, and 200 west of 
School Street in Wayland. 

At the Weston Reservoir 518 cedar trees have been planted in 
double rows on each side of the open channel, and 56 pines and 31 
cedars on the dam near the screen chamber. 

At Spot Pond 785 white pines have been set out at different points, 
the greater number being on the south and east sides of the pond. 

In April and May the State Forester's department furnished 
300,000 white pines and 100,000 spruce seedlings, all one year old. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 83 

These were planted in nurseries at Oakdale, near the Wachusett 
Reservoir, and at the Sudbury Reservoir in Southborough, for use in 
planting during the coming year. 

The Oakdale nursery has been enlarged from 1.4 to 3.9 acres, and 
at the close of the year contained : — 

6,200 4-year-old white pine seedlings, transplanted twice. 
800 3-year-old white pine seedlings, transplanted twice. 
25,000 3-year-old white pine seedlings, transplanted once. 
165,500 2-year-old white pine seedlings, transplanted once. 
38,600 2-year-old white pine seedlings, in seed beds. 
36,300 2-year-old white spruce seedlings, transplanted once. 
200 2-year-old sequoia seedlings, transplanted once. 
200 1-year-old red pine seedlings, in seed beds. 

The nursery at the Sudbury. Reservoir covers 2 acres, and con- 
tained at the end of the year : — 

130,000 2-year-old white pine seedlings, transplanted once. 
3,200 3-year-old white pine seedlings, transplanted twice. 

After an examination of the chestnut trees on different parts of the 
works, and the consideration of reports from other parts of the 
country regarding the chestnut bark disease, it was deemed expe- 
dient in 1912 to begin the cutting of chestnut trees which gave 
unmistakable signs of being affected by the disease. During the 
winter of 1912 and 1913 a force of from 8 to 15 men was employed 
in cutting the trees on 48 acres of the west shore of Andrews harbor 
at the Wachusett Reservoir, 25 acres of which were covered with 
a growth of chestnut trees from 25 to 40 years old, 12 acres with a 
growth of chestnut, maple and oak sprout and 11 acres with a 
growth of maple, oak, pine and chestnut about 25 years old. The 
25-acre parcel has been cleared and the chestnut trees cut from 
the 11-acre parcel. The clearing of the 12-acre parcel is now in prog- 
ress and about 4 acres had been cleared at the end of the year. 
About 3 acres were cleared from a 28-acre parcel on the north side 
of the reservoir near the line between the towns of Boylston and 
West Boylston, on which there was a growth of oak and chestnut 
from 15 to 20 years old. The chestnut trees were cut on 7H 
acres near the Oakdale nursery at West Boylston. Other areas 
around this reservoir where there were chestnut trees were inspected, 
and trees showing advanced signs of the disease were cut. During 
the past summer all chestnut trees were inspected, and as it appeared 
that the bark disease was not developing as rapidly as was feared, work 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



in the future is to be confined to the removal of trees which are 
affected with the disease beyond a reasonable doubt, except on 
areas where the work has been partially , done. This work was re- 
sumed on November 3, and at the end of the year about 2,830 trees 
from 4 to 15 inches in diameter had been cut on 610 acres of land. 
The following table gives a summary of the work done in connection 
with the chestnut bark disease, the cost of same and the approxi- 
mate value of the telephone poles, railroad ties, fence posts and 
cord wood obtained : — 





Season 
of — 


Location. 


Area 
cleared 

(Acres). 


Area 
treated 

(Acres). 


Cost. 


Products. 


Approx- 
imate 
Receipts. 


1912-1913, 


Lots 148A, B and C, 
Lot 106A, 


25 
3 


- 


$4,500 
345 


Poles, ties, fence posts, 

cord wood. 
Chair logs, cord wood, 


$4,900 
207 




Lot 44B, 


7.5 


- 


305 


Cord wood, 


79 




General, . 


- 


- 


194 


Poles, ties, cord wood, 


13 


1913-1914, 


Lot 148B, 


4 


- 


415 


Cord wood, 


75 




General, . 


- 


610 


1,092 


Poles, ties, cord wood, 


503 



A 6%-acre lot near Sterling Junction, on which the trees were 
partially burned in May, 1911, has been cleared at a cost of $332, 
from which is to be deducted $232 for wood sold. The dead trees, 
stumps and brush were cleared from 8 acres of land at Big Crane 
Swamp, from which E. W. Wheeler & Son had cut the timber. The 
cost of this work was $475, less a credit of $85 for wood sold. The 
work of cutting the standing trees on about 105 acres in Big Crane 
Swamp has been continued by E. W. Wheeler & Son of Berlin, but 
the contractor has experienced difficulty in keeping men on the work 
and but little progress has been made during the year. 

The protection of the trees from the ravages of destructive insects 
has necessitated the expenditure of the following sums : — 

Spot Pond, $1,275 40 

Mystic Lake, 53 00 

Chestnut Hill Reservoir, 526 74 

Weston Reservoir, . . 923 79 

Sudbury, Cochituate and Weston aqueducts, ..... 976 18 

Lake Cochituate, 468 32 

Sudbury Reservoir, 2,137 33 

Framingham Reservoirs Nos. 1, 2 and 3 and Whitehall Reservoir, . 262 65 

Wachusett Reservoir and aqueduct, 2,724 16 

$9,347 57 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 85 

In addition to the above sums there has been expended $5,574.15 
for two Fitzhenry-Guptill spraying machines and $700 for 2,000 feet of 
1-inch hose used in connection with same. The machine in the Wachu- 
sett Department is motor driven and so arranged that the tank and 
pump can be removed and the machine used as a motor truck when 
desired. This machine cost $4,465.32, including truck and body. 
The machine used in the Sudbury Department is horse drawn and 
cost $1,187.15. Judging from the results obtained by the use of the 
horse-drawn spraying machine, purchased in 1911 and used by the 
Distribution Department, the use of these machines will reduce the 
cost and increase the efficiency of the spraying work during the com- 
ing year. 

In the Distribution Department the egg clusters of the gypsy 
moth were destroyed during the fall and winter by painting with a 
creosote mixture, and the webs or nests of the brown-tail moth were 
cut from the trees and burned. The trees on 150 acres were sprayed 
between May 28 and June 21, using 8,300 pounds of arsenate of lead 
in the proportion of 1 pound of lead to 10 gallons of water. 

Fifty-six gallons of creosote mixture were used in this department 
in painting egg clusters. The elm trees were twice sprayed for the 
purpose of destroying the elm-leaf beetle. 

In the Sudbury Department considerable work has been done along 
the lines of the Sudbury, Cochituate and Weston aqueducts in cut- 
ting and pruning out undesirable trees and brush and burying stones, 
all of which were infested with the eggs of the gypsy moth. Clusters 
of the eggs of the gypsy moth were destroyed on different parts of 
the Sudbury and Cochituate works as follows: — 

Sudbury Aqueduct, 11,800 

Cochituate Aqueduct, 58,900 

Weston Aqueduct, 20,700 

Lake Cochituate, 3,900 

Sudbury Reservoir, 49,400 

Framingham Reservoirs Nos. 1, 2 and 3, 2,100 

Near Rocklawn Mills on Sudbury River, 500 

147,300 

The spraying machine was used from May 26 to July 7 on infested 
areas at the Sudbury Reservoir, Framingham Reservoirs Nos. 1, 2 
and 3, Lake Cochituate and at several points along the Weston 
Aqueduct as far east as siphon chamber No. 2. Trees which could 



86 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

not be conveniently reached by the power sprayer were sprayed by 
using a hand pump. The area sprayed was approximately 450 acres, 
and 7,100 pounds of arsenate of lead were used. The cost of spray- 
ing, including the material used, was $1,240.80. 

In the Wachusett Department comparatively few gypsy moths 
have been found, but still in sufficient numbers to occasion consid- 
erable concern lest they become as numerous as they have on other 
portions of the works. The eggs have been creosoted wherever 
found, and webs and nests of the brown-tail moth were cut from 
trees along the line of the open channel of the Wachusett Aqueduct, 
on the grounds at the dam and along the roads about the W T achusett 
Reservoir, but no attempt was made to pick them from the woodland 
in general. Between 5,000 and 6,000 trees on about 440 acres cov- 
ering substantially the same areas as those given above were sprayed 
with 4,600 pounds of arsenate of lead at a cost, including the material 
used, of $1,005.13. 

The young white pines on 1,247 acres of the marginal lands around 
the Wachusett Reservoir, as well as those around the Sudbury Res- 
ervoir, were inspected, and the shoots found to be infested with the 
pine-tree weevil were cut off and burned. The number of infested 
shoots was less than in previous years. The tent caterpillar was 
more prevalent than for several years past, and large numbers of the 
nests were burned. 

Thirty-two fires were reported during the year as occurring 
on lands of the Board at various points. In seventeen cases the 
cause was reported as sparks from a locomotive, and in only 
one instance was more than slight damage done. This fire occurred 
on April 23, when sparks from a locomotive started a fire which 
burned over about 8 acres of land on the shore of the Stillwater 
Basin at West Boylston, and destroyed 10,000 white pines from 2 to 
3 feet high. 

Distributing Reservoirs. 

The water collected and stored in the reservoirs on the several 
watersheds has been conveyed to and delivered from the following 
reservoirs and standpipes located in or near the Metropolitan 
District. 



Xo. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 87 

Capacity 
in Gallons. 

Spot Pond, Stoneham and Medford, 1/791,700,000 

Chestnut Hill Reservoir, Brighton district of Boston, . . . 300,000,000 

Weston Reservoir, Weston, 200,000,000 

Fells Reservoir, Stoneham, . 41,400,000 

Mystic Reservoir, Medford, 26,200,000 

Fisher Hill Reservoir, Brookline, 15,500,000 

Waban Hill Reservoir, Newton, 13,500,000 

Forbes Hill Reservoir, Quiney, 5,100,000 

Bear Hill Reservoir, Stoneham, 2,450,000 

Arlington Standpipe, Arlington, 550,000 

Forbes Hill Standpipe, Quiney, . . 330,000 

Total, 2,396,730,000 

Weston Reservoir. 

The grounds and structures connected with this reservoir have 
received the customary care and are in good condition. 

Chestnut Hill Reservoir. 

In addition to the ordinary care of the grounds the walks sur- 
rounding the reservoir have been resurfaced with stone dust for a 
distance of about three-quarters of a mile; the driveway between 
the two basins has been repaired and oiled, and 20 pine and spruce 
trees planted. The cost of inspection and police work on the grounds 
about the reservoir was $591.51. 

Waban Hill Reservoir. 

The reservoir has been in constant service, has received the cus- 
tomary care and is in good condition. 

Fisher Hill Reservoir. 

This reservoir came under the control of this department on Sep- 
tember 5. The reservoir and gate-house are generally in good con- 
dition, although some repairs will be necessary to the screens and 
stop-planks during the coming year. The grounds have received but 
little care during recent years, and the maintenance force is now 
engaged in trimming the trees, destroying moths and cutting under- 
brush. 



88 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

Forbes Hill Reservoir and Standpipe. 
The granolithic walk which surrounds this reservoir has been 
cracked for several years and will probably soon require repairs. 
The standpipe is in good condition. 

Mystic Reservoir. 

The embankments have been given a dressing of manure and the 
roadways resurfaced with stone dust. A woman was drowned in the 
reservoir on September 15, and the water was shut off from the re- 
mainder of the system until December 29. 

Mystic Lake. 

The fishway at the Mystic Lake Dam has been lengthened about 
25 feet so as to reach the water in the lower lake. This was made 
necessary by the permanent lowering of the lower lake by the Met- 
ropolitan Park Commission. 

Spot Pond. 
The exterior and interior woodwork of the gate-houses has been 
painted, also the floors and other ironwork in the interior. The cable 
used between the pumping station at Spot Pond and the gate-house 
at Bear Hill, in operating the telephone and recording gages, which 
had been injured by electrolytic action, has been temporarily re- 
paired. About 250 feet of 10-inch drain pipe has been laid on Main 
Street on the west side of the pond, connecting with Dark Hollow 
Pond three catch basins which receive surface drainage from the 
roadway. About 3,000 feet of footpath has been graded and par- 
tially surfaced with screened ashes. The cost of inspection and 
police work at the pond during the year was $1,110. 

Fells and Bear Hill Reservoirs. 

The woodwork of the gate-house at each of these reservoirs was 
painted. The Bear Hill Reservoir was emptied and thoroughly cleaned 
between April 15 and 18. The spraying machine was used in wash- 
ing the sides and bottom of the reservoir, aided by workmen with 
push brooms, in removing mud from the bottom. The sides and 
bottom were given a wash of cement and marble dust. A considera- 
ble growth of Potamogeton, or pond weed, and Anachoris, or Ameri- 
can water weed, was found on the bottom of this reservoir. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 89 

Pipe Yards. 

The buildings at the Chestnut Hill and Glenwood pipe yards are 
in good condition. A new concrete floor has been placed in the 
blacksmith shop and in a portion of the open shed at the Glenwood 
pipe yard, and the driveways have been resurfaced with crushed 
stone. 

Pipe Lines. 

No additional mains have been laid during the year, but the length 
of the mains owned and operated by the Metropolitan Water and 
Sewerage Board has been increased by the purchase from the city of 
Boston of 14.41 miles of large pipes, nearly all of which are in the 
town of Brookline and the city of Somerville. The length controlled 
by the Board on December 31, 1913, was 116.10 miles, and the 
length of mains 4 inches in diameter and larger connected with the 
works, but owned and operated by the several cities and towns sup- 
plied with water, 1,779.01 miles. 

Fox Hill Bridge. 

The work of relaying a portion of the 16-inch water pipe leading 
to Nahant and Swampscott was made necessary by the reconstruc- 
tion of the bridge crossing the Saugus River between Saugus and 
Lynn. This work was begun in 1912 and was referred to in the last 
annual report. At the end of 1912 the pipe line laid upon a tem- 
porary bridge was still in use, and no work had been done on the 
permanent line. Early in May the laying of 16-inch pipes on the 
concrete shelf which was constructed for that purpose on the north 
side of the bridge was begun, and continued as rapidly as the con- 
struction of the bridge permitted, but it was not until June 25 that 
the final connection was made on the permanent line. The pipe is 
now supported on a concrete shelf alongside the new bridge for a 
distance of 200 feet, and passes under the channel at the draw in an in- 
verted siphon, with the top of its horizontal portion 14 feet below Boston 
City Base. For a distance of about 200 feet on the Saugus side of 
the river the old bridge has been replaced by solid filling, but the 
water pipe is still supported by a pile foundation and enclosed in a 
double wooden box. The side of this box next to the street has been 
protected by a covering of cement reinforced with wire netting. 



90 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

The total cost of the changes in the water pipe made necessary by 
the reconstruction of the bridge was $6,548.56, of which $2,600 was 
expended in 1912 and the remainder during the past year. 

Relaying 24-inch Main on Broadway in Chelsea. 
It had been known for several years that the 24-inch pipe on 
Broadway, in Chelsea, was being destroyed by electrolytic action, 
and money was provided in the yearly appropriation for relaying a 
portion of this main if found necessary. Investigation, following 
a leak which occurred July 19, showed that the pipe should be relaid 
at once, and work was begun August 4 and finished October 18. 
The portion relaid extended from near Williams Street to Chelsea 
North bridge, a distance of 1,379.4 feet. The condition of the pipe 
taken up is given elsewhere in this report, under the head of Electrol- 
ysis. The pipe was originally 0.81 of an inch in thickness, but the 
pipe used in relaying is 1.03 inches thick, and nearly all of the 
joints have been made with wood instead of lead, for the purpose of 
preventing injurious electrolytic action in the future. The cost of 
this work to December 31, 1913, was $7,384.74, to which will be 
added during the coming year the cost of repaving the trench with 
granite blocks laid in cement on a concrete foundation. 

Anderson Bridge. 

The construction of the masonry arch bridge over the Charles 
River between Cambridge and Brighton, in place of the pile struc- 
ture, in which there was a draw opening, made it possible to carry 
the water pipes over the river instead of under the river bed, and as 
the two 36-inch mains which cross the river at this point were known 
to be deteriorated by electrolytic action it was decided to lay pipes 
over the bridge. The pipes and special castings required for the 
work have been obtained. The pile foundation required on the 
Cambridge side of the river has been built, and 146.4 feet of 48-inch 
and 121.6 feet of 36-inch pipe laid. The pile foundation was pre- 
pared and some of the labor in connection with laying the pipes was 
furnished by the Holbrook, Cabot & Rollins Corporation. The 
amount expended on account of this work to December 31, 1913, was 
$4,951.49. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 91 

Connection with Mains of the City of Maiden for Emergency Use. 

In order that water may be supplied to Revere, Winthrop, Swamp- 
scott, Nahant and the higher portions of Chelsea and Everett, at 
times when the main upon which these districts depend for their 
supply is out of service at a point in Maiden where it passes under 
the Saugus Branch Brook and the Saugus Branch of the Boston & 
Maine Railroad, a connection has been made between the 30-inch 
main and a 12-inch pipe of the city of Maiden, by means of which 
the municipalities beyond the point of connection can be supplied in 
case it becomes necessary to shut off the Metropolitan main. This 
connection was made between October 22 and November 6 at a cost 
of $1,074.24. 

Check Valve at Winthrop. 

A 12-inch check valve has been installed at the Revere- Winthrop 
line, so that in case of an accident to the Metropolitan main the 
water in the standpipe in Winthrop will be retained for the use of 
that town. 

Miscellaneous. 

The supply main leading from the terminus of the Weston Aque- 
duct toward Chestnut Hill Reservoir, which was laid in 1902 and 
1903, has been cleaned for a distance of 6,800 feet, at a cost of 
$384.25, or $0,056 per foot. The tubercles were removed from 
the interior of the pipe by laborers using wood and iron scrapers, 
and the pipe was then washed by the use of the spraying machine, 
using a jet from a 3^-inch diameter nozzle under a pressure of 200 
pounds per square inch. The lighter material was washed out of the 
blow-offs, and 45 cubic feet of the heavier material, composed prin- 
cipally of tubercles, was removed in pails. 

The concrete-lined tunnel and steel pipe on Section 7 of the 60- 
inch supply pipe line in Newton has been drained, cleaned and 
inspected, and a few shrinkage cracks in the concrete lining repaired 
by calking with lead wool. 

An Akron pipe drain 8 inches in diameter and 375 feet long, has 
been laid from a blind well located west of Loring Street, in Weston, 
and following the 60-inch pipe line crossing Loring and River streets, 
to another blind well provided with an overflow. The object of this 
drain is to divert water collected by the 00-inch pipe trench from 



92 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

the street gutter on Loring and River streets. This work cost 

$468.23. 

The boxing around the pipes at bridges over the Fitchburg Rail- 
road at Webster Avenue, in Somerville, ' and the Boston & Albany 
Railroad at St. James Street, in Newton, was cleaned, repaired and 
painted, and the boxing at the College Avenue bridge over the 
Boston & Lowell Railroad, in Medford, and the Massachusetts 
Avenue bridge over the Fitchburg Railroad, in Cambridge, has been 
repaired. 

Leaks. 

There have been 56 leaks and 3 breaks in the mains during the 
year, costing for repairs and damages $3,411.29. 

More than half this sum was paid on account of a break in the 
48-inch main at the junction of Clinton and Dean roads, in Brook- 
line, on December 4, 1913. The pipe line in which this break 
occurred was laid by the city of Boston in 1869, and had previously 
broken several times. At the time of the last break a piece of iron 
31.6 square feet in area was blown from the side of one of the pipes, 
and water flowed from the opening at the rate of about 80,000,000 
gallons per day for nearly two hours, while the gates controlling the 
flow of water were being closed. This great volume of water washed 
away the surface of the streets and excavated holes from 3 to 5 feet 
deep in the neighboring lawns, entered the basements of several 
houses and slightly undermined the rails of the Brookline Branch of 
the Boston & Albany Railroad at a point 2,500 feet away from the 
break. The cost of repairing the pipe, which was done by the main- 
tenance force, was $554.02; the labor and materials used in repairing 
private property, also furnished by the maintenance force, was 
$530.55; the cost of repairing streets, the work being done by the 
town of Brookline, was $259.23; and the amount paid for injury 
done to personal property by water entering houses was $541.15, a 
total of $1,885.05. It will be necessary to reseed some of the lawns, 
plant shrubs and relay some of the walks during the coming spring. 

A small leak from a joint in one of the 24-inch pipes which cross 
over the subway in Harvard Square, Cambridge, continued for sev- 
eral months and caused considerable expense before it was located 
and repaired. The water from this leak passed up and then over 
the subway, and appeared in the basement of the building occupied 
by the Harvard Co-operative store, at a distance of about 75 feet 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 93 

from its source. The cost of tracing this leak and making repairs 
was $294.26. 

A leak from a joint in the 30-inch high-service main on Main 
Street, in Maiden, at a point where the main passes under Saugus 
Branch Brook and is 11 feet below the surface of the street, was 
repaired on June 29 at a cost of $300.73. The difficulty in repairing 
this leak, on account of its location, called attention to the desira- 
bility of making the connection with the Maiden pipe system, which 
was afterward made and is described elsewhere in this report. 

On July 3 and 4 an increase of pressure in the form of water 
hammer developed on the southern high-service system, extending 
over that system from the pumping station at Chestnut Hill to West 
Roxbury and Quincy. The concussion was so great on the force 
mains near the Fisher Hill Reservoir that it caused leaks from 12 
joints and necessitated shutting off the main. The exact cause of 
the water hammer was not determined, but it is thought to have 
been due to the action of the pumping engines in connection with 
air in the pipes. 

Fourteen of the 56 leaks repaired have occurred at wooden joints, 
and in most cases were caused by settlement of the pipes. 

The 24-inch cast-iron main on Temple Street, Somerville, was on 
November 18 found to be split, caused by settlement on to a stone 
which rested on a ledge. The cost of repairing this leak was $266.71, 
due largely to difficulty in locating the broken pipe. 

Meters. 
There are now 71 Venturi meters connected with the works. 
Four of these are at the Wachusett Dam and are used in measuring 
water drawn from the W 7 achusett Reservoir. Two are located on 
the pipes leading from the Sudbury Dam and are used for measuring 
water drawn from the Sudbury Reservoir and delivered into the 
Weston Aqueduct. Sixty-five are on connections through which 
water is supplied to the different municipalities. There are also 3 
Hersey disc meters, 1 Hersey torrent meter and 5 Hersey detector 
meters used in measuring small quantities which cannot be con- 
veniently measured with meters of the Venturi type. The work of 
caring for the meters in the Metropolitan District has been done by 
two men, assisted at times by a third. The cost of the work con- 
nected with the reading, operating and maintaining of these meters 
has been $1,974.38. 



94 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

Recording Gages. 

Twenty-two recording gages have been maintained for the purpose 
of continuously indicating and recording at different points the water 
pressure existing in the Metropolitan mains. The records from these 
gages, together with those from gages maintained by the cities and 
towns, often prove of much value in fixing the time when breaks in 
the mains occur, as well as the loss of pressure due to same; also the 
loss of pressure due to abnormal drafts and other facts of interest. 
Table No. 44 in Appendix No. 2 gives the average results of obser- 
vations made during the year. In general, the water pressure 
throughout the Metropolitan District was slightly greater than 
during the previous year. 

Electrolysis. 

As stated elsewhere in this report it has been found necessary to 
take up a 24-inch main in Chelsea, which had been in use 25 years, on 
account of its destruction by electrolytic action. It is noticeable that 
in every case where the Metropolitan mains have been laid in streets 
passing power stations of the electric railroads they have been de- 
stroyed by electrolytic action. Five hundred ninety-three feet of 
12-inch pipe in Washington Street, Lynn, near the power station of 
the Bay State Street Railway, was relaid in 1904, after having been 
in use six years. Eight hundred twenty-seven feet of 48-inch pipe in 
Boylston Street, Cambridge, near the power station of the Boston 
Elevated Railway, was relaid in 1910, after fourteen years' use, and 
the 24-inch pipe relaid during the past year, in Chelsea, passes the 
power station of the Bay State Street Railway, which has been in 
operation since 1892. Examinations of this pipe made during previous 
years have shown that the pipes were being steadily deteriorated, 
and the leak which occurred in July indicated that the pipe could 
not be longer continued in use with safety. When removed from the 
trench the iron from the pipe, combined with the material in which 
the pipes were laid, was found to have formed a coating around the 
pipe from 2 to 3 inches in thickness, and sufficiently hard to require 
the use of picks for its removal, while the pipes could be cut with a 
knife to a depth of from one-quarter to three-quarters of an inch. 
In removing the pipes from the trench and cleaning them, 145 holes 
from three-quarters of an inch to 3 inches in diameter were made 
through the pipes. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



95 



The amount expended since January, 1904, for relaying three 
mains which have been destroyed by electrolytic action has been 
$20,681.50. 

No material change in the electrical conditions on the Metropol- 
itan Water Works pipe lines has been observed during the year. 

Clinton Sewage Disposal Works. 

The Clinton sewage disposal works were operated daily through- 
out the year. The daily average quantity of sewage pumped to the 
filter-beds was 1,008,000 gallons, which was 49,000 gallons per day 
less than in 1912, but still largely in excess of the quantity pumped 
in other previous years. The large quantity of sewage pumped 
during the last two years was due in great measure to the leaky 
condition of the sewers in Clinton, and to the fact that a number of 
rain-water conductors from buildings have been connected with the 
sewers. By-laws have recently been adopted by the town which 
forbid such connections being made in the future. The daily average 
quantity pumped during each month of the year was as follows : — - 

Gallons. 

January, 1,186,000 



February, 

March, . 

April, . 

May, . 

June, 

July, 

August, . 

September, 

October, 

November, 

December, 



1,015,000 

1,315,000 

1,598,000 

1,094,000 

946,000 

783,000 

734,500 

761,000 

859,000 

860,000 

950,000 



Pumping Station. 

The following are statistics relating to the operation of the pump- 
ing station: — 

Daily average quantity of sewage pumped (gallons), .... 1,008,000 

Daily average quantity of energy consumed (kilowatt hours) , . . 312 
Daily average quantity of coal consumed, in burning sludge and 

heating (pounds), 257 

Gallons pumped per kilowatt hour, 3,230 

Daily average lift of sewage (feet), 49.1 

Daily average efficiency of pumping unit (per cent.), .... 56.1 

Number of days pumping, 365 



96 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

Cost of pumping : — 

Labor, $1,342 51 

Energy (at $5.30 per thousand kilowatt hours), 603 82 

Fuel, coal for burning sludge and heating, . . . . . 227 64 

Repairs and supplies, 321 30 

Total for station, $2,495 27 

Cost per million gallons pumped, $6,780 

Cost per million gallons raised 1 foot high, .138 

Substantially all of the pumping was done with the 12-inch motor- 
driven centrifugal pump, which has operated very satisfactorily. 
When new the pump showed an average efficiency of between 58 and 
60 per cent., but as the protecting rings in the casing and impeller 
became worn the efficiency fell to 48 per cent. After five months' 
use of the pump the substitution of new rings, at a cost of $32.34, 
restored the pump to its original efficiency, and the new moving 
parts being made of cast iron instead of brass have thus far given 
better results than the rings first used. 

The cost of operating the station, using the centrifugal pump, 
shows a marked saving when compared with the cost when the 
sew r age was pumped with the steam-driven Blake plunger pump. 
The cost of doing the work during the past year was $1,493.17 less 
than in 1912, and about $560 or 18 per cent, less than the average 
cost during the previous thirteen years. 

The lawns, driveway and walks about the pumping station have 
been resurfaced and the lawns reseeded. 

Filter-beds. 

Sewage was applied to the filter-beds in substantially the same 
manner as during the preceding 53^ years. The 8 settling basins 
into which the sewage is pumped previous to being applied to the 
filter-beds were used in pairs in rotation throughout the year. Dur- 
ing the winter season the basins were used continuously for a month, 
but from April 1 to December 1 they were emptied and cleaned after 
one week's use. Each of the 25 1-acre beds has received about 
70,000 gallons of sewage in a period of 30 minutes at intervals of 
1.7 days, equivalent to about 40,300 gallons per acre per day. 
During the winter season the surface of the beds was plowed in 
furrows 3J^ feet apart. Of the sludge collected in the basins 568 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



97 



cubic yards have been used on grass land on the back slope of the 
North Dike and on the lawns about the Wachusett Dam, and 182 
cubic yards have been piled near the filtration area for future use. 
The following tabulation shows the results of the analyses of the 
sewage and effluent for the past year as compared with those for 
previous years : — 

[Parts per 100,000.| 







Average 

of Four 

Years, 

1906-09. 


1910. 


1911. 


1912. 


1913. 


Whole 




Janu- 
ary to 
June. 


July to 
Decem- 
ber. 


Year, 
1913. 


Albuminoid ammonia, sewage, 


.7540 


.7050 


1.0683 


1.6017 


1.1550 


1.2500 


1.2025 


Albuminoid ammonia, effluent, 




.0768 


.0686 


.0639 


.0724 


.0440 


.0298 


.0369 


Per cent, removed, . 




89.7 


90.3 


94 


95 


96 


98 


97 


Oxygen consumed, sewage, 






7.045 


6.658 


9.3292 


11.812 


9.567 


9.067 


9.317 


Oxygen consumed, effluent, 






1.085 


.8863 


.8713 


.5170 


.6006 


.4067 


.5037 


Per cent, removed, . 






83.5 


86.7 


91 


95.5 


94 


96 . 


95 


Free ammonia, sewage, . 






4.1617 


3.8867 


5.7417 


4.2129 


3.8300 


4.7867 


4.3083 


Free ammonia, effluent, . 






1.3134 


.6493 


.7369 


.6709 


.2906 


.0677 


' .1792 


Per cent, removed, . 






67.5 


83.3 


87 


84 


92 


99 


96 


Nitrogen as nitrates, effluent, 




.1724 


.7338 


.9740 


.8638 


.9682 


1.9972 


1.6542 


Iron, effluent, 




1.9807 


.6395 


.5203 


,3779 


.1106 


.0287 


.0696 



The effluent from the beds has improved continuously since 1909 
and the results obtained during the past year have been better than 
any previously obtained and compare very favorably with those ob- 
tained on other filtration areas in the Commonwealth. The cost of 
maintaining the filter-beds has been as follows: — 

Labor, $3,812 34 

Supplies and expenses, 160 31 

Total, $3,972 65 

Cost per million gallons treated, $10 80 



Hydro-electric Power Station. 
The hydro-electric power station at the Wachusett Dam was oper- 
ated on 276 days during the year, and nearly all of the electric energy de- 
veloped was delivered to the Connecticut River Transmission Company 



98 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



under a five-year contract, which went into effect on October 2, 1911. 
The daily output has varied from the minimum amount which the 
Transmission Company is required to take under its contract to the 
full capacity of the plant, which is about 70,000 kilowatt hours 
when the generators are operated continuously. The plant has 
operated satisfactorily and there have been no interruptions worthy 
of note. The following are the statistics relative to the operation of 
the station : — 



Quantity of energy sold to Connecticut River Transmission Com- 
pany (kilowatt hours), . • 

Quantity of energy used at power station (kilowatt hours), . 

Quantity of energy used at Sewerage Pumping Station (kilowatt 
hours), 



Total quantity of energy generated (kilowatt hours), 



Quantity of water used (gallons), .... 

Average effective head (feet), 

Kilowatt hours generated per million foot gallons, . 
Efficiency of station (per cent.), 

Earnings : — 

Energy supplied Connecticut River Transmis- 
sion Company at $5.30 per thousand kilo- 
watt hours, 

Labor supplied Connecticut River Transmission 
Company, 

Energy supplied power and sewerage pumping 
stations, credited at $5.30 per thousand kilo- 
watt hours, 



6,098,729 
14,278 

113,928 

6,226,935 



28,527,600,000 

90.6 

2.409 

76.7 



$32,323 28 



93 50 



679 49 



$33,096 27 



Cost of operating station : — 
Labor, .... 
Fuel for heating building, 
Repairs and appliances, . 
Oil and waste, . 
Small supplies, 
Taxes, . 



Net earnings, 

Net earnings per thousand kilowatt hours generated, 



$5,375 26 

94 03 

363 72 

51 79 

129 95 

2,975 00 



8,989 75 
$24,106 52 

$3 87 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 99 

Engineering. 

In addition to supervising the work already described in this 
report, the engineering force investigated and prepared estimates for 
work required for supplying the town of Braintree with water, 
including the construction of a reservoir in the Blue Hill park reser- 
vation; surveys, plans and estimates of cost have been prepared for 
caring for the waste waters from the mills at Quinepoxet, Jefferson 
and Dawsonville, the sewage from the towns of Holden and West 
Boylston, and the water of Gates Brook, which receives some objec- 
tionable drainage from a settlement in West Boylston near the 
Worcester line; plans and estimates of cost of swimming pools in the 
towns of Ashland and Hopkinton were made for the information of 
legislative committees; plans and estimates have been prepared for 
widening the roadway at the point where Cedar Street passes under 
the Cochituate Aqueduct in the town of Wellesley; surveys and plans 
have been made of land which the Board proposes to acquire around 
Framingham Reservoir No. 3, and surveys, plans and reports have 
been made relative to numerous petitions received for the use of land 
on different parts of the works. 

Appended to this report are tables giving the amount of work done 
and other information relative to contracts, a series of tables relat- 
ing to the maintenance of the Metropolitan Water Works, including 
the rainfall, yield of sources of supply, consumption of water in the 
different districts, the number of service pipes, meters and fire hy- 
drants in the Metropolitan Water District, and a summary of sta- 
tistics for the year 1913. 

Respectfully submitted, 

DEXTER BRACKETT, 

Chief Engineer. 
Boston, January 1, 1914. 



100 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



BEPORT OF THE ENGINEER OF SEWERAGE WORKS. 



To the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board. 

Gentlemen : — The following report of the operations of the Met- 
ropolitan Sewerage Works for the year ending December 31, 1913, 
is respectfully submitted : — 

Organization. 

The Engineer has charge of the design and construction of all new 
works, and of the maintenance and operation of all the works con- 
trolled by the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board for removing 
sewage from the twenty-four municipalities which comprise the Met- 
ropolitan Sewerage districts. 

The Engineer has had the following assistants : — 

Henry T. Stiff, Division Engineer, in charge of office 

and drafting room and of construc- 
tion of the new Mystic sewer, North 
Metropolitan System. 

Clarence A. Moore, ^ Assistant Engineer, in charge of mainte- 

nance studies and records. 

Arthur F. F. Haskell, . . . Assistant Engineer, in charge of survey 

work and field work in connection 
with the new Mystic sewer construc- 
tion. 

In addition to the above, the average number of engineering and 
other assistants employed during the year was 13, which includes 
2 instrumentmen, 4 inspectors, 2 draftsmen, 3 rodmen and 2 sten- 
ographers. 

METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE DISTRICTS. 

Areas and Populations. 

During the year no changes have been made in the extent of the 
sewerage districts as given in the last annual report. 

The populations of the districts, as given in the following table, 
are based on the census of 1910. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



101 



Table showing Areas and Estimated Populations within the Metropolitan Sew- 
erage Districts, as of December 81, 1913. 



City or Town. 



Area (Square 
Miles). 



Estimated 
Population. 



a 

03 

*o . 
o.S 



o 

8.1 

M CO 

Q 



'Arlington, 
Belmont, 

Boston (portions of), 
Cambridge, . 
Chelsea, 
Everett, 
Lexington, 1 . 
Maiden, 
Medford, 
Melrose, 
Revere, 
Somerville, . 
Stoneham, . 
Wakefield, . 
Winchester, . 
Winthrop, 
Woburn, 



Boston (portions of), 

Brookline, 

Dedham, 1 

Milton, 

Newton, 

Quincy, 

Waltham, 

Watertown, . 



Totals, 




12,760 

6,440 

108,380 

110,100 

36,360 

37,900 

4,410 

48,420 

26,040 

16,780 

21,090 

83,670 

7,950 

12,260 

10,150 

11,630 

16,150 



220,890 
30,800 
9,730 
8,550 
43,130 
35,970 
30,070 
14,250 



570,490 



393,390 
963,880 



1 Part of town. 



METROPOLITAN SEWERS. 

Sewers Purchased and Constructed and their Connections. 

During the year there has been built 2.46 miles of Metropolitan 
sewer within the sewerage districts, so that there are now 105.886 
miles of Metropolitan sewers. Of this total, 9.642 miles of sewers, 
with the Quincy pumping station, have been purchased from cities 
and towns of the districts, the remaining 96.244 miles of sewers and 
other works having been constructed by the Metropolitan boards. 

The locations, lengths and sizes of these sewers are given in the 
following tables, together with other data referring to the public and 
special connections with the systems : — 



102 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



North Metropolitan Sewerage System. 
Location, Length and Sizes of Sewers with Public and Special Connections. 





Size of Sewers. 


m 

3 

.2 


; Connec- 
s, Decem- 
31, 1913. 


Special Connections. 


City ok Town. 


Character or Location of 


.3 a 

s-i'43 

O eg 






+3 


=3 C H 

x>.2 % 


Connection. 


S a 






(U 


3 -IJfO 




^o 






i-A 


P4 




z 


Boston: — 












Deer Island, 


6' 3" to 9' 0", 


1.367 


4 

( 


Shoe factory, . 


i 


East Boston, 


9'0"tol'0", 


5.467 


25 | 


Middlebrook Wool-combing 
Co., 


i 








[ 


Navy Yard, .... 


8 


Charlestown, 


6'7"X7' 5" to l'O", . 


3.292 


14 


Almshouse, .... 


1 








\ 


Private building, . 

Club house, .... 


1 
1 


Winthrop, 


9'0" 


2.864 


12 


Fire Department Station, 


1 










Private building, . 

Bakery, .... 

Rendering works, . 


1 
1 
1 


Chelsea, 


8'4"X9'2"to 1' 10"X2'4", 


5.123 


12 < 


Metropolitan Water Works 
blow-off, .... 

Chelsea Water Works blow- 
off, . . 

Metropolitan Water Works 
blow-off, .... 

Cameron Appliance Co., 


1 

2 


Everett, 


8' 2"X8' 10"to4'8"X5' 1", 


2.925 


7 < 
f 


Shultz-Goodwin Co., 
Andrews- Wasgatt Co., . 
National Metallic Bed Co., . 
Linoide Co., .... 
Factory, ..... 
Metropolitan Water Works 




Maiden, . 


4'6"X4' 10" to l'O", 


5.8441 


*'i 


blow-off, .... 
Private buildings, . 
Private buildings, . 


167 
111 


Melrose, . 


4' 6"X4' 10" to 10", . 


6.099 2 


36 j 


Factory, ..... 
Railroad station, . 










Park Department bath house, 










f 


Harvard dormitories, 




Cambridge, . 


5'2"X5'9"to 1'3", . 


7.209 


39 j 


Slaughterhouse, 

City Hospital, 

Street railway machine shop, 

Tannery, .... 

Slaughterhouses (3), 






















Car-house, .... 












Somerville Water Works blow- 




Somerville, 


6'5"X7'2"to 1'3", . 


3.577 


io <! 

• 


off, 

Street railway power house, . 

Stable, 

Rendering works, . 
Railroad scale pit, . 
Armory building, . 




Medford, 


4' 8"X5' 1" to 10", . 


5.359 


23 j 


Private buildings, . 

Stable, 

Police substation, . 
Tannery, .... 
Private buildings, . 




Winchester, . 


4' 6" to 1' 3", . 


8.830 


14 J 
I 


Gelatine factory, . 

Stable, ..... 

Railroad station, . 




Stoneham, 


1' 3" to 10", 


0.010 


4 


- 




Woburn, 


l'10"X2'4"to 1' 3", . 


0.933 


3 


Glue factory, .... 










f 


Private buildings, . 


141 


Arlington, . . 


1' 6" to 10", - . 


3. 520 3 


38 | 


Railroad station, . 
Car-house, .... 
Post office, .... 


3 
1 



1 Includes 1.84 miles of sewer purchased from the city of Maiden. 

2 Includes .736 of a mile of sewer purchased from the city of Melrose. 

3 Includes 2.631 miles of sewer purchased from the town of Arlington. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



103 



Location, Length and Sizes of Sewers with Public and Special Connections 

— Concluded. 





Size of Sewers. 


m 

s 

.s 

a 


Public Connec- 
tions, Decem- 
ber 31, 1913. 


Special, Connections. 


City or Town. 


Character or Location of 
Connection. 


.3d 

.2 

(-■'■+3 

S a 


Belmont, 1 
Wakefield, i . 
Revere, . 


4'0"to3'0", .- . 


0.048 


3 
1 

2 


- 


- 




62. 467 2 


278 


492 



1 The Metropolitan sewer extends but a few feet into the towns of Belmont and Wakefield. 

2 Includes 2.787 miles of Mystic valley sewer in Medford, Winchester and Woburn, running parallel with 
the Metropolitan sewer. 

South Metropolitan Sewerage System. 
Location, Length and Sizes of Sewers with Public and Special Connections. 



■ 




8 


nnec- 
ecem- 
913. 


Special Connections. 






S d 


City or Town. 


Size of Sewers. 


.s 


! CC 
3, D 

31, 1 


Character or Location of 


.2 

© c3 






bfl 

a 

as 


ublic 
tion 
ber 


Connection. 


S a 
3o 






i-l 


Ph 




y A 








r 


Tufts Medical School, . 


1 


Boston: — 
Back Bay, . 






1 


Private house, 


1 


6' 6" to 3' 9", 


1.500 1 


14 


Administration Building, 
Boston Park Department, 


1 








- 


Simmons College buildings, . 


1 








{ 


Art Museum, .... 


2 


Brighton, 


5' 9"X6' 0" to 12", . 


6.010 2 


14 


Abattoir, .... 
Chocolate works, . 
Machine shop, 


3 

2 
1 


Dorchester, . 


3'X4' to 2' 6"X2' 7", . 


2.8703 


13 | 

I 


Paper mill, .... 
Private buildings, . 
Edison Electric Company Sta- 
tion, ..... 


1 
3 

1 


Hyde Park, 


10'7"X11'7" to4'0"X4' 1", 


4.527 


"{ 


Mattapan Paper Mills, . 
Private building, . 


1 

2 


Roxbury, 


6' 6"X7", 4' 0", 


1.430 




- 


- 








r 


Parental School, 


1 


West Roxbury, . 


9'3"X10'2"to 12", , 


7.600 


13 


Lutheran Evangelical Church, 
Private buildings, . 


1 

4 


Brookline, 


6'6"X7'0"to8", 


2.540^ 


12 


Private buildings, . 


- 


Dedham, 


4'X4' 1" to 3' 9"X3' 10", . 


2.350 


7 


- - 


1 


Hull, 


60" pipe, .... 


0.750 


- 


- 


- 


Milton, . 


U'X12' to 8", 


3.600 


21 


Private buildings, . 


2 


Newton, 


4' 2"X4' 9" to 1' 3", . 


2.911 


6 


Private houses, 


6 


Quincy, . 


ll'3"X12'6"to24"pipe, . 


6.580 


u { 


Metropolitan Water Works 
blow-off, .... 


1 


Waltham , 


3'6"X4'0",. 


0.001 


1 

f 


Factories, .... 


2 


Watertown, 


4' 2"X4' 9" to 12", . 


0.7505 


5 I 


Stanley Motor Carriage Co., . 
Knights of Pythias building, 


1 

1 




43.419 


136 


04 



1 Includes .355 of a mile of sewer purchased from the city of Boston. 

2 Includes .446 of a mile of pipe and concrete sewers built for the use of the city of Boston; also .026 
of a mile of sewer purchased from the town of Watertown. 

3 Includes 1.24 miles of sewer purchased from the city of Boston. 

4 Includes .158 of a mile of pipe sewer built for the use of the town of Brookline. 
s Includes .025 of a mile of sewer purchased from the town of Watertown. 



104 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Information relating to areas, populations, local sewer connections 
and other data for the whole Metropolitan Sewerage District appears 
in the following table : — 



North Metropolitan District. 



Area 
(Square 
Miles). 



90.50 



Estimated 

Total 
Population. 



570,490 



Miles of 

Local Sewer 

connected. 



715.69 



Estimated 

Population 

contributing 

Sewage. 



510,040 



Patio of 

Contributing 

Population 

to Total 
Population 
(PerCent.). 



1.4 



Connections made 
with Metro- 
politan Sewers. 



Public. 



278 



Special. 



492 



South Metropolitan District. 


100.87 


393,390 


592.07 


262,990 


66.9 


136 


40 


Entire Metropolitan District. 


191.37 


963,880 


1,307.76 


773,030 


80.2 


414 


532 



Of the estimated gross population of 963,880 on December 31, 
1913, 773,030, representing 80.2 per cent., were on that date con- 
tributing sewage to the Metropolitan sewers, through a total length 
of 1,307.76 miles of local sewers owned by the individual cities and 
towns of the district. 

These sewers are connected with the Metropolitan System by 414 
public and 532 special connections. During the current year there 
has been an increase of 35.11 miles of local sewers connected with the 
Metropolitan System, and 13 public and 22 special connections have 
been added. 



CONSTRUCTION. 

NORTH METROPOLITAN SYSTEM. 

At the time of the last annual report one section only (67) of the 
new Mystic sewer, authorized by chapter 461 of the Acts of 1912, 
had been let under contract. The particulars of this section and 
contract are given in that report. 

Section 67 was completed on June 4, 1913. 

During the year contracts have been let on the remaining three 
sections. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 105 



Section 68. — North Metropolitan System. 

This section starts at the end of Section 67 in Grove Place, Win- 
chester, and extends through Grove Place and private land of George 
H. Fidler, then through the Metropolitan Park land along the east- 
erly side of the Aberjona River, crosses Bacon Street and passes 
through other land of the Metropolitan Park Commission to and 
through the Mystic Valley Parkway near its junction with Main 
Street, Winchester, then through other land of the Metropolitan 
Park Commission and private lands of Clara Joy and Esther R. Cut- 
ting and then through land of the town of Winchester to Mt. Vernon 
Street, a total length of 4,630 feet. 

In order to facilitate travel at Bacon Street and to save some 
large trees on the Metropolitan Park reservation, and also the re- 
taining wall where the sewer leaves the parkway, short tunnels were 
driven. 

The particulars of this section and contract are as follows : — 

Total length of section, 4,630 feet. 

Length of tunnel, 238 feet. 

Average depth of cut in open trench, 12 feet. 

Diameter of concrete sewers (circular) 54 inches and 48 inches. 

Name of contractor, G. M. Bryne Company. 

Date of contract No. 104, June 11, 1913. 

Date of completion of contract, December 31, 1913. 

Division Engineer in charge of construction, Henry T. Stiff. 

Assistant Engineer, A. F. F. Haskell. 

In constructing this sewer along the margin of the river it became 
necessary to change the drainage system of the Mystic Valley Park- 
way. To do this the drainage was collected and carried to a point 
near Station 29 + 90 and there taken under the sewer in a siphon 
consisting of one line of 24-inch cast-iron pipe and one line of 12- 
inch cast-iron pipe. One other drain was taken under the sewer by 
means of a siphon at Station 24 + 65. To accomplish this, 570 feet 
of 12-inch, 15-inch, 18-inch and 24-inch double strength Akron pipe 
were laid and 7 catch basins were constructed. A retaining wall 
was constructed between Station 28 + 63 and Station 29 + 97. 
Pile foundation was constructed from Station 27 + 20 to Station 30 
+ 20, extending under the retaining wall, and from Station 32 + 14 
to Station 35 + 42. Owing to the shallow cut no trench machines 



106 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

were used in the section except a platform derrick at the deeper 
portions. No excessive amount of ground water was encountered. 
Several excavations and refilling below grade were necessary. The 
masonry on this contract was completed' December 23, 1913, and 
there yet remains a small amount of grading and surfacing. 

Section 69. — North Metropolitan System. 

This section begins at the end of Section 68 at the southerly side 
of Mt. Vernon Street and extends through private property of David 
N. Skillings, then through land of the town of Winchester, then 
through a private way, then through other land of the town of Win- 
chester, then through private lands of John S. Lynam and Antonio 
Piluso and then through location of the Boston & Maine Railroad, 
crossing the railroad and the Aberjona River, to the beginning of 
Section 70. This section crosses Section 45 of the Metropolitan 
sewer, constructed in 1893, near Station 27 + 90. 

The contract was advertised and bids were opened on November 
19, 1913. The Board, however, decided to reject all bids and read- 
vertise, dividing the section into two contracts, one extending from 
Station to Station 23+0 and the other from Station 23 + to 
Station 49 + 69. The second opening of bids occurred on December 
17, and on December 31 the section was awarded to the Henry Spinach 
Contracting Company, the lowest bidders on both divisions of the 
section. 

Section 70. — North Metropolitan System. 

This section starts in the property of the Boston & Maine Rail- 
road near Section 45 of the Metropolitan sewer constructed in 1893, 
and extends through private land of Daniel J. Daly and in Cross 
Street to a point in the old Mystic sewer just within the Boston & 
Maine Railroad location at the line between the city of Woburn and 
the town of Winchester. Some particulars of this section and con- 
tract are as follows : — 

Total length of section, 3,535 feet. 

Average depth of cut, 14 feet. 

Dimensions of concrete sewer (oval), 24 inches x 36 inches. 

Name of contractor, Ross & Barbaro. 

Date of contract No. 103, April 9, 1913. 

Division Engineer in charge of construction, Henry T. Stiff. 

Assistant Engineer, A. F. F. Haskell. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. ' 107 

At the time of writing there remain to be constructed 300 feet of 
sewer. In the more shallow portions of the section no excavating 
machine was employed, but in the deeper part a trench machine, and 
in one rock cut a platform derrick were used. In the progress of 
the work a small amount of ground water has been found, and ex- 
cellent sand for concrete was obtained from the trench. The section 
will be completed early in the coming year. 

Section 30. — Noeth Metropolitan System. 
Arrangements were entered into between the President and Fel- 
lows of Harvard College and the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage 
Board for the reconstruction in a new location of a part of Section 30, 
Cambridge, extending from Station 26 + 18 to Station 32 + 90. 
This portion of the section was relocated about 20 feet to the north- 
ward for the purpose of permitting the construction of new dormitories 
for Harvard University. Following are the particulars of the work 
and the contract for the same : — 

Total length of new sewer constructed, 697 feet. 

Average depth of cut, 13 feet. 

Diameter of concrete sewer, 36 inches. 

Name of contractor, William J. Barry. 

Date of contract No. 102, May 1, 1913. 

Date of completion of contract, August 16, 1913. 

Division Engineer in charge of construction, Henry T. Stiff. 

Assistant Engineer, C. A. Moore. 

Total cost of reconstruction, including engineering and incidentals, $9,280.26. 

The Board permitted the construction of a service tunnel for use 
of the dormitories across the new location at Station 1 + 68. No 
excessive amount of ground water was encountered. Pile founda- 
tion was constructed from Station 6 + 34.4 to Station 6 + 55.4. 
The entire cost of the reconstruction of this section was repaid to the 
Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board by Harvard College. 

Section 48 A. — North Metropolitan System. 

The 10-inch Metropolitan sewer constructed in Boston Avenue in 
1895 for the purpose of conveying the sewage from a part of Medford 
across a small portion of Somerville had become inadequate to care 
for the sewage from this district. At the solicitation of the city of 
Medford, the Legislature, by chapter 377 of the Acts of 1913, au- 



108 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

thorized the construction of an additional sewer at this location. 
This chapter carried no appropriation, and the sewer was constructed 
out of construction funds already in the hands of the Board. 
The particulars of this section and contract are as follows : — 

Total length of section, 560 feet. 

Average depth of cut, 8 feet. 

Dimensions of Akron pipe sewer, 15 inches reinforced bjr concrete. 

Name of contractor, Antony Cefalo. 

Date of contract No. 105, July 1, 1913. 

Date of completion of contract, August 23, 1913. 

Division Engineer in charge of construction, Henry T. Stiff. 

Assistant Engineer, A. F. F. Haskell. 

Screening Machinery at East Boston Pumping Station. 
Chapter 461 of the Acts of 1912 authorized the renewal and en- 
largement of the screening plant at the East Boston pumping station. 
During the latter part of 1912 a new by-pass was constructed, also 
a new screen chamber. The contract for the construction of a new 
screen building was awarded December 26, 1912, as described in the 
twelfth annual report. During the present year the new screen 
building has been completed at a contract cost of $4,700. A con- 
tract for the construction of the screening machinery was awarded 
early in the year. The particulars of this contract are as follows: — 

Date of contract No. 101, February 1, 1913. 

Name of contractor, New England Structural Company. 

Price for constructing screens and framework for supporting the machinery, 

$5,842. 

Owing to delay of the contracting firm, partly due to difficulty in 
obtaining necessary material, the screens and other items under the 
contract were not delivered until about the middle of July. The 
design and construction of the electric drives for the screens and 
all erecting of screens and framework were done by this department. 
The southerly set of screens was put in operation on November 18, 
and has been very satisfactory. The old screens have been re- 
moved, and at the present time work is in progress in changing the 
old screen chamber to fit the new conditions. The remaining dupli- 
cate set of screens will be in operation early in the coming year. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 109 

MAINTENANCE. 

Scope of Work and Force Employed. 

The maintenance of the Metropolitan Sewerage System includes 
the operation of 7 pumping stations, the Nut Island screen-house 
and 105.886 miles of Metropolitan sewers, receiving the discharge 
from 1,307.76 miles of town and city sewers at 414 points, together 
with the care and study of inverted siphons under streams and in 
the harbor. 

The permanent maintenance force includes 167 men of whom 104 
are employed on the North System and 63 on the South System. 
These are subdivided as follows: engineers and other employees at 
the pumping stations, North Metropolitan System, 64; and on main- 
tenance, care of sewer lines, buildings and grounds, 40 men, includ- 
ing foremen; South Metropolitan System, 34 engineers and other 
employees within the pumping stations; and 29 men, including fore- 
men, on maintenance, care of sewer lines, buildings and grounds. 

The regular work of this department, in addition to the operation 
of the pumping stations, has consisted of routine work of cleaning 
and inspecting sewers and siphons, caring for tide gates, regulators 
and overflows, measuring flow in sewers, inspection of connections 
with the Metropolitan sewers, care of pumping stations and other 
buildings and grounds, and the maintenance of the ferry at Shirley 
Gut for transporting employees and supplies in connection with the 
operation of the Deer Island pumping station. 

Grade Crossing at Medford Street, Somerville, Fitchburg 
Division of the Boston & Maine Railroad. 

This work which was done by the Boston & Maine Railroad, as 
described in the twelfth annual report, required careful inspection to 
protect the Metropolitan sewer. It was largely completed in the 
preceding year, and during the present year it has been fully com- 
pleted. The 4-foot local combined sewer in Medford Street which 
was connected temporarily with the Metropolitan sewer, was dis- 
connected on January 13, 1913, and the sewage turned through its 
former channel. The necessary inspection was furnished from the 
maintenance force. 



110 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



Grade Crossing at Orient Heights, Boston, Revere Beach & 

Lynn Railroad. 
At the beginning of the year this work, which was done by the 
Boston, Revere Beach & Lynn Railroad, was about half completed. 
During the present year the work has been completed and the re- 
inforced concrete arch over the . Metropolitan sewer has been ex- 
tended to Station 34 + 70, Section 8, North Metropolitan sewer. 
To protect the interests of the Board inspectors from the mainte- 
nance force were furnished. 

Deer Island Pumping Station and Dwelling. 
The 4-tenement dwelling house at Deer Island for use of employees 
in the station has been supplied with steam-heating apparatus 
during the year. Steam is supplied from the boilers of the station. 
This work was done by the maintenance employees. 

East Boston Pumping Station. 
The interior walls of the older part of the engine room of the 
East Boston pumping station, which were damaged during the 
Chelsea fire, have been covered with a cement surface placed on 
metal lathing secured to the brickwork, and have been finished in 
imitation of brickwork to correspond with the new portion of the 
engine room. The ironwork inside and outside of the building has 
been painted during the year. This work was done by the main- 
tenance employees. 

Charlestown Pumping Station. 

During the year a new concrete floor has been placed in the boiler 
room and also one in the machine shop. The interior of the station 
has been cleaned and painted throughout. This work was done by 
the maintenance employees. 

Alewife Brook Pumping Station. 
During the year the stable and locker building has been newly 
shingled, and at the present time the interior of the pumping station 
is being cleaned and painted. This work was done by the mainte- 
nance employees. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. Ill 



Shirley Gut Siphon. 

The action of the sewer gases on the masonry structure at the 
northerly side of Shirley Gut destroyed the Portland cement mortar, 
and it has been necessary to take down and reline a considerable por- 
tion of the sand catcher and head house. This work was done by 
the maintenance employees. 

Ward Street Pumping Station. 

At the Ward Street pumping station the only method of delivering 
coal is by team. A 20-ton auto truck scale has been installed in the 
yard for the purpose of weighing coal as delivered at the station. 
The scale, which was furnished by the Fairbanks Company at a cost 
of $437.60, is connected with a beam inside of the station. The 
construction of the concrete scale pit and all other incidental work 
was done by the maintenance employees. 

Nut Island Screen-house. 

The dwelling house at Hough's Neck, Quincy, owned by the Com- 
monwealth and occupied by the engineer in charge of the Nut 
Island screen-house, has been newly shingled and otherwise re- 
paired. This work was done by the maintenance employees. 

Drainage from Tanneries, Gelatine and Glue Works in Win- 
chester, WOBURN AND StONEHAM. 

Five men and a foreman have been employed during a part of the 
year in flushing and cleaning the Metropolitan sewer through the 
tannery districts of Winchester, Woburn and Stoneham. 

All the tanneries and glue works of the district now have settling 
tanks of substantial size. This method of treatment has very greatly 
reduced the amount of sludge material entering the Metropolitan 
sewers and has materially lessened the cost of maintenance of the 
sewers in this district. 

The following table gives details of settling tanks introduced to 
date, showing the operations of same with the amount of sludge col- 
lected and removed : — 



112 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Table of Semi-fluid Sludge removed from Settling Basins at the Tanneries, Gela- 
tine and Glue Works in Winchester, Woburn and Stoneham. 











a> 
,253 

Oi-I 


.4,"Oco 
a> 5-t-i 
"I- 


ni-fluid 
during 
(Cubic 


Location of Basin. 


Basin put in 
Operation. 


Inside 
Measure- 
ment 
of Basin 
(Feet). 


00 t-i 

r" © 
■S3 

-°-§ 

S3 
3T3 


Average Quantity 
fluid Sludge r 
during the yee 
(Cubic Yards). 


Total Quantity Sei 
Sludge removed 
the Year 1913 
Yards). 


Beggs & Cobb Company, Basin No. 1, 


Jan. 15, 


1910 


47.0 X 23.0 


5 


136.00 


680.00 


Beggs & Cobb Company, Basin No. 2, 


May 9, 


1910 


47.0 X 23.0 


5 


125.60 


627.80 


Beggs & Cobb Company, Basin No. 3, 


Oct. 19, 


1911 


51.0 X 25.0 


3 


160.40 


481.20 


American Hide and Leather Company, 

Factory E. 
American Hide and Leather Company, 

Factory D. 
Cottle Leather Company, . . 


Aug. 1, 
Nov. 15, 
July 15, 


1910 
1910 
1910 


48.3 X 23.0 
48.0 X 23.1 
49.0 X 23.2 


1 
5 
1 


69.80 
140.00 
125.30 


69.88 
700.00 
125.30 


B. F. Kimball & Co., 


Dec. 10, 


1910 


47.2 X 23.0 


2V 2 


117.50 


293.82 


E. Cummings Leather Company, 


Nov. 1, 


1910 


45.9 X 22.6 


4 


77.30 


309.10 


W. P. Fox & Sons 


July 12, 


1910 


47.8 X 22.6 


2 


135.20 


270.40 


T. F. Boyle & Co., 


Sept. 15, 


1910 


48.1 X 23.1 


1 


104.86 


104.86 


Champion Tanning Company, . 


Jan. 9, 


1911 


46.8 X 22.9 


5V 2 


97.70 


537.32 


Stoneham Tanning Company, . 


May 1, 


1911 


43.8 X 19.5 


{26 


6.00 
51.00 


156.00 
51.00 


American Glue Company, 


Oct. 1, 


1910 


47.1 X 23.0 


3 


136.40 


409.08 


Winchester Manufacturing Company, 


1902 


/ 

I 


35.5 X 24.7 
67.2 X 12.0 


) « 


61.10 


305.78 


Total, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


5,016.68 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



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No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



115 



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116 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



PUMPING STATIONS. 

Capacity and Results. 

It will be noticed that the pumping expense per million foot- 
gallons in the three large stations of the North System is slightly in 
excess of last year. This is due principally to the increase in the 
engineers' salaries in these stations, which amounted to approxi- 
mately 12 per cent, extending over most of the year. The remaining 
stations show a slight decrease in the cost per million foot-gallons. 

The following tables summarize the pumping records for the year 
for the Metropolitan sewerage stations : — 

Average Daily Volume of Sewage lifted at Each of the Six Principal Metropolitan 
Pumping Stations and the Quincy Sewage Lifting Station during the Year, 
as compared with the Corresponding Volumes for the Previous Year. 





Average Daily Pumpage. 


PUMPING STATION. 


Jan. 1, 1912, to 
Dec. 31, 1912. 


Jan. 1, 1913, to 
Dec. 31, 1913. 


Increase during the 
Year. 


Deer Island, 


Gallons. 
55,700,000 


Gallons. 
56,600,000 


Gallons. 
900,000 


Per Cent. 
1.6 


East Boston, 


53,700,000 


54,600,000 


900,000 


1.7 


Charlestown, 


34,600,000 


33,700,000 


900,0001 


2.6 1 


Alewife Brook, 


3,446,000 


3,614,000 


168,000 


4.9 


Quincy, 


3,958,000 


4,154,000 


196,000 


5.0 


Ward Street (actual gallons pumped), 


26,258,000 


27,056,000 


798,000 


3.0 


Quincy sewage lifting station, 


48,000 


68,700 


20,700 


43.1 



1 Decrease. 



North Metropolitan System. 
Deer Island Pumping Station. 
At this station are four submerged centrifugal pumps with im- 
pellers or wheels 8.25 feet in diameter, driven by triple-expansion 
engines of the Reynolds-Corliss type. 

Contract capacity of 1 pump: 100,000,000 gallons, with 19-foot lift. 

Contract capacity of 3 pumps: 45,000,000 gallons each, with 19-foot lift. 

Average duty for the year: 55,300,000 foot-pounds. 

Average quantity raised each day: 56,600,000 gallons. 

Force employed: 4 engineers, 1 relief engineer, 4 firemen, 3 oilers, 3 screenmen, 

1 relief screenman and 1 laborer. 
Coal used: New River, costing from $3.91 to $4.62 per gross ton. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



117 



Table of Approximate Quantities, Lifts and Duties at the Deer Island Pumping 
Station of the North Metropolitan System. 



Months. 


Total 
Pumpage 
(Gallons). 


Average 
per Day 
(Gallons). 


Minimum 

Day 
(Gallons). 


Maximum 

Day • 
(Gallons). 


Average 

Lift 

(•Feet). 


Average ' 
Duty (ft.-lbs. 
per 100 lbs. 
Coal). 


1913 

January, . 




1,842,000,000 


59,400,000 


45,100,000 


101,300,000 


10.79 


53,500,000 


February, 






1,475,800,000 


52,700,000 


41,900,000 


87,700,000 


10.65 


49,800,000 


March, 






2,001,400,000 


64,600,000 


47,800,000 


112,300,000 


10.51 


49,600,000 


April, 






2,323,600,000 


77,500,000 


59,000,000 


123,700,000 


11.24 


59,000,000 


May, 






1,812,900,000 


58,500,000 


44,600,000 


87,900,000 


10.59 


58,300,000 


June, 






1,562,200,000 


52,100,000 


43,400,000 


60,100,000 


10.27 


53,500,000 


July, 






1,432,700,000 


46,200,000 


33,800,000 


64,300,000 


10.54 


56,000,000 


August, . 






1,418,000,000 


45,700,000 


34,800,000 


58,500,000 


10.42 


54,800,000 


September, 






1,370,600,000 


45,700,000 


34,600,000 


65,300,000 


10.63 


58,200,000 


October, . 




-. 


1,946,900,000 


62,800,000 


46,500,000 


103,900,000 


11.47 


59,900,000 


November, 






1,621,700,000 


54,100,000 


44,600,000 


95,400,000 


11.68 


• 57,800,000 


December, 






1,846,100,000 


59,600,000 


45,500,000 


112,800,000 


11.06 


52,800,000 


Total, 


20,654,200,000 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Average, 






- 


56,600,000 


43,500,000 


89,400,000 


10.82 


55,300,000 



Average Cost per Million Foot-gallons for Pumping at the Deer Island Station. 

Volume (20,654.2 Million Gallons) X Lift (10.82 Feet) = 223,478.4 Million Foot-gallons. 



Items. 




Cost per 
Million Foot- 
gallons. 



Labor, 

Coal, 

Oil 

Waste, 

Water, 

Packing 

Miscellaneous supplies and renewals, 

Totals, 

Labor at screens, .... 



$14,832 40 

9,689 25 

344.79 

167 96 

1,537 20 

169 48 

1,814 01 



$28,555 09 



.06637 
.04336 
.00154 
.00075 
.00688 
.00076 
.00812 



.12778 
.01366 



East Boston Pumping Station. 

At this station are four submerged centrifugal pumps, with im- 
pellers or wmeels 8.25 feet in diameter, driven by triple-expansion 
engines of the Reynolds-Corliss type. 



118 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Contract capacity of 1 pump : 100,000,000 gallons with 19-foot lift. 

Contract capacity of 3 pumps: 45,000,000 gallons each, with 19-foot lift. 

Average duty for the year: 65,400,000 foot-pounds. 

Average quantity raised each day: 54,600,000 gallons. 

Force employed: 4 engineers, 2 relief engineers, 4 firemen, 1 relief fireman, 3 

oilers, 3 screenmen, 1 relief screenman, 3 helpers and 1 laborer. 
Coal used: New River, costing from $3.92 to $4.51 per gross ton. 



Table of Approximate Quantities, Lifts and Duties at the East Boston Pumping 
Station of the North Metropolitan System. 



Months. 


Total 
Pumpage 
(Gallons). 


Average 
per Day 
(Gallons). 


Minimum 

Day 
(Gallons). 


Maximum 

Day 
(Gallons). 


Average 

Lift 
(Feet). 


Average 

Duty (ft.-lbs. 

per 100 lbs 

Coal). 


1913 

January, . 




1,780,300,000 


57,400,000 


43,100,000 


99,300,000 


14.94 


60,300,000 


February, 






1,419,800,000 


50,700,000 


39,900,000 


85,700,000 


14.86 


55,400,000 


March, 






1,939,400,000 


62,600,000 


45,800,000 


110,300,000 


15.36 


65,900,000 


April, 






2,263,600,000 


75,500,000 


57,000,000 


121,700,000 


15.37 


69,900,000 


May, 






1,750,900,000 


56,500,000 


42,600,000 


85,900,000 


15.18 


76,500,000 


June, 






1,502,200,000 


50,100,000 


41,400,000 


58,100,000 


14.92 


70,400,000 


July, 






1,370,700,000 


44,200,000 


31,800,000 


62,300,000 


14.61 


62,200,000 


August, . 






1,356,000,000 


43,700,000 


32,800,000 


56,500,000 


14.95 


71,300,000 


September, 






1,310,600,000 


43,700,000 


32,600,000 


63,300,000 


15.21 


66,700,000 


October, . 






1,884,900,000 


60,800,000 


44,500,000 


101,900,000 


18.56 


52,000,000 


November, 






1,561,700,000 


52,100,000 


42,600,000 


93,400,000 


15.86 


67,800,000 


December, 






1,784,100,000 


57,600,000 


43,500,000 


110,800,000 


14.98 


66,900,000 


Total, 


19,924,200,000 


- 


- 


- 


- 


' - 


Average, 






- 


54,600,000 


41,500,000 


87,400,000 


15.40 


65,400,000 



Average Cost per Million Foot-gallons for Pumping at the East Boston Station. 

Volume (19,924.2 Million Gallons) X Lift (15.40 Feet) = 306,832.7 Million Foot-gallons. 



Items. 




Cost per 
Million Foot- 
gallons. 



Labor, . . . . 

Coal, 

Oil, . ... 

Waste, 

Water, 

Packing, 

Miscellaneous supplies and renewals, 

Totals 

Labor at screens, .... 



520,481 78 

11,437 98 

416 69 

116 96 

2,476 56 

87 02 

2,622 41 



137,639 40 



$0.06676 
.03728 
.00136 
.00038 
.00807 
.00028 
.00855 



$0.12268 
.01001 






No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD, 



119 



Charlestown Pumping Station. 
At this station are three submerged centrifugal pumps, two of 
them having impellers or wheels, 7.5 feet in diameter, the other 8.25 
feet in diameter. They are driven by triple-expansion engines of 
the Reynolds-Corliss type. 

Contract capacity of 1 pump: 60,000,000 gallons with 8-foot lift. 

Contract capacity of 2 pumps: 22,000,000 gallons each, with 11-foot lift. 

Average duty for the year: 45,900,000 foot-pounds. 

Average quantity raised each day: 33,700,000 gallons. 

Force employed: 4 engineers, 1 relief engineer, 4 firemen, 3 oilers, 3 screenmen 

and 1 relief screenman. 
Coal used: New River and Pocahontas, costing from $3.93 to $4.57 per gross ton. 



Table of Approximate Quantities, Lifts and Duties at the Charlestown Pumping 
Station of the North Metropolitan System. 



Months. 


Total 
Pumpage 
(Gallons). 


Average 
per Day 
(Gallons). 


Minimum 
Day 

(Gallons). 


Maximum 

Day 
(Gallons). 


Average 

Lift 
(Feet). 


Average 

Duty (ft.-lbs. 

per 100 lbs. 

Coal). 


1913 

January, . 




1,086,700,000 


35,100,000 


28,400,000 


50,400,000 


8.34 


45,200,000 


February, 






965,900,000 


34,500,000 


27,300,000 


55,800,000 


8.22 


45,500,000 


March, 






1,162,400,000 


37,500,000 


23,900,000 


64,800,000 


8.33 


50,100,000 


April, 






1,219,400,000 


40,600,000 


30,700,000 


65,500,000 


8.45 


52,700,000 


May, 






1,036,000,000 


34,500,000 


27,100,000 


52,100,000 


7.91 


46,500,000 


June, 






1,105,700,000 


36,900,000 


30,800,000 


48,400,000 


8.63 


61,300,000 


July, 






932,100,000 


30,100,000 


23,700,000 


39,900,000 


7.99 


43,900,000 


August, . 






1,089,700,000 


35,200,000 


25,000,000 


43,600,000 


8.19 


51,400,000 


September, 






879,700,000 


29,300,000 


21,600,000 


44,600,000 


7.68 


41,300,000 


October, . 






1,030,400,000 


, 33,200,000 


18,000,000 


47,900,000 


8.27 


42,600,000 


November, 






857,400,000 


28,600,000 


20,700,000 


49,500,000 


8.06 


36,900,000 


December, 






911,500,000 


29,400,000 


21,500,000 


55,200,000 


7.81 


33,200,000 


Total, 


12,276,900,000 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Average, 






- 


33,700,000 


24,900,000 


51,500,000 


8.16 


45,900,000 



120 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Average Cost per Million Foot-gallons for Pumping at the Charlestown Station. 

Volume (12,276.9 Million Gallons) X Lift (8.16 Feet) = 100,179.5 Million Foot-gallons. 



Items. 




Cost per 
Million Foot- 
gallons. 



Labor, 

Coal, 

Oil 

Waste, 

Water, 

Packing, 

Miscellaneous supplies and renewals, 

Totals 

Labor at screens, .... 



$13,662 66 

4,511 20 

137 92 

92 12 

657 60 

40 77 

955 04 



$20,057 31 



.13638 
.04504 
.00138 
.00092 
.00656 
.00041 
.00953 



.20022 
.03060 



Alewije Brook Pumping Station. 
The plant at this station consists of the original installation of 
small commercial pumps and engines, i.e., two 9-inch Andrews verti- 
cal centrifugal pumps, with direct-connected compound marine en- 
gines, together with the recent addition. The latter consists of a 
specially designed engine of the vertical cross-compound type, having 
between the cylinders a centrifugal pump rotating on a horizontal 
axis. 

Contract capacity of the two original pumps: 4,500,000 gallons each, with 13- 
foot lift. 
Contract capacity of new pump: 13,000,000 gallons, with 13-foot lift. 
Average duty for the year: 18,100,000 foot-pounds. 
Average quantity raised each day: 3,614,000 gallons. 

Force employed: 3 engineers, 1 relief engineer, 3 screenmen and 1 relief screenman. 
Coal used: New River, costing from $4.48 to $5.06 per gross ton. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



121 



Table of Approximate Quantities, Lifts and Duties at the Mewife Brook Pump- 
ing Station of the North Metropolitan System. 



Months. 


Total 
Pumpage 
(Gallons). 


Average 
per Day 
(Gallons). 


Minimum 
Day 

(Gallons). 


Maximum 
Day 

(Gallons). 


Average 

Lift 
(Feet). 


Average 

Duty (ft.-lbs. 

per 100 lbs. 

Coal). 


1913 

January, . 




141,136,000 


4,553,000 


3,526,000 


6,813,000 


12.70 


19,400,000 


February, 






105,742,000 


3,777,000 


3,028,000 


6,012,000 


12.24 


17,200,000 


March, 






158,996,000 


5,129,000 


3,478,000 


7,934,000 


12.53 


20,900,000 


April, 






181,698,000 


6,057,000 


4,738,000 


7,698,000 


12.70 


25,800,000 


May, 






126,111,000 


4,068,000 


3,028,000 


5,818,000 


12.56 


19,500,000 


June, 






94,797,000 


3,160,000 


2,414,000 


4,085,000 


12.92 


18,100,000 


July, 






74,878,000 


2,415,000 


1,952,000 


3,430,000 


13.01 


16,200,000 


August, . 






69,178,000 


2,232,000 


1,784,000 


3,179,000 


12.96 


15,800,000 


September, 






65,298,000 


2,177,000 


1,784,000 


3,028,000 


12.98 


14,500,000 


October, . 






100,837,000 


3,253,000 


2,120,000 


6,012,000 


12.91 


17,400,000 


November, 
December, 






89,123,000 


2,971,000 


2,456,000 


5,170,000 


13.01 


16,000,000 






110,967,000 


3,580,000 


2,928,000 


5,947,000 


12.88 


16,800,000 


Total, 


1,318,761,000 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Average, 






- 


3,614,000 


2,770,000 


5,427,000 


12.78 


18,100,000 



Average Cost per Million Foot-gallons for Pumping at the Alewife Brook Station. 

Volume (1,318.761 Million Gallons) X Lift (12.78 Feet) = 16,853.8 Million Foot-gallons. 



Items. 




Cost per 
Million Foot- 
gallons. 



Labor 

Coal, 

Oil 

Waste, 

Water, 

Packing, 

Miscellaneous supplies and renewals, 

Totals 

Labor at screens, oiling and miscellaneous services, 



56,495 27 

1,732 00 

134 93 

91 88 

207 72 

21 86 

306 96 



$8,990 62 



.38539 
. 10277 
.00801 
.00545 
.01232 
.00130 
.01821 



.53345 
.11110 



122 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



* South Metropolitan System. 

Ward Street Pumping .Station. 
At this station are two vertical, triple-expansion pumping engines, 
of the Allis-Chalmers type, operating reciprocating pumps, the 
plungers of which are 48 inches in diameter with a 60-inch stroke. 

Contract capacity of 2 pumps: 50,000,000 gallons each, with 45-foot lift. 

Average duty for the year: 84,217,000 foot-pounds. 

Average quantity raised each day: 27,056,000 gallons. 

Force employed: 4 engineers, 1 relief engineer, 4 firemen, 4 oilers, 4 assistant 

engineers, 1 machinist and 1 laborer. 
Coal used: New River, costing from $4.23 to $5.13 per gross ton. 
Material intercepted at screens during the year, 1,170 cubic yards. 



Table of Approximate Quantities, Lifts and Duties at the Ward Street Pumping 
Station of the South Metropolitan System. 



Months. 


Total 
Pumpage 
(Gallons). 


Average 
per Day 
(Gallons). 


Minimum 
Day 

(Gallons). 


Maximum 

Day 
(Gallons). 


Average 

Lift 
(Feet). 


Average 

Duty (ft.-lbs. 

per 100 lbs. 

Coal). 


1913 

January, . 




867,261,000 


28,008,000 


24,017,000 


35,562,000 


40.63 


79,000,000 


February, 






720,994,000 


25,750,000 


22,746,000 


41,288,000 


40.76 


82,500,000 


March, 






1,023,342,000 


33,013,000 


24,261,000 


58,214,000 


41.64 


88,700,000 


April, 






1,243,097,000 


41,432,000 


31,250,000 


50,082,000 


42.25 


100,500,000 


May, 






914,397,000 


29,496,000 


24,513,000 


38,030,000 


41.46 


92,400,000 


June, 






729,936,000 


24,330,000 


19,423,000 


29,801,000 


40.77 


84,600,000 


July, 






655,540,000 


21,113,000 


17,429,000 


28,263,000 


40.47 


81,700,000 


August, . 






659,927,000 


21,352,000 


18,150,000 


29,879,000 


41.36 


84,600,000 


September, 






620,930,000 


20,670,000 


17,889,000 


30,059,000 


40.59 


70,700,000 


October, . 






797,624,000 


25,730,000 


19,651,000 


44,319,000 


41.33 


76,200,000 


November, 






769,725,000 


25,657,000 


21,773,000 


40,474,000 


41.35 


80,600,000 


December, 






871,916,000 


28,126,000 


23,021,000 


41,720,000 


41.50 


89,100,000 


Total, 


9,874,689,000 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Average, 






- 


27,056,000 


22,010,000 


39,590,000 


41.18 


84,217,000 



Records from plunger displacement. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



123 



Average Cost per Million Foot-gallons for Pumping at the Ward Street Station. 

Volume (9,874.7 Million Gallons) X Lift (41.18 Feet) = 406,640 Million Foot-gallons. 



Items. 




Cost per 
Million Foot- 
gallons. 



Labor, 

Coal, 

Oil 

Waste, 

Water, 

Packing, 

Miscellaneous supplies and renewals, 

Totals, 

Labor at screens, .... 



$16,906 67 

8,607 15 

206 72 

34 11 

1,389 60 

185 67 

2,227 50 



),557 42 



.04158 
.02117 
.00051 
.00008 
.00342 
.00046 
.00548 



.07270 
.00996 



Quincy Pumping Station. 

At this station are two compound condensing Deane pumping 
engines and one Lawrence centrifugal pump driven by a Sturtevant 
compound condensing engine. 

Contract capacity of 3 pumps: Deane, 3,000,000 gallons; Deane, 5,000,000 
gallons; Lawrence centrifugal, 10,000,000 gallons. 

Average duty for the year: 31,325,000 foot-pounds. 

Average quantity raised each day: 4,154,000 gallons. 

Force employed: 3 engineers, 1 relief engineer, 3 screenmen and 1 relief screen- 
man. 

Coal used: New River, costing from $4.45 to $4.65 per gross ton. 

Materials intercepted at screen during the year, 199 cubic yards. 



124 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Table of Approximate Quantities, Lifts and Duties at the Quincy Pumping Station 

of the South Metropolitan System. 



Months. 


Total 
Pumpage 
(Gallons). 


Average 
per Day 
(Gallons). 


Minimum 

Day 
(Gallons). 


Maximum 
Day 

(Gallons). 


Average 

Lift 
(Feet). 


Average 

Duty (ft.-lbs. 

per 100 lbs. 

Coal). 


1913 

January, . 




147,279,000 


4,751,000 


4,206,000 


5,547,000 


21.72 


31,600,000 


February, 






113,031,000 


4,037,000 


3,395,000 


5,126,000 


21.03 


29,000,000 


March, 






176,460,000 


5,692,000 


4,512,000 


8,650,000 


22.86 


34,000,000 


April, 






210,472,000 


7,016,000 


5,254,000 


13,915,000 


28.01 


35,100,000 


May, 






143,034,000 


4,614,000 


4,065,000 


5,600,000 


21.77 


27,700,000 


June, 






114,636,000 


3,821,000 


3,124,000 


4,996,000 


21.02 


30,600,000 


July, 






100,312,000 


3,236,000 


2,893,000 


3,601,000 


21.06 


31,700,000 


August, . 






91,157,000 


2,941,000 


2,507,000 


3,226,000 


21.10 


32,000,000 


September, 






82,941,000 


2,765,000 


2,355,000 


3,076,000 


21.06 


29,700,000 


October, . 






106,589,000 


3,438,000 


2,721,000 


4,587,000 


21.00 


31,100,000 


November, 






107,917,000 


3,597,000 


3,055,000 


3,959,000 


20.99 


32,300,000 


December, 






122,391,000 


3,948,000 


3,527,000 


4,944,000 


21.04 


31,100,000 


Total, 


1,516,219,000 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Average, . 






- 


4,154,000 


3,468,000 


5,602,000 


21.89 


31,325,000 



Average Cost per Million Foot-gallons for Pumping at the Quincy Station. 

Volume (1,516.2 Million Gallons) X Lift (21.89 Feet) = 33,190 Million Foot-gallons. 



Items. 


Cost. 


Cost per 
Million Foot- 
gallons. 


Labor, 


$6,400 00 


$0.19283 


Coal, 


1,813 18 


.05463 


Oil . 


39 69 


.00119 


Waste 


35 22 


.00106 


Water, 


230 89 


.00696 


Packing 


41 59 


.00125 


Miscellaneous supplies and renewals, 


478 02 


.01440 


Totals 


$9,038 59 


$0.27232 


Labor at screens, oiling and miscellaneous services, .... 


- 


.04686 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 125 



Nut Island Screen-house, 

The plant at this house includes two sets of screens in duplicate 
actuated by small reversing engines of the Fitchburg type. Two 
vertical Deane boilers, 80 horse-power each, operate the engines, pro- 
vide heat and light for the house, burn materials intercepted at the 
screens, and furnish power for the Quincy sewage lifting station. 

Average daily quantity of sewage passing screens, 53,020,000 gallons. 
Total materials intercepted at screens, 1,148.76 cubic yards. 
Materials intercepted per million gallons of sewage discharged, 1.60 cubic feet. 
Force employed: 3 engineers, 1 relief engineer, 3 screenmen and 1 relief screen- 
man. 
Coal used: New River, costing from $4.04 to $4.60 per gross ton. 

Quincy Sewage Lifting Station. 

At this station are two 6-inch submerged Lawrence centrifugal 
pumps with vertical shafts actuated by two Sturtevant direct-current 
motors. 

The labor and electric energy for this station are supplied from 
the Nut Island screen-house and as used at present it does not mate- 
rially increase the amount of coal used at the latter station. The 
effluent is largely ground water. 

Average daily amount pumped, 68,700 gallons. 
Average lift, 15.8 feet. 



126 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Coal delivered in the Bins of the Sewerage Works Pumping Stations during the Year. 



' 




Gross Tons, Bituminous Coal. 






M 

a 
ft 

a 



Ph 
d . 

oi O 

8 -*> 
Q 


g 
'ft 

a 

3 
Ph 

a 
o 

+3 — 
2 a 
O o- 

(3 


fcfi 

0. 
'ft 

a 


& . 

$ a 

« 2 
to "43 

"is J 


i 

ft 

a 



Ph 

8.2 
£& 

(13.9 

< 


a 
a 

a 

3 

Ph 

+3 

01 
02.2 

+3 


h 

+3 

w. 

a 
a 

a 


Pm 

>> . 

a 2 

'0'*> 


d 

<u 

M 
O 

W 

13 

a 

eg 

M s 

d 

43 O 
3rd 


d 

o 
H 

to 

03 

O 

o 

3 

a 

<o 
,° 

'C 
Ph 


Metropolitan Coal Company, 


137.700 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


$3 91 


Metropolitan Coal Company, 


353.520 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 98 


Metropolitan Coal Company, 


1,234.000 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4 62 


Metropolitan Coal Company, 


- 


284.303 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 92 


Metropolitan Coal Company, 


- 


589.300 


- 


- 


- 


- 


~ 


3 94 


Metropolitan Coal Company, 


- 


393.160 


- 


- 


- 


- 


" 


3 97 


Metropolitan Coal Company, 


- 


366.000 


- 


- 




- 


~ 


3 98 


Metropolitan Coal Company, 


- 


154.000 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4 00 


Metropolitan Coal Company, 


- 


235.000 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4 28 


Metropolitan Coal Company, 


- 


237.000 


- 


- 


- 


- 


" 


4 36 


Metropolitan Coal Company, 


- 


240.000 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4 40 


Metropolitan Coal Company, 


- 


361.000 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4 45 


Metropolitan Coal Company, 


- 


239.000 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4 51 


Metropolitan Coal Company, 


- 


- 


280.000 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 93 


Metropolitan Coal Company, 


- 


- 


228.000 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 99 


Metropolitan Coal Company, 


- 


- 


266.000 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4 32 


Metropolitan Coal Company, 


- 


- 


239.372 


- 


- 


- 


~ 


4 57 


Locke Coal Company, 


- 


- 


- 


18.107 


- 


- 


~ 


4 47 


Locke Coal Company, 




- 


- 


- 


57.960 


- 


- 


~ 


4 48 


Locke Coal Company, 




- 


- 


- 


37.060 


- 


- 


- 


4 49 


Locke Coal Company, 




- 


- 


- 


65.240 


- 


- 


- 


4 54 


Locke Coal Company, 




- 


- 


- 


46.230 


- 


- 


- 


4 56 


Locke Coal Company, 




- 


- 


- 


36.470 


- 


- 


- 


4 58 


Locke Coal Company, 




- 


- 


- 


45.285 


- 


- 


~ 


4 60 


Locke Coal Company, 




- 


- 


- 


23.200 


- 


- 


- 


4 96 


Locke Coal Company, 




- 


- 


- 


45.300 


- 


- 


- 


5 01 


Locke Coal Company, 




- 


- 


- 


73.776 


- 


- 


" 


5 06 


Metropolitan Coal Company, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


348.926 


- 


- 


4 23 


Metropolitan Coal Company, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


277.360 


- 


" 


4 25 


Metropolitan Coal Company, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


75.767 


- 


- 


4 26 


Metropolitan Coal Company, 


- 


T 


- 


- 


374.300 


- 


~ 


4 33 



Include adjustments for quality. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



127 



Coal delivered in the Bins of the Sewerage Works Pumping Stations during the Year 

■ — Concluded. 







Gross Tons, '. 


Bituminous Coal. 








a 

"a 

a 

3 
Ph 

a . 
""3 o 

%$ 

o>02 

Q 


g 

"ft 

a 

Ph 

a 
o 

■+■> -< 
cg a 
o o 

■*=>$ 

OS 02 
H 


bfi 
'ft 

a 

Ph 

* . 
-8 « 

* 2 
o> - 43 

O 


Alewife Brook Pump- 
ing Station. 


a 
'a . 

a 

Ph 

<a 

<o ■ 
u d 

M.2 

+3 

b3oQ 


■ 

02 
bO 

a 
'ft 

a 

Ph 
>> . 

8 fl 

9 ° 


Nut Island Screen- 
house. 


o 
H 

03 
CO 
O 

u 

o 

S-. 

a 

<D 

°C 
Ph 


Metropolitan Coal Company, 


1 " 


- 


- 


- 


155.910 


- 


- 


$4 37 


Metropolitan Coal Company, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


174.990 


- 


- 


4 98 


Metropolitan Coal Company, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


277.848 


- 


- 


5 06 


Metropolitan Coal Company, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


76.013 


- 


- 


5 07 


Metropolitan Coal Company, 


- 


- 


- • 


- 


222.071 


- 


- 


5 09 


Metropolitan Coal Company, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


131.240 


- 


- 


5 13 


City Fuel Company, . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


62.800 


-. 


4 45 


City Fuel Company, . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


27.401 


- 


4 48 


City Fuel Company, . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


61.180 


- 


4 57 


City Fuel Company, . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


65.174 


- 


4 61 


City Fuel Company, . 


- 


-. 


- 


- ' 


- 


134.379 


- 


4 65 


Frost Coal Company, . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


50.000 


- 


5 04 


Frost Coal Company, . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


9.250 


- 


5 10 


Metropolitan Coal Company, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


200 


4 04 


Metropolitan Coal Company, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


194 


4 60 


Metropolitan Coal Company, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


200 


4 70 


Total gross tons, 


2,964.520 


3,098,763 


1,013.372 


448.628 


2,114.425 


410.184 


594 


- 


Average price per gross ton, . 


$4 21 


U 146 


$4 196 


U 69 


$4 609 


$4 647 


$4 445 


- 



1 Include adjustments for quality. 



Metropolitan Sewerage Outfalls. 

The Deer Island outfall has been in continuous operation since 
May, 1895. 

The 60-inch outfall pipes on the South Metropolitan System have 
been in operation since October, 1904. 

These outfalls are in good condition and free from deposit. Dur- 
ing the year the average flow through the North Metropolitan out- 
fall at Deer Island has been 56,600,000 gallons of sewage per 24 
hours, with a maximum rate of 148,700,000 gallons on December 
26. The amount of sewage discharged in the North Metropolitan 



128 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. No. 57. 

District averaged 111 gallons per day for each person, taking the 
estimated population of the district contributing sewage. If the 
sewers in this district were restricted only to the admission of sewage 
proper, and all local sewers were separate sewers, this per capita 
amount would be considerably decreased. 

In the South Metropolitan District an average of 53,020,000 gal- 
lons of sewage has passed daily through the screens at the Nut Island 
screen-house, and has been discharged from the outfalls into the 
outer harbor. The maximum discharge per day, which occurred 
during a heavy storm on April 13, was 152,000,000 gallons. The 
discharge of sewage through these outfalls represents the amount 
of sewage contributed in the South Metropolitan System, which was 
at the rate of 202 gallons per day per person of the estimated number 
contributing sewage in the District. 

The daily discharge of sewage per capita is considerably larger in 
the South Metropolitan District than it is in the North Metropolitan 
District, because, owing to the large size of the High-level sewer, 
more storm water is admitted at periods of heavy rainfall. 

Material Intercepted at the Screens. • 

The material intercepted at the screens at the North Metropolitan 
Sewerage stations, consisting of rags, paper and other floating mate- 
rials, has during the year amounted to 4,056 cubic yards. This is 
equivalent to 5.3 cubic feet for each million gallons of sewage 
pumped at Deer Island. 

The material intercepted at the screens at the South Metropolitan 
Sewerage stations has amounted to 2,517.27 cubic yards, equal to 
3.51 cubic feet per million gallons of sewage delivered at the outfall 
works at Nut Island. 

Studies of the sewage flows indicate that the Metropolitan sewers 
and siphons are free from deposit. 

FREDERICK D. SMITH, 

Engineer of Sewerage Works. 

Boston, January 1, 1914. 



APPENDIX. 



130 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Appendix N o . 1 . 



Contracts made and pending 

[The details of contracts made before 1913 



1. 

Num- 
ber 
of Con- 
tract. 



10 



3122 



346 



3472 



350 2 



3512 



25-M2 



26-M 2 



27-M2 



28-M 2 



31-M 



WORK. 



Num- 
ber 
of 
Bids. 



40-million-gallon pumping 
engine. 

2 3-million-gallon pumping 
engines for Southern Ex- 
tra High Service pumping 
station. 



Southern Extra High Serv- 
ice pumping station. 

Furnishing and placing 
about 1,200 cubic yards of 
loam at Southern Extra 
High Service pumping 
station. 

400 tons cast-iron water 
pipe; 220 tons 24-inch, 80 
tons 30 : inch, 100 tons 36- 
inch pipe; and 50 tons 
special castings. 

Electric motor and centrif- 
ugal pump for Clinton 
sewerage pumping station. 

450 tons B. C. C. Miller vein 
coal for Arlington pump- 
ing station. 

1,000 tons Georges Creek 
Cumberland coal for Spot 
Pond pumping station. 

7,000 tons Sonman coal for 
Chestnut Hill pumping 
stations. 

450 tons C. C. B. New River 
coal for Arlington pump- 
ing station. 



En- 
gine 
No. 1, 
5. 
En- 
gine 
No. 2, 
7. 

10 



Amount of Bid. 



4. 

Next to 
Lowest. 



$105,700 00 
7,886 00 

8,825 OOV 
21,148 00 



11,965 00 

965 00i,3 
$4.30 per ton. 
$5.05 per ton. 
$3.80 per ton. 



5. 

Lowest. 



599,769 00 1 
7,525 00 1 

8,738 00 
19,984 OQi 



$1.30! per cu. 
yd. 



$11,950 OQi 



786 00 



4.241 per 
ton. 



4.80 1 per 
ton. 



3.79i per 
ton. 



4.38i per 
ton. 



6. 

Contractor. 



Holly Mfg. Co., Buf- 
falo, N. Y. 

Laidlaw-Dunn-Gordon 
Co., Cincinnati, O. 



A. Varnerin Company, 
Boston. 

T. H. Corrigan, Bos- 
ton. 



Florence Iron Works, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 



Power Equipment Co., 
Boston. 



Bader Coal Co., Bos- 
ton. 



Locke Coal Co., Mai- 
den. 



Gorman-Leonard Coal 
Co., Worcester. 



Bader Coal Co., Bos- 
ton. 



1 Contract based upon this bid. 



2 Contract completed. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



131 



Appendix No. 1. 



DURING THE YEAR 1913. 

have been given in previous reports.] 



Date of Con- 
tract. 



8. 

Date of 

Completion 

of Work. 



9, 



Prices of Principal Items of Contracts 
made in 1913. 



10. 

Value of Work 

done 
Dec. 31, 1913. 



Sept. 21, 1909 
Sept. 18, 1911 



Mar. 28, 1912 
Dec. 30, 1912 

Mar. 5, 1913 

May 31, 1912 
June 3, 1912 
June 5, 1912 
June 3, 1912 
June 25, 1913 



Jan. 


29, 


1913 


Jan. 


16, 


1913 


Nov. 


10, 


1913 


July 


24, 


1913 


July 


24, 


1913 


Feb. 


26, 


1913 


May 


3, 


1913 


May 


29, 


1913 



For pipe, $23 per ton of 2,000 pounds; for special 
castings, $55 per ton of 2,000 pounds. 



Aug. 7, 1913 



1.38 per ton of 2,240 pounds delivered on cars at 
the Arlington station. 



$99,769 00 
18,585 20 



20,962 13 
2,810 60 

12,115 34 

965 00 

1,950 54 

4,765 88 

26,651 20 

1,201 10 



10 



3 Efficiency considered, this was lowest bid. 



132 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Contracts made and pending 



11 



12 



13 



14 



15 



16 



17 



18 



19 



20 



21 



22 



Num- 
ber 
of Con- 
tract. 



2. 

WORK. 



Num- 
ber 
of 
Bids. 



32-M 



33-M 



Special 2 
Order. 



Special 2 
Order. 



Special 2 
Order. 



Special 2 
Order. 



Special 2 
Order. 



Special 2 
Order. 



Special 2 
Order 



Special 2 
Order. 



Special 2 
Order. 



Special 2 
Order. 



750 tons Georges Creek 
Cumberland or New 
River coal for Spot Pond 
pumping station. 

5,000 tons Beaver Run coal 
for Chestnut Hill pump- 
ing stations; 300 tons Bea- 
ver Run coal for Hyde 
Park pumping station, 
and 85 tons Beaver Run 
coal for Pegan pumping 
station. 



Plumbing in lavatory and 
locker room at Chestnut 
Hill pumping station. 

Electric light installation 
at Hyde Park pumping 
station. 

Furnishing and erecting fer- 
rolithic plate, plastering 
and concrete floor of lava- 
tory and locker room at 
Chestnut Hill pumping 
station. 

2,250 feet 9-inch by 9-inch J. 
C. Edwards red tile for 
engine room floor at Hyde 
Park pumping station. 

1 Fitzhenry-Gu ptill Co. 
standard "A" power 
sprayer; 1 Fitzhenry-Gu p- 
till Co. power truck spray- 
er, less commercial body. 

Cast-iron floor plates for 
Hyde Park pumping sta- 
tion. 

Laying tile floor in engine 
room of Hyde Park pump- 
ing station. 

Painting and varnishing at 
the Chestnut Hill pump- 
ing stations. 

Artificial stone walks at 
Hyde Park pumping sta- 
tion. 

Painting and varnishing at 
Spot Pond pumping sta- 
tion. 



Chest- 
nut 
Hill 
sta- 
tions, 

3. 
Hyde 
Park 
sta- 
tion, 

4. 
Pegan 
sta- 
tion, 
3. 



Amount of Bid. 



Next to 
Lowest. 



i.02 1 per 
ton. 



&4.17 1 per 
ton. 



$4.24 » per 
ton. 



5. 

Lowest. 



$375 00 



480 00 



693 00 



416 25 i 



275 00 



280 00 



600 00 



476 00 



367 00 



$5.30* per ton. 



.97 per ton. 



.12 per ton. 



.19 per ton. 



$340 00 ! 



457 00 » 



540 00 1 



416 251 



220 00 i 



220 00 i 



568 001 



475 00 i 



300 00 * 



6. 

Contractor. 



Locke Coal Co., Mai- 
den. 



Gorman-Leonard Coal 
Co., Worcester. 



H. W. Orr Company, 
Newtonville. 



James Wilkinson Com- 
pany, Boston. 

Robert Gallagher Com- 
pany, Boston. 



L. L. Rinaldi &> Co., 
Boston. 



Fitzhenry-Guptill 
Co., Boston. 



Becker Milling Ma- 
chine Co., Boston. 



Galassi Mosaic & Tile 
Co., Boston. 



Geo. H. Walsh, Bos- 
ton. 



Warren Brothers Co., 
Boston. 



C. P. Hicks Co., Mai- 
den. 



i Contract based upon this bid. 



2 Contract completed. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



133 



during the Year 1913 — Continued. 



Date of Con- 
tract. 



8. 

Date of 

Completion 

of Work. 



9. 



Prices of Principal Items of Contracts 
made in 1913. 



10. 

Value of Work 

done 
Dec. 31, 1913. 



June 25, 1913 



July 1, 1913 






Oct. 9, 1912 



Dec. 27, 1912 



Oct. 9, 1912 



Jan. 24, 1913 



Feb. 27, 1913 



Mar. 14, 1913 



Mar. 18, 1913 



Apr. 22, 1913 



Apr. 24, 1913 



May 8, 1913 



Apr. 1, 1913 



Feb. 20, 1913 



Feb. 12, 1913 



Mar. 12, 1913 



May 27, 1913 



May 28, 1913 



Apr. 5, 1913 



June 2, 1913 



May 31, 1913 



June 19, 1913 



5.30 per ton of 2,240 pounds delivered in bins at 
the Spot Pond station. 



4.02 per ton of 2,240 pounds delivered on cars at 
the Chestnut Hill stations; $4.17 per ton of 2,240 
pounds delivered on cars at the Hyde Park sta- 
tion, and $4.24 per ton of 2,240 pounds delivered 
at the Natick station on the Boston & Albany 
Railroad. 



For whole work, $416.25, 



Standard "A" power" sprayer, $1,187.15; power 
truck sprayer less commercial body, $4,387. 



For whole work, $220, 



For whole work, 



For whole work, $568, 



For whole work, 



For whole work, $300, 



$2,203 49 



8,889 14 



11 



12 



355 25 



457 00 



540 00 



416 25 



5,574 15 



220 00 



220 00 



645 30 



475 00 



300 00 



13 



14 



15 



16 



17 



18 



19 



20 



21 



22 



4 Longer time required for delivery. 



6 Competitive bids not received. 



134 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Contracts made and pending 





1. 

Num- 
ber 
of Con- 
tract. 


2. 

WORK. 


3. 

Num- 
ber 
of 
Bids. 


Amount of Bid. 


6. 




4. 

Next to 
Lowest. 


5. 

Lowest. 


Contractor. 


23 

24 

25 
26 

27 


Special 2 
Order. 

Special 2 
Order. 

Special 2 
Order. 

Special 2 
Order. 

Special 
Order. 


4,263 sq.ft. No. 24-inch "Self- 
sentering " sheets for rein- 
forcing concrete floor of 
engine room at Chestnut 
Hill pumping station. 

7,302 pieces 9-inch by 9-inch 
quarry tile for floors at 
Chestnut Hill pumping 
station. 

Laying tile floors at Chest- 
nut Hill pumping station. 

400 stone land bounds, 

Pelton water wheel for ma- 
chine shop at Chestnut 
Hill pumping station. 


3 

5 

5 

6 

_5 


$273 00 

781 14 

419 00 

$1 35 
each. 

_5 


$255 78i 

737 82i 

400 001 

$1 10i 
each. 

_5 


Penn Metal Co., Bos- 
ton. 

L. L. Rinaldi Co., 
Boston. 

Samuel H. Shaw Co., 
Boston. 

Henry Godbeer, Fitch- 
burg. 

Pelton Water Wheel 
Co., New York. 



i Contract based upon this bid. 



2 Contract completed. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



135 



during the Year 1913 — Continued. 



7. 



Date of Con- 
tract. 



Date of 

Completion 

of Work. 



9. 



Prices of Principal Items of Contracts 
made in 1913. 



10. 

Value of Work 

done 
Dec. 31, 1913. 



July 


21, 


1 
1913 


July 


24, 


1913 


Oct. 


8, 


1913 


Sept. 


8, 


1913 


Dec. 


4, 


1913 



For whole work, $255.78, 



Oct. 1, 1913 

Nov. 20, 1913 
Nov. 22, 1913 



For whole work, $737.82, 



For whole work, 

For each bound, $1.10, 

For whole work, $350, 



$255 78 23 



737 82 

415 93 

440 00 



$211,921 10 



5 Competitive bids were not received . 



136 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Contracts made and pending during the Year 1913 

Concluded. 

Summary of Contracts. * 



Water Works — 



Value of 

Work done Dec. 

31, 1913. 



Distribution Department, 5 contracts, . . . 

341 contracts completed from 1896 to 1912, inclusive, . . . . . . 

Deduct for work done on 11 Sudbury Reservoir contracts by the city of Boston, 
Total of 357 contracts, . 

1 In this summary contracts charged to maintenance are excluded. 



$154,242 27 
16,721,396 08 



$16,875,638 35 
512,000 00 



116,363,638 35 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



137 



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t^. 


00 


Os 


OO 


t» 


US 


CO 


us 


00 






CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


W 
































**S» 
































^ 
































• r»i 
































C3 




O 


CM 


— 


r^ 


eo 


CO 


o 


o 


CS 


OO 


OS 


t- 


00 


t~ 


fti 


'Axenwe£ 


t-» 


us 


o 


cm 


OS 


Cs 


Tf 


-*l 


00 


eo 


T* 


CM 


eo 


*"! 






CO 


CO 


CO 


eo 


CM 


CM 


CO 


CO 


CM 


eo 


eo 


co 


eo 


CO 


>J 
































^*o 
































^ 
































































































© 
































^ 
































"=5 




























-3 




i— i 




























o 

-3 


99 


6 


^ 


























CO ' 


-3 

CO 

u 

3 

3 


H 






















u 
'o 
> 

M 

o 

CO 

CU 

« 

w 

3 

a 






+s 


tc 




h] 
























a> 


.>> 


< 


P4 


a 

o 

o 

a 


o 
B 

0> 

S3 

CO 
1-5 


60 
CO 

to 


a 

3 

GO 

Ts 

O 

n 


r] 

3 
Q 

>> 

■— 

3 

13 


3 
a 

bfl 

.s 

a 
a 

Li 


s 

Q 

-a 

a 


> 

o 



<0 

a 

3 
■u 

13 

o 
o 



13 

3 
O 


"3 

O 

<D 
bfi 

CJ 

E 


CO 

3 

u 

c« 

« 

o 
> 

<5 


L 

3 

T3 

3 
02 

oT 
tc 

C3 
IS 

o 






















<o 


CO 


-w 






•paqsaa^M 




poqpjoiB^ 


M 


-3 


8 








1 




1 


Hasnqat;^ 




Ajnqpng 


>A 


u 


CQ 









138 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Table No. 2. — Rainfall in Inches at Jefferson, Mass., in 1913. 



Day of Month. 


>> 

Pi 
1-5 


>> 
u 

X 
o> 




a 


>> 




>-5 


43 

m 
3 
M 

< 


u 
0> 

S 

-^ 
ft 
01 

W. 


u 
o> 
£} 

O 


O 


U 
0> 
£> 

B 



> 





s 



01 

Q 


1, • 










- 


- 


0.20 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2, . 










- 


- 


O.O61 


- 


- 


- 


" 


0.04 


- 


1.00 


- 


- 


3, . 










0.53 


0.52i 


2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4, . 










- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.27 


2 


- 


0.05 


- 


5, 










- 


- 


0.25 


031 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1.67 


- 


- 


- 


6, 










- 


- 


0.311 


- 


0.09 


- 


0.29 


- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


7, 










2 


- 


- 


0.10 


- 


0.79 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


1.05* 


8, 










1.223 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.08 


- 


- 


2 


2 


2 


9, 










- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.19 


0.35 


- 


2 


1.00 


2 


10, 










- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


0.061 


11, 










0.20 


0.341 


0.383 


2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


12, 










0.22 


- 


- 


1.74 


- 


- 


0.15 


- 


- 


0.66 


- 


- 


13, 










- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


2 


- 


0.37 


0.15 


- 


- 


14, 










- 


- 


0.72 


0.72 


- 


- 


0.40 


- 


- 


0.11 


0.19 


- 


15, 










- 


- 


0.20 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


16, 










- 


- 


- 


0.49 


0.34 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.08 


0.083 




17, 










0.04 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 




18, 










0.07 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.15 


0.52 


0.30 


- 


- 


- 


19. 










- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.48 


- 


- 


2 


2 


2 


- 


20, 










2 


- 


0.55 


- 


- 


- 


0.07 


- 


2 


1.33 


0.34 




21, 










0.27 


- 


0.11 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2. 


- 


- 


- 


22, 










- 


0.74 


- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


3.59 


- 


- 


- 


23, 










0.34» 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


0.77 


- 


- 


- 


2 


24, 










- 


- 


0.26 


- 


2.43 


- 


0.23 


- 


- ' 


2 


- 


1.033 


25, 










- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


2 


26, 










- 


2 


2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


0.993 


27, 










0.09 


2 


2.88 


- 


2 


- 


- 


0.22 


- 


3.09 


- 


- 


28, 










- 


1.00 3 


- 


0.49 


2 


- 


1.14 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


29, 










O.lli 


- 


- 


0.11 


1.23 


- 


0.97 


0.54 


- 


- 


0.983 


- 


30, 










- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.55 


- 


- 


- 


- 


31, 










0.433 


- 


0.36 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


T 


otals 


, 


3.52 


2.60 


6.28 


3.96 


4.09 


1.27 


3.67 


3.26 


5.93 


6.42 


2.64 


3.13 



1 Snow. 



Total for the year 46.77 inches. 
2 Rainfall included in that of following day. 



3 Rain and snow. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



139 



Table No. 3. — Rainfall in Inches at Framingham, Mass., in 1913. 



Day of Month. 


eS 

a 

»-s 


>> 

<S 




ft 

< 


>> 

3 


01 

a 

3 


"3 

1-3 


00 
D 
bO 

< 


O 
Xi 

a 

a 
02 


Xi 

O 



O 


> 
O 




S 
Q 


1, 


- 


- 


0.18 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


2, 










- 


- 


0.011 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.77 


- 


0.57 


- 


- 


3, 










0.52 


0.571 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4, 










- 


- 


0.021 


0.02 


- 


- 


- 


0.49 


2 


0.02 


0.04 


- 


5, 










- 


- 


- 


0.29 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1.11 


- 


- 


- 


6. 










- 


- 


0.313 


0.033 


0.03 


- 


0.01 


0.03 


- 


0.01 


- 


- 


7, 










2 


- 


- 


0.03i 


- 


0.51 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


2 


8, 










1.133 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


2 


1.18 3 


9, 










- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


2 


0.80 


- 


10, 










2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.64 


0.01 


- 


2 


- 


- 


11, 










2 


0.151 


0.35 


2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


12, 










0.21 


- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


0.05 


- 


0.17 


0.75 


- 


- 


13, 










- 


- 


2 


2 


- 


- 


- 


1.07 


- 


- 


- 


- 


14, 










- 


- 


0.71 


2.33 


- 


- 


0.03 


- 


- 


0.39 


0.06 


- 


15, 










- 


- 


2 


2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


2 


- 


16, 










2 


2 


0.35 


0.65 


0.32 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.45 


0.233 


- 


17, 










0.09 


0.051 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


18, 










0.03 


- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


0.22 


0.33 


2 


0.02 


- 


- 


19, 










- 


- 


- 


0.05 


- 


2 


- 


- 


2 


2 


2 


- 


20, . 










- 


- 


0.65 


- 


- 


2 


0.05 


- 


2 


1.08 


0.17 


- 


21. . 










0.20 


2 


0.11 


- 


2 


1.37 


- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


22, . 










- 


2 


- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


2.61 


- 


- 


- 


23, . 










0.20 


0.933 


0.06 


0.07 


2 


- 


- 


0.42 


- 


- 


- 


2 


24, . 










- 


- 


- 


- 


2.68 


- 


1.36 


- 


- 


2 


- 


1.02 


25, . 










- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


0.14 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


2 


26, . 










- 


2 


2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2.00 


- 


0.953 


27, . 










0.01 


2 


2.66 


- 


2 


- 


- 


0.06 


- 


- 


- 


- 


28, . 










- 


1.023 


- 


2 


0.75 


- 


1.34 


- 


- 


0.02 


2 


- 


29, . 










O.lOi 


- 


- 


0.49 


0.01 


- 


0.10 


2 


- 


- 


2 


- 


30, . 










0.01 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.22 


1.38 


- 


- 


1.143 


- 


31, . 










0.46 


- 


0.22 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


T 


otals 




2.96 


2.72 


5.63 


3.96 


3.79 


2.02 


4.02 


4.56 


3.89 


5.31 


2.44 


3.15 



Total for the year 44.45 inches. 
1 Snow. 2 Rainfall included in that of following day. 



8 Rain and snow. 



140 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Table No. 4. — Rainfall in Inches at Chestnut Hill Reservoir in 1913. 



Date. 



Jan. 3, . 
Jan. 7, . 
Jan. 8, . 
Jan. 11, . 
Jan. 11, . 
Jan. 12, . 
Jan. 17, . 
Jan. 18, . 
Jan. 18, . 
Jan. 20, . 
Jan. 21, . 
Jan. 23, . 
Jan. 29, . 
Jan. 30, . 
Jan. 31, . 
Feb. 1, . 

Total, 



Amount. 



Duration. 



.65 

1.252 

.13 

.10 

.12 
.04 
.27 
.15 
.14 1 

.53 



3.38 



2.15 a.m. to 
9.00 a.m. to 

1.35 a.m. to 
8.30 p.m. to 

4.30 a.m. to 

5.15 p.m. to 
10.00 p.m. to 

12.50 p.m. to 
10.30 a.m. to 

7.45 p.m. to 



7.30 p.m. 

3.30 p.m. 
7.30 a.m. 

3.30 p.m. 

6.20 a.m. 
8.00 p.m. 

9.30 a.m. 
9.30 p.m. 

1.50 A.M. 

3.50 a.m. 



Feb. 3, . 


.601 


8.00 A.M. 


to 8.15 p.m. 


Feb. 11, . 


.242 


6.45 a.m. 


to 6.00 p.m. 


Feb. 16, . 


} -111 


10.45 p.m. 


to 


Feb. 17, . 




8.15 A.M. 


Feb. 21, . 


| .90 


10.50 p.m. 


to 


Feb. 22, . 




11.50 p.m. 


Feb. 26, . 


} .152 


9.00 p.m. 


to 


Feb. 27, . 




3.40 a.m. 


Feb. 27, . 


/ " 71 


6.05 a.m. 


to 


Feb. 28, . 




12.30 a.m. 


Total, . 


2.71 




Mar. 1, . 


.23 


12.30 p.m. 


to 6.00 p.m. 


Mar. 6, . 


.29 


11.55 A.M. 


to 3.15 p.m. 


Mar. 11, . 


.44 


12.20 a.m. 


to 9.00 a.m. 


Mar. 13, . 


] 1.05 


3.40 p.m. 


to 


Mar. 16, . 




7.45 a.m. 


Mar. 20, . 


.52 


8.00 A.M. 


to 8.30 p.m. 


Mar. 21, . 


.09 


4.30 p.m. 


to 10.00 p.m. 


Mar. 24, . 


.04 


12.05 a.m. 


to 3.35 a.m. 


Mar. 25, . 


] 2.52 


7.00 p.m. 


to 


Mar. 27, . 




6.15 p.m. 


Mar. 30, . 


} .24 


11.55 p.m. 


to 


Mar. 31, . 




8.00 p.m. 


Total, . 


5.42 




Apr. 3, . 


.04 


11.00 P.M. 


to 11.30 p.m. 


Apr. 5, . 


.41 


12.45 a.m. 


to 7.30 a.m. 


Apr. 7, . 


.162 


3.35 a.m. 


to 6.00 p.m. 


Apr. 11, . 


] 2.69 


5.30 a.m. 


to 


Apr. 14, . 




1.20 A.M. 


Apr. 15, . 


} .91 


8.00 p.m. 


to 


Apr. 16, . 




4.30 p.m. 


Apr. 18, . 


J .07 


9.15 p.m. 


to 


Apr. 19, 




4.50 a.m. 


Apr. 23, . 


.13 


3.30 a.m 


to 7.30 A.M. 


Apr. 28, . 


] .49 


9.30 a.m. 


to 


Apr. 29, . 




8.30 a.m. 


Total, . 


4.90 





Date. 



May 9, . 
May 15, . 
May 17, . 
May 22, . 
May 25, . 
May 28, . 
May 29, . 
May 29, . 

Total, 



June 2, 
June 7, 
June 19, 
June 21, 
June 25, 

Total, 



July 9, . 
July 10, . 
July 10, . 
July 14, . 
July 18, . 
July 24, . 
July 25, . 
July 28, . 
July 30, . 

Total, 



Aug. 2, . 
Aug. 2, . 
Aug. 4, . 
Aug. 10, . 
Aug. 13, . 
Aug. 18, . 
Aug. 23. . 
Aug. 27, . 
Aug. 29, . 
Aug. 30, . 

Total, 



Sept. 4, 
Sept. 5, 
Sept. 8, 
Sept. 13, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 19, 
Sept. 22, 
Sept. 22, 

Total, 



Amount. 



Duration. 



.04 
.40 

2.20 

.78 
.04 



3.46 



5.55 a.m. to 8.40 a.m. 
9.15 p.m. to 

11.45 A.M. 
1.10 A.M. tO 

6.15 A.M. 
11.20 A.M. tO 

4.50 a.m. 
12.10 a.m. to 5.15 p.m. 



.04 
.38 

.26 

.36 



1.04 



.63 

.06 
.10 
.40 

.30 

.66 
.10 



2.25 



2.25 a.m. to 3.10 a.m. 
3.00 p.m. to 7.10 p.m. 
5.30 p.m. to 

7.30 p.m. 
9.20 p.m. to 11.40 p.m. 



10.05 p.m. to 

6.10 a.m. 

8.15 a.m. to 2.00 p.m. 

12.25 a.m. to 12.55 a.m. 

7.45 a.m. to 6.00 p.m. 

2.20 p.m. to 

1.00 A.M. 
5.00 p.m. 
2.15 p.m. 



3.10 p.m. to 
1.45 p.m. to 



.59 
.08 
.25 
.06 
.80 
.95 
.37 
.44 

1.02 



4.56 



4.00 A.M. 
7.30 a.m. 
10.25 a.m. 
5.45 p.m. 
2.45 p.m. 
2.30 p.m. 
3.30 a.m. 
6.40 p.m. 



5.35 a.m. 
9.00 A.M. 
7.45 P.M. 
6.30 p.m. 
5.45 p.m. 
3.30 p.m. 
8.30 a.m. 
8.30 p.m. 



6.10 a.m. to 3.25 a.m. 



1.01 

.02 
.15 
.63 

.80 

.46 



3.07 



9.00 a.m. to 

2.10 p.m. to 

12.50 a.m. to 

1.45 a.m. to 

7.15 a.m. to 

8.00 A.M. to 



7.45 a.m. 
2.25 p.m. 
5.35 a.m. 
9.30 a.m. 

2.50 a.m. 
8.30 p.m. 



1 Snow. 



* Rain and snow. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



141 



Table No. 4. — Rainfall in Inches at Chestnut Hill Reservoir in 1913 

Concluded. 



Date. 


Amount. 


Duration. 


Date. 


Amount. 


Duration. 


Oct. 2, . 


.65 


2.20 a.m. to 2.45 p.m. 


Dec. 7, . 


} 1.20 


7.10 a.m. to 


Oct. 4, . 


.24 


10.00 a.m. to 3.00 P.M. 


Dec. 8, . 


5.15 A.M. 


Oct. 6, . 


} .90 


5.10 A.M. to 


Dec. 8, . 


.051 


10.30 a.m. to 3.30 p.m. 


Oct. 12, . 


1,45 p.m. 


Dec. 23, . 


} .98 


6.00 p.m. to 


Oct. 14, . 


J .80 


11.30 A.M. tO 


Dec. 24, . 


6.00 A.M. 


Oct. 15, . 


3.10 A.M. 


Dec. 25, . 


1 .872 


1.50 p.m. to 


Oct. 15, . 


1 .82 


2.30 p.m. to 


Dec. 26, . 


12.30 a.m. 


Oct. 16, . 


3.15 p.m. 


Dec. 26, . 


.19 


12.30 a.m. to 1.40 p.m. 


Oct. 19, . 


i 1.60 


2.35 p.m. to • 


Dec. 26, . 


.041 


1.40 p.m. to 7.30 p.m. 


Oct. 20, . 
Oct. 24, . 


9.30 p.m. 
9.45 a.m. to 








J 1.47 


Total, . 


3.33 




Oct. 26, . 


11.40 p.m. 








Total, . 


6.48 








Nov. 4, 


.05 


6.20 a.m. to 8.45 a.m. 




Nov. 9, 


.79 


6.00 a.m. to 10.30 p.m. 








Nov. 14, 


.10 


10.15 a.m. to 5.30 p.m. 








Nov. 16, 


.25 2 


3.45 a.m. to 10.45 p.m. 








Nov. 19, 


} .20 


11.35 p.m. to 








Nov. 20, 


3.25 a.m. 








Nov. 28, 


I 1.30 


7.15 p.m. to 








Nov. 29, 


9.30 p.m. 








Total, . 


2.69 





Total for year 43.29 inches. 



i Snow. 



2 Rain and snow. 



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METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



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No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



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154 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Table No. 13. — Sources from which and Periods during which Water has been 
drawn for the Supply of the Metropolitan Water District. 
From Wachusett Reservoir into the Wachusett Aqueduct. 



Month. 


Number of 

Days during 

which 

Water was 

flowing. 


Actual Time. 


Million 
Gallons 




Hours. 


Minutes. 


drawn. 


January, 


27 


27S 


50 


2,251.1 


February, 


28 


452 


46 


2,748.1 


March, 


26 


274 


30 


2,206.0 


April, . 


12 


122 


40 


940.2 


May 


30 


650 


5 


3,287.3 


June, , 


27 


316 


55 


3,073.9 


July 


21 


320 


35 


3,605.6 


August, . . . .. 


21 


249 


52 


3,072.1 


September, . 


21 


224 


45 


2,514.7 




25 


225 


30 


2,661.8 


November, . 


24 


233 


- 


2,136.3 


December, 


26 


269 


24 


2,526.8 


Totals 


288 


3,618 


52 


31,023.9 



Total actual time, 150.79 days. 

Total quantity drawn, 31,023,900,000 gallons. 



From Sudbury Reservoir through the Weston Aqueduct to Weston Reservoir. 



Month. 



Number of 

Days during 

which 

Water was 

flowing. 



Actual Time 
(Hours). 



Million 
Gallons 
drawn. 



January, 
February, 
March, . 
April, . 
May, 
June, 
July, . 
August, 
September, 
October, 
November, 
December, 
Totals, 



31 

28 
17 
21 
31 
30 
31 
31 
30 
31 
30 
31 



342 



740 
672 
408 
496 
744 
720 
744 
744 
720 
744 
720 
744 



8,196 



1,139.6 
1,043.3 
622.6 
758.3 
1,165.7 
1,206.0 
1,220.9 
1,212.8 
1,170.3 
1,200.2 
1,161.9 
1,217.6 



13,119.2 



Total actual time, 341.5 days. 

Total quantity drawn, 13,119,200,000 gallons. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



155 



Table No. 13 — Concluded. 

From Framingham Reservoir No. 3 through the Sudbury Aqueduct to Chestnut Hill Reservoir. 



Month. 



Number of 

Days during 

which 

Water was 
flowing. 



Actual Time 
(Hours). 



Million 
Gallons 
drawn. 



January, 
February, 
March, . 
April, . 
-May, 
June, 
July, 
August, 
September, 
October, 
November, 
December, 
Totals, 



31 
28 
31 
30 
31 
30 
31 
30 
30 
31 
30 
31 



364 



744 
672 
744 
720 
719 
720 
744 
715 
720 
744 
720 
744 



8,706 



2,153.9 
2,160.3 
2,397.3 
2,113.4 
1,945.5 
1,933.1 
2,256.6 
1,705.8 
1,485.1 
1,865.5 
1,779.0 
1,792.3 



23,587.8 



Total actual time, 362.75 days. 

Total quantity drawn, 23,587,800,000 gallons. 

From Lake Cochituate through the Cochituate Aqueduct to Chestnut Hill Reservoir. 



Month. 



Number of 

Days during 

which 

Water was 

flowing. 



Actual Time 
(Hours). 



Million 
Gallons 
drawn. 



January, 
February, 
March, . 
April, 
May, 
June, 
July, 
August, 
September, 
October, 
November, 
December, 
Totals, 



12 



270 



110.7 



21 

29 



497 
701 



329.2 
445.4 



62 



1,468 



885.3 



Total actual time, 61.17 days. 

Total quantity drawn, 885,300,000 gallons. 



156 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Table No. 14. 



Average Daily Quantity of Water flowing through Aqueducts in 
1913 by Months. 1 



Month. 


Wachusett 
Aqueduct 

into 
Sudbury 
Reservoir 
(Gallons). 


Weston 

Aqueduct 

into 

Metropolitan 

District 

(Gallons). 


Sudbury 
Aqueduct 
into 
Chestnut Hill 
Reservoir 
(Gallons). 


Cochituate 

Aqueduct 

into 

Chestnut Hill 

Reservoir 

(Gallons). 


January, 


72,455,000 


36,761,000 


69,481,000 


- 


February, . 










97,979,000 


37,261,000 


77,154,000 


- 


March, . 










70,994,000 


20,084,000 


77,332,000 


3,571,000 


April, . 










31,170,000 


25,277,000 


70,447,000 


- 


May, . 










105,878,000 


37,603,000 


62,758,000 


- 


June, . 










102,310,000 


40,200,000 


64,437,000 


- 


July, 










116,145,000 


39,384,000 


72,793,000 


- 


August, 










98,936,000 


39,123,000 


55,026,000 


10,619,000 


September, 










83,663,000 


39,010,000 


49,503,000 


14,847,000 


October, 










85,700,000 


38,716,000 


60,177,000 


- 


November, . 










71,033,000 


38,730,000 


59,300,000 


- 


December, . 










81,326,000 


39,278,000 


57,816,000 


- 


Average, 


84,830,000 


35,943,000 


64,624,000 


2,425,000 









1 Not including quantities wasted while cleaning and repairing aqueducts. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



157 



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158 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



cs 



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535 



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82,970,000 


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35 8 B & 8 ^ B til! 


Total, 
Average 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



159 



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160 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



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METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 





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No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



169 



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170 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



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No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



171 



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172 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



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> 

el 


tly ve 
ntly un 
intly v 


tly ve 
thy. 
tly ve 
trshy. 
tly veg 


© Pi 

> 03 

02 

e3 

>»^ 

43 a 












+3 

03 


s.a 

© s 


03 




O -iH 03 

.9 03^ 


a 
'5s 


a .a 


2 Pi 

S 03 


a Pi 
•3,3 












u 


pEl 


> 


> fa Q 


fa > 


fa 


fa 


fa 


fa 










o 


■pxepn'eig 


CM 


© 

CM 


© 
CNI 


tO IO »c 
CM CM CM 


© IO 
(M i-H 


© 

CXI 


CO 


© 


© 


© 

CXI 




o 


o 


ranmi'Bkj 


























43 


43 


1 © 1 © 1 © 


-P -P 


+3 

A 
bfi 


-*3 


43 


43 

A 

bfi 










•^U9UIip9g 


'bfi 


A 


02 

PI 


C3 CO 03 52 aSXI 
JS fl b PI fe bfi 


A A 
bfi bfi 


OS 


A 
bfi 


^=1 

bfi 


"03 








<J 








o 




















ft 

ft 




CQ 


0Q 


W 


O O w 


m cq 


l> 


C7J 


cXi 


> 
















•♦3 


+3 +3 


-p 


•+3 




43" 














,3 




. ^3 


^3 ^3 


r£3 


A 




rd 














bD 




-tJ += bfi 


bfi bJO 


bll 


■an 


+3 


bfi 










•A^ipiqinx 


bfi 


02 


n£3 

bJO 


^* x\ a 

bfi bfi 03 


"m oq 


73 


m 


^3 

bfl 


K 












0Q 


> 


02 


s s > 


> > 


> 


> 


GQ 


> 










•SO 


CO 


■* 


i— 1 © CO 
CO 


CXI Ttl 


CX| 


CO 


CO 


I-H 








•UOtpSUOQ JO 9+EQ 


03 
1-5 


3 

© 

fa 


03 


§ 3 £ 


>> bfi 


+3 

a 
© 

0Q 


43 

u 
O 


> 
O 


© 














© 


© 


tjh t>- r^ 


CO i-H 


co 


IO 


CO 


r^ 














H CM CO 


CXI CXI 


© 


co 


CM 


i-H 






•laquinj^; 


1— 1 


»o 


CO 
CO 


OS CO i-l 
CO I>- CO 


C5 t^ 

CO © 


© 


t^ 


cxi 


i-H 

co 


> 

<3 










o 


© 


© 


© © o 


© o 

















No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



177 



CO 

O 

caT 
?3 



<3 

CO 



Si. 



^ § 



co 

O 
••s> 
■to 






CO 

6 

m 
< 









CO 


r~ 


t^ 


CO 


l^ 


o 


CO 


CO 


1—1 


t^ o 


** 1 


US 






•ssaupxBjj 




























•paransuoo uaSAxQ 


CM 


CO 
CM 


•>* 

CM 


CO 


C5 
CM 


CM 

CO 


o 

CO 


CM 


CM 


CM OS 
CM i-l 


CO 
CM 


CO 
CM 




& 




o 


O 


o 


4_, 


O 


o 


,_, 


o 


o 


O O 


O 


o 




H 


•sa^u^ijvg; 


o 


o 


o 


O 


CO 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o o 


O 


o 




o 


CO 


o 


o 


o 


CO 


o 


o 


CO 


o o 


O 


o 




CD 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o o 


CO 


o 




O 03 


























































H 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o o 


o 


-<*< 






•saq.'BJ^ijsj; 


CO 


o 


CM 


CO 


»o 


CO 


CM 






CM CM 


CO 


CO 




& 


o 




T-H 


o 


y— i 




o 


o 


o 


o o 


o 


o 






o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o o 


CO 


o 




•9UIJ0^T{Q 


** 


T* 


t^ 


t-^ 


T-H 


CO 


CO 


e» 


-* 


CO us 


1—1 


us 




CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


"* 


-tf 


CO 


CM 


CO 


CO CO 


CM 


CO 










CM 


CO 


CO 


O} 


CM 


o 


CM 


■* 


o 


00 oo 


CO 


CO 








•papuedsng 


CM 

o 


o 


CM 

o 


CM 

o 


CO 

o 


CM 

o 


CO 

o 


CO 


o 


"* CM 

o o 


CO 

o 


CM 

o 






o 




o 


o 


o 


o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o o 


o 


o 






"* 


Tft 


o 


<M 


<* 


C5 


CM 


o 


CO 


CO o 


o 


o 




■"1 


5 


•paApssiQ 


CM 


CO 

o 


o 


CM 






IC 




CO 


■>* CO 




CM 




g 







o 


o 


o 


O 


o 


o 


O 


o 


o 


o o 


o 


o 




































§ 




c© 


CM 


CO 


■* 


CO 


CM 


Tt< 


-* 


00 


Tt) OO 


CO 


o 




g 


■< 


'l^ox 


Tt< 


o 


cxi 


TtH 


-* 


CO 


oo 


CM 


-** 


OS »o 


Tfl 






<1 














T— ( 






1— I 




1—1 










o 


o 


o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o o 


o 


o 






CO 


CM 


CO 


-* 


o 


CM 


CO 


>* 


CM 


-<ti CO 


CO 


-*l 






•aaj^ 






1—1 


CM 


CM 






o 




■-I o 


CO 








o 


o 


o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


CO o 


o 


o 








o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o o 


o 


o 




H O . 


•uoT^raSj 


US 

CO 


us 

CM 


US 

1— 1 


o 
o 


►o 


o 

CM 


o 


o 

CM 


o 

OS 


o o 

CM US 


us 

OS 


US 




p pj £ 

Q 5 O 


no ssofj 


o 




















o 


^ 




com E* 
































o 


o 


o 


m 


us 


o 


o 


o 


o 


US CO 


us 


CO 




tfgs 


*IBV>x 


OS 


CO 


-tfl 


CO 


CO 


O0 


7-1 


o 


»o 


i-H O 


US 


OS 




CM 


CO 


-# 


CO 


rti 


-tfl 


>o 


' CO 


CO 


1*1 •* 


CO 


CO 


























el 














© 


© 




o> 






o 




o> 


o3 














































X5 


X! 




£> 






,o 




X) 


CD 














03 
+3 
© 


o3 
© 


a 

3 


CJ 


3 


3 


03 

o> 


o> 

3 


03 
01 


X 
03 


3 












bfl 


CD 






03 


03 




o3 


bfl 




o3 










o 


01 

> 


© 
> 


o3 


(D 

> 


Cv> 
bfl 


CP 

bfl 


0) 

> 


Oi 
bfl 


0) 

> 




© 

bfl 










>> 


>» 


0) 

on 


>> 




Oi 

> 


>> 


03 

> 


>> 


C o3 2 
to«Cl 


© 

> 


















+i 


























o 


u 


>> 


o 


>> 


>> 


o 


>\ 


o 


>> ® >» 


>> 












a 


a 


+3 


a 


+s 


+3 


a 


+3 


ej 


^3 a^s 


+3 












+3 


+3 


fl 


+s 


a 


ti 


■+J 


a 


+3 


fldfl 


a 






























'3 3 '3 
ft ft 










K 
O 
Q 
O 




p 


Q 


03 
ft 


Q 


03 • 
ft 


03 
ft 


Q 


ft 


Q 


03 

ft 




























































03 






















O 


0> 










© 






























© 














© 


© 


fl 


o 


X! 


Xi 


o> 


o> 


CD 


3 JS 


X 


















o3 


03 








o3 












XI 


X 


3 


X 


•4-3 


+s 


X 


JD 


s> 


o3 X) 


+3 










T3 


o3 


01 




C3 


o> 


o> 


03 


o3 


o3 


m °3 


© 














+3 


fl 


-P> 


bl) 


bfl 










bfl 










O 


CD 


© 


o3 


a> 


0i 





o> 


01 


o> 




© 










o 


bfl 


on 


bl) 


> 


> 


b() 


bl) 


bfl 


© el bfl 


> 










© 


0) 




O 






o> 


0> 


CD 


> o3 © 














> 


> 


bfl 


> 


>> 


>. 


> 


> 


> 


03 ^ 


>> 












>> 


>i 


>» 


>> 


a 


el 


>> 


>. 


>. 


>>v >, 


a 










































+3 














-P Cl+3 














.fl 






PI 


o3 


o3 


"3 


'3 


'3 


.9 a .B 

'3 ^'3 


o3 












1*1 


ft 


ft 


ft 


> 


> 


ft 


ft 


ft 


ft ft 


> 










o 


•pj'BpU'B^g 


o 


o 


*H 


CO 


t>. 


o 


t^. 


_ 


^H 


i-l OS 


o 


CO 




H 


o 

o 


tUTlUl^'BU 






























+3 


-*j 


-P 










-p 




•p 


+3 












A 


A 


_fl 


rfj 


A 


X) 




^3 


J3 


. -a 


A 










bfl 


bfl 


oil 


bfl 


bfl 


bfl 




bfl 


bl) 


+3 bfl 


bfl 








K 


•^nauiipag 


"o3 


In 


"to 


CO 


"co 


co 


^3 
bfl 


"en 


co 


bfl co 


CO 








On 

Cm 

<3 




> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


53 


> 


> 


m > 


> 










jj 








-p 


+s 


+3 


■+-3 


H-3 


•+3 +3 


-u 












^ 






A 


rd 


J 


r0 


r=l 


r=) 


A A 


^3 












M 




bfl 


bO 


bfl 


bfl 


bfl 


bfl 


bl) 


bfl bfl 


bfl 










•^ipiqanx 


"lo 


ti 


CO 


co 


CO 


CO 


co 


CO 


CO 


co co 


CO 












> 


& 


> 


> 


> 


K* 


> 


> 


> 


> > 


s> 










CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


lO 


CM 


o 

CO 


T»< 


CM 


O CO 


1-1 








•UOI^09|PQ JO 3^Q 


d 
i-s 


xi 
ft 


c5 
S 




>> 


0) 


o> 

a 

•-9 


bi 


ft 
0> 


© o 


6 
© 










CM 


CM 


CM 


CO 


CM 


OS 


CO 


CO 


o 


o — < 


CO 












O 


C5 


CO 


-t< 


iO 


CO 


00 


CM »H 


OS 






•jaqum^ 


u> 


1 - 


W 

CO 


00 

CO 


«5 


00 


00 

oo 


o 


o 


C^ -ft 

— I OI 


o 
co 


4(4 










o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 















178 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Ob 






SI 

© 

<4i 



5* 

(3 

Oh 

© 









CO 
OS 



"^ 



CO 
CO 

6 

M 
< 



•ssaupi^jj 



•p9ransuoQ uaS^xQ 



H 

O CO 
H 



55 & 

o2 
S o 



o 
O 



000'HONMW^I<*lOiflQOMMOCi)MMtOSOJiO'il'*IOl010 



•sa^u^ij^ 



•sa^Bj^i^j 



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oooooooooooooooooooooooooooo 



00'HCO(NQCOOO)00-HCi5lOIMOONOOCOlOCOtDi-I^O)OfflO»'*05 
Mr- 1 *- l-HrHrtOOCO"*'*Tj<CC'- 1 N (N r- IHNP5M0010MOOCON 

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10IMU3MN1M 
CO C^t CS1 i— I C\) OS 

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Nr- IO5COCO-!t<lOOi00<NlTfl'— I KC5 OS CO Nt)( iH ©O) 
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I OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO 



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1— I 1—1 1—1 

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fl fl fl fl fj . , 

S B S S S22222222222222222222222 
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. .-gsi^l .-.as . _ . . .as . . .| . . . . 

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rt -^-e-e g^* 3 8 S o o-g^-is . <» d o o . ft . . . . 

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.5s coo^Th otjtj 32 aft p.3 32 S S-«p4^ So aaa 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



179 



Table No. 34. 



Chemical Examinations of Water from a Faucet in Boston, 
from 1892 to 1913. 

[Parts per 100,000.] 





Color. 


Residue on 
Evaporation. 


Ammonia. 


6 

G 
o 

o 

.41 


Nitrogen 

AS 


13 

s 

TO 

d 

o 

d 

o 






T3 

u 
OS 

d 
1* 

ra 


u 

B d 

*i 03 

-p 

o3 

S 


o 


d 
.2 

+3 

'3 
d m 

TO 
TO 

o 


6 

OJ 
u 


ALBUMINOID. 


TO 

a; 

+3 

f-, 
-P 


TO 

o 

+3 
-P 




Year. 


+3 
O 

H 


T3 
> 

TO 

TO 

Q 


T3 

d 
a; 

TO 

d 


TO 
TO 

O 

O 

M 


1892, . 


,37 


.37 


4.70 


1.67 


.0007 


.0168 


.0138 


.0030 


.0210 


.0001 


- 


1.9 


1893, . 


.61 


.53 


4.54 


1.84 


.0010 


.0174 


.0147 


.0027 


.38 


.0143 


.0001 


.60 


1.8 


1894, . ' . 


.69 


.58 


4.64 


1.83 


.0006 


.0169 


.0150 


.0019 


.41 


.0106 


.0001 


.63 


1.7 


1895, . 


.72 


.59 


4.90 


2.02 


.0006 


.0197 


.0175 


.0022 


.40 


.0171 


.0001 


.69 


0.7 


1896, . 


.49 


.45 


4.29 


1.67 


.0005 


.0165 


.0142 


.0023 


.37 


.0155 


.0001 


.56 


1.4 


1897, . 


.65 


.55 


4.82 


1.84 


.0009 


.0193 


.0177 


.0016 


.40 


.0137 


.0001 


.64 


1.6 


1898, . 


.41 


.40 


4.19 


1.60 


.0008 


.0152 


.0136 


.0016 


.29 


.0097 


.0001 


.44 


1.4 


1899, . 


.23 


.28 


3.70 


1.30 


.0006 


.0136 


.0122 


.0014 


.24 


.0137 


.0001 


.35 


1.1 


1900, . 


.24 


.29 


3.80 


1.20 


.0012 


.0157 


.0139 


.0018 


.25 


.0076 


.0001 


.38 


1.3 


1901, . 


.24 


.29 


4.43 


1.64 


.0013 


.0158 


.0142 


.0016 


.30 


.0173 


.0001 


.42 


1.7 


1902, . 


.26 


.30 


3.93 


1.56 


.0016 


.0139 


.0119 


.0020 


.29 


.0092 


.0000 


.40 


1.3 


1903, . 


.25 


.29 


3.98 


1.50 


.0013 


.0125 


.0110 


.0015 


.30 


.0142 


.0001 


.39 


1.5 


1904, . 


- 


.23 


3.93 


1.59 


.0023 


.0139 


.0121 


.0018 


.34 


.0110 


.0001 


.37 


1.5 


1905, . 


- 


.24 


3.86 


1.59 


.0020 


.0145 


.0124 


.0021 


.35 


.0083 


.0001 


.35 


1.4 


1906, . 


- 


.24 


3.86 


1.39 


.0018 


.0159 


.0134 


.0025 


.34 


.0054 


.0001 


.36 


1.3 


1907, . 


- 


.22 


3 "83 


1.40 


.0013 


.0129 


.0109 


.0020 


.33 


.0068 


.0001 


.32 


1.3 


1908, . 


- 


.19 


3.50 


1.35 


.0011 


.0115 


.0092 


.0024 


.33 


.0092 


.0001 


.26 


1.2 


1909, . 


- 


.18 


3.46 


1.43 


.0011 


.0128 


.0103 


.0025 


.28 


.0034 


.0000 


.25 


1.3 


1910, . 


- 


.14 


3.05 


1.24 


.0013 


.0118 


.0102 


.0016 


.28 


.0030 


.0000 


.22 


1.1 


1911, . 


- 


.25 


4.18 


1.66 


.0015 


.0156 


.0128 


.0029 


.38 


.0029 


.0000 


.33 


1.4 


1912, . 


- 


.17 


3.86 


1.23 


.0018 


.0154 


.0119 


.0034 


.36 


.0062 


.0000 


.29 


1.7 


1913, . 


- 


.13 


3.96 


1.15 


.0014 


.0150 


.0120 


.0026 


.35 


.0064 


.0000 


.26 


1.5 



180 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



«5 



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pq 
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o 


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CO 


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CO 


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as 


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CO 


CO 


H* 


& B 


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1 


































5 PS 




































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Eh O 


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1 — 1 


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t>. 


r^ 


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CO 


CM 


lO 


■* 


hJ PS 


c3 


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TP 


lO 


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(>. 


OS 


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CM 


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CO 


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CD 


co 


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3 


































CO CO 


































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Ph 






































w o 




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o > 




Tt< 


1-H 


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o 


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t^ 


US 


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o 


CM 




CO 


t^ 


■* 


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iz; ps 
S B 

g 05 


d 


CM 


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CM 






T— < 


CM 


CM 


l>- 


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■* 


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CM 


CM 


<! B 
PSrd 




% 


































§ • 






































3fl 






































w o 




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o 


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t^ 


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2 > 

& PS 






en 


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us 


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6 




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T»H 


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us 


3 B 


























CM 




1-1 






<! B 




m 


































PSrd 








































a 


to 


•* 




CM 


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lO 


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CO 


o 




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CO 


CO 


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B 

EH 


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T— 1 




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cq 




































a 


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o 




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t>- 


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CO 




us 


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t- 1 


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co 


us 


t^ 


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CM 










13 & 


PQ 


































pq K 
q B 

L3 CO 




































6 

C3 


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CO 


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03 




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Eh S 


o 
















OS 


t^ 




co 


CO 


CM 


CO 


CO 


t-- 


+3 
















lO 


CM 


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1* 


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CO 


CO 


CO 


CM 


B O 


o 


































CO •> 

^ B 


PQ 


































6 






1 




1 


I 




OS 


CO 


US 


T— 1 




o 


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us 


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03 
















CO 


■># 


CM 


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00 


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CO 


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rh 


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us 


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PS 




































•«i 




































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o 








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o 


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OO 


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No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



181 



0> 



a 
o 

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fe 3 



s: 


u 


co 


u— 


*c» 




K 


O 


e 


# 


Or 


tH 


V. 


o 


o 


> 
e3 


o 


• « 




4S 




s 


co 




© 


3 






o 


« 






S3 


!3 




3 




CJ 


1 


u, 




O 


to 


U 


CO 


03 
43 



£ -2 



n 

Eh 



e3 

























































































®^=! P 


1 


1 


1 


I 


1 


1 


OS 


CO 


CN| 


CM 


I— 1 


h- 




rH 


CM 


CD 




















CO 


CO 


CNI 


CM 


CO 


t- 


r~ 


CO 


CO 


ui 








rfl bfi'^ 














T_l 


CO 


"* 


"* 


T* 


CO 


CO 


-# 


■* 


CO 








Oi-H-O 


































f 






J? M 








































a 


































- 






2 te » 

3o> 


1 




1 


1 


1 


1 


•* 


CO 


CO 


ui 


CO 


CO 


1-H 


•<3S 


CM 


t-- 


c 


















t*. 


CO 


CM 


o 


-*l 




CM 


-CH 




co 




















C%I 


CO 


CO 


CM 


-CH 


CO 


CM 


CO 


** 


CM 
































1—1 
















£ M 
















































































































<* 








































H 




a 


































r 








1 


1— 1 


CM 


o 




oo 


o 




CO 


f^ 


Ui 


OS 




Ui 


t^. 


© 










o 


>o 


00 


«o 


OS 


l^ 


t^- 


CO 


(M 


OS 


Ui 


CM 




CO 












cq 


■<*! 


CN| 


T*H 


CO 


TH 


co 


Ui 


■* 


CO 


OS 


■<** 


t^~ 


OS 


•tl 










































' 






a 








































© te o 


o 


cm 


00 


CO 


t^. 


CO 


CO 


00 


o 


CM 


CO 


CO 


t^ 


00 


Ui 


i-H 








CO 


OS 


CO 


■* 


CO 


00 


o 


CN| 


Ui 




CO 




■* 


t>- 


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c« 








CM 


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Ui 








S^« 
























»H 






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1 








































- 






a 










































E-i 05 

iZ! 1= 
H O 










































cm 


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c» 


t^ 


CO 


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•-O 


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■*f 


r- < 


OS 


OS 


OS 


Ui 


TH 


OS 


© 


1 






o 


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OS 




<M 


CO 


t^ 


"5 


CM 




CO 


OS 


CO 


Ui 




. ui 




K 






6 


CO 


CO 


OO 


T* 


iQ 


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US 


l>. 


■* 


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CO 


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OS 


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00 


< 






fa H 






































O 




H < 






































t> 




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K 
















































































05 










































w 




t> 2 




«* 


CM 


OS 


^ 


t^. 


o 


00 


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1 


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■* 


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►J 

M 

w 




FH Q 


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1— t 


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oo 


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1—1 


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CM 


c 
c 
c 


















































































Eh 














































■ 3 




tjl 


OS 


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1 _ ( 


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CO 


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CO 


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© 


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CO 


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oo 


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Ui 


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Ui 


CO 




o 




13 


CO 


CO 


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us 


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t~ 


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1-H 


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■ 




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oo 


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Ui 


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© 


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CM 


00 


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r^ 






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t^ 


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CO 


o 


t^ 


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•* 


r^ 


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© 






Ph 




"CH 


1— 1 


>o 


CO 


us 


CO 


-* 


CO 


CO 


Ui 


t^ 


© 


CO 


!>. 


t>. 


CO 






H 


3 




'-' 




















»-l 














O 
Ph 


CC 






































CO 




































n 




PS 




































H 






ffl 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


I 


1 


, 


CO 


CO 


OS 


OS 


Ui 


■>*< 


1^ 


Ui 
























CO 


•"*• 


t~- 


OS 


CM 


CO 




CO 






»— i 


















r>- 


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CO 


CO 


OS 


"■"i 


Ui 








3 
























CM 














« 




































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u 

- 




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w 






































^ 








































eo 


OS 


o 




Tl 


CO 


~r 


LO 


CO 


t^ 


CO 


OS 


o 




c-i 


CO 


1 






os 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


8 


o 


o 


o 




















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cs 


en 


<r> 


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crs 


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os 


OS 


OS 


OS 


OS 





rd ° 



182 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Table No. 36. — ■ Number of Bacteria per Cubic Centimeter in Water from Vari- 
ous Parts of the Metropolitan Water Works, from 1898 to 1913, inclusive. 

[Averages of weekly determinations.] 







Chestnut Hill Reservoir. 


Southern Service Taps. 


Year. 


Sudbury 
Aqueduct 
Terminal 
Chamber. 


Cochituate 
Aqueduct. 


Effluent 
Gate-house 

No. 2. 


Low Service, 

185 Boylston 

Street. 


High Service, 

1 Ashburton 

Place. 


1898, 


207 


145 


Ill 


96 


_ 


1899, 










*224 


104 


217 


117 


123 


1900, 










248 


113 


256 


188 


181 


1901, 










225 


149 


169 


162 


168 


1902, 










203 


168 


121 


164 


246 


1903, 










76 


120 


96 


126 


243 


1904, 










347 


172 


220 


176 


355 


1905, 










495 


396 


489 


231 


442 


1906, 










231 


145 


246 


154 


261 


1907, 










147 


246 


118 


130 


176 


1908, 










162 


138 


137 


136 


148 


1909, 










198 


229 


119 


150 


195 


1910, 










216 


- 


180 


178 


213 


1911, 










205 


204 


151 


175 


197 


1912, 










429 


450 


227 


249 


259 


1913, 










123 


243 


157 


119 


140 


At 


r erag 


es, 






234 


201 


188 


159 


223 



Table No. 37. — Colors of Water from Various Parts of the Metropolitan Water 
Works in 1913. {Averages of Weekly Determinations.) 

[Platinum Standard.] 




1 The colors given in this column represent the combined colors of the waters of the four principal 
feeders. The color of each is determined monthly, and due weight is given in combining the results to 
the sizes of the streams. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



183 



Table No. 37. — Colors of Water, etc. — Concluded. 

[Platinum Standard.] 





Chestnut Hill 


Spot 


Fells 
Reser- 
voir. 


Northern 


Southern 




Reservoir. 


Pond. 


Service. 


Service. 




^ 


^ 








T3T3 




a a 


a a 


Month. 


+3 
3 




6 
•2? 




to 

O 


lenwoo 
Medfor 
-ice). 


Statioi 
Stree 
(Hig 


ap at 185 Boylsto 
Street, B o s t o 
(Low Service). 


hburto 
o s t o 
vice). 




J2 O* 
+3 

"3 

l-H 


o 

13 
i— i 




3 


03 

o 

a 


ap at G 
Yard, 
(Low Serv 


ap at Fire 
Hancock 
Everett 
Service). 


ap at 1 As 
Place, B 
(High Ser 




W 


i 


H 


H 


H 


H 


H 


January, .... 


.14 


_ 


.13 


.09 


.09 


.15 


.10 


.14 


.14 


February, 










.16 


- 


.16 


.12 


.12 


.16 


.12 


.16 




16 


March, 










.17 


.22 


.17 


.13 


.13 


.17 


.13 


.16 




17 


April, 










.18 


- 


.18 


.13 


.13 


.17 


.13 


.17 




18 


May, . 










.19 


- 


.18 


.13 


.13 


.17 


.13 


.18 




18 


June, . 










.19 


- 


.18 


.12 


.12 


.17 


.13 


.18 




18 


July, . 










.16 


- 


.17 


.12 


.12 


.16 


.12 


.16 




17 


August, 










.14 


.17 


.14 


.13 


.12 


.14 


.12 


.14 




14 


September, 








.14 


.18 


.15 


.12 


.12 


.14 


.12 


.14 




15 


October, 








.13 


- 


.13 


.12 


.11 


.13 


.11 


.13 




13 


November, 








.15 


- 


.15 


.12 


.12 


.15 


.12 


.14 




15 


December, 








.14 


- 


.13 


.07 


.07 


.13 


.08 


.13 




13 


Average 


s, 








.16 


.19 


.16 


.12 


.12 


.15 


.12 


.15 


.16 



Table No. 38. — ■ Temperatures of Water from Various Parts of the Metropolitan 
Water Works in 1913. {Averages of Weekly Determinations.) 

[The temperatures are taken at the same places and times as the samples for microscopical examination; 
the depth given for each reservoir is the depth from high- water mark.] 



[Degrees Fahrenheit 




184 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Table No. 38. 



Temperatures of Water, etc. 

[Degrees Fahrenheit.] 



Concluded. 





Lake 
cochituate 


Chest- 


Spot Pond 












(Depth 
at Place of 
Observation 


nut 

Hill 

Reser- 


(Depth 
at Place of 
Observation 


Northern 
Service. 


Southern 
Service. 




62.0 Feet). 


voir. 


28.0 Feet). 










Month. 


6 

03 


ft 

03 

T3 


a 

c 


6 

og 

fl 

o> 

m 


6 

03 


-a 

ft 


a* 

o 


at Glenwood 
a r d, Medford 
ow Service). 


ap at Fire Station, 
Hancock Street, 
Everett (High 
Service). 


at 185 Boylston 
reet, Boston 
ow Service). 


at 1 Ashburton 
ace, Boston 
igh Service). 




3 


rH 


o 


3 


T3 


o 


^ 




%&& 




CQ 


i 


PQ 


w 


W 


% 


PQ 


H 


H 


H 


H 


January, . 


35.3 


37.0 


37.0 


36.7 


36.1 


36.0 


36.0 


41.3 


39.0 


40.4 


45.0 


February, 


34.8 


35.7 


35.7 


36.2 


34.5 


34.8 


35.1 


40.0 


38.4 


40.5 


41.4 


March, 


40.0 


40.0 


40.5 


40.6 


39.0 


39.3 


39.6 


41.0 


41.8 


43.5 


44.7 


April, 


47.0 


44.8 


45.6 


48.8 


47.2 


46.6 


46.9 


47.2 


48.0 


50.1 


52.7 


May, 


58.5 


49.5 


47.5 


56.6 


55.3 


55.3 


56.3 


56.0 


55.8 


57.3 


59.8 


June, 


68.8 


54.3 


49.8 


66.4 


65.5 


65.3 


65.0 


61.8 


64.5 


65.0 


66.4 


July, 


75.4 


55.1 


49.5 


72.3 


72.6 


72.6 


71.6 


71.1 


72.2 


71.6 


72.7 


August, 


74.0 


56.0 


52.0 


74.4 


73.6 


73.5 


73.4 


73.0 


75.0 


73.2 


74.3 


September, 


64.0 


56.0 


49.5 


67.6 


67.1 


67.1 


67.9 


69.2 


68.8 


68.5 


69.2 


October, . 


57.7 


57.5 


49.7 


59.5 


59.4 


59.5 


59.8 


61.8 


60.5 


60.7 


62.0 


November, 


48.8 


49.0 


47.5 


49.4 


49.5 


48.9 


49.0 


55.0 


51.8 


52.7 


53.6 


December, 


39.8 


41.0 


41.3 


38.9 


38.9 


39.7 


40.2 


45.8 


42.8 


45.2 


44.3 


Averages, . 


53.7 


48.0 


45.5 


54.0 


53.2 


53.2 


53.4 


55.3 


54.9 


55.7 


57.2 



Table No. 39. 



Temperatures of the Air at Three Stations on the Metropolitan 
Water Works in 191 3. 

[Degrees Fahrenheit.] 





Chestnut Hill 
Reservoir. 


Framingham. 


Clinton. 


Month. 






















a 


a 




a 


a 




a 


a 









s 




3 


3 




3 


3 






a 


a 


c 


a 


a 


a 


a 


a 


fl 




X 


a 


03 


X 


d 


03 


x 


a 


=? 




c3 




O 


03 




0> 


03 




o 




B 


§ 


§ 


§ 


§ 


3 


§ 


§ 


3 


January, . 


62 


11 


38.0 


59 


10 


37.2 


63 


8 


34.5 


February, 








59 





26.6 


57 


—2 


26.7 


55 


—7 


23.8 


March , 








72 


6 


42.9 


70 


5 


42.5 


69 


5 


38.4 


April, 








79 


25 


48.4 


82 


23 


48.6 


83 


24 


47.1 


May, 








83 


36 


55.7 


84 


35 


56.5 


86 


34 


55.1 


June, 








91 


45 


66.8 


90 


39 


66.3 


86 


41 


64.9 


July, 








98 


49 


73.4 


96 


48 


72.7 


89 


53 


71.1 


August, 








95 


44 


69.6 


96 


42 


69.2 


90 


46 


67.8 


September, 








87 


35 


61.5 


86 


31 


60.8 


84 


34 


59.3 


October, . 








73 


30 


55.9 


72 


29 


55.8 


, 71 


25 


53.9 


November, 








70 


24 


44.8 


69 


22 


43.5 


69 


21 


43.4 


December, 








59 


15 


35.8 


57 


12 


34.5 


55 


9 


32.8 


Averages, 








- 


- 


51.6 


- 


- 


51.2 


- 


- 


49.3 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWEEAGE BOARD. 



185 



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186 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 






© 

5- 



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05 

a 


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03 
to 

a 


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03 

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a 

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ft 

03 

^3 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



187 






"t3 
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£-H 



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05 

05 



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a 

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188 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Table No. ,43. — Number of Service Pipes, Meters and Fire Hydrants in the 
Several Cities and Towns supplied by the Metropolitan Water Works, Dec. 
31, 1913, and the Number of Services and Meters installed during the Year 
1913. 



City ok Town. 



Services. 



Meters. 



Fire 
Hydrants. 



Services 
Installed. 



Meters 
Installed. 



Boston, 
Somerville, 
Maiden, . 
Chelsea, . 
Everett, . 
Quincy, . 
Medford, , 
Melrose, . 
Revere, 1 . 
Water town, 
Arlington, 
Milton, 
Winthrop, 
Stoneham, 
Belmont, . 
Lexington, 
Nahant, . 
Swampscott, 
Totals, 



100,626 
12,827 
7,538 
4,768 
5,686 
8,564 
5,091 
3,784 
4,022 
2,417 
2,409 
1,678 
2,740 
1,544 
1,242 
1,063 
620 
1,702 



41,654 
7,856 
7,512 
4,693 
2,230 
7,381 
5,073 
4,041 
1,995 
2,425 
2,438 
1,678 
2,667 
1,337 
1,242 
843 
371 
1,702 



8,851 
1,175 
537 
316 
563 
997 
618 
348 
250 
353 
432 
388 
254 
149 
222 
175 
94 
165 



1,489 

255 

114 

86 

109 

396 

301 

95 

248 

166 

132 

91 

85 

46 

115 

103 

33 

75 



168,351 



97,168 



15,887 



3,939 



7,488 
763 
114 
119 
369 
1,256 
310 

95 
393 
192 
481 

91 

81 
232 
115 

92 
•37 

75 



12,303 



1 Includes small portion of Saugus. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



189 



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TREET. 




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OMERVILLE 
CITY HALL 
NEX, WALNUT 
STREET. 


































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CITY HALL 

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METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



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No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



191 



Appe nd ix No. 3 . 



Water Works Statistics for the Year 1913. 

The Metropolitan Water Works supply the Metropolitan Water 
District which includes the following cities and towns : — 



Crrr or Town. 



Population, 
Census of 1910. 



Estimated 
Population, 
July 1, 1913. 



Boston, 

Somerville, . . . . . . . 

Maiden, . . 

Chelsea, > 

Newton, 1 • . 

Everett, 

Quincy, 

Medford, 

Hyde Park, . 

Melrose, 

Revere, 

Watertown, 

Arlington, . . . . . . . 

Milton 

Winthrop, 

Stoneham, 

Swampscott, 

Lexington, 

Belmont, 

Nahant, 

Total population of Metropolitan Water District, 
Saugus, 3 



670,585 

77,236 

44,404 

32,452 

39,806 

33,484 

32,642 

23,150 

15,507 

15,715 

18,219 

12,875 

11,187 

7,924 

10,132 

7,090 

6,204 

4,918 

5,542 

1,184 



1,070,256 
280 



733,360 
82,810 
47,890 
35,820 
42,680 
37,300 
35,530 
25,650 

-2 

16,640 

20,720 

14,060 

12,550 

8,470 

11,440 

7,830 

6,640 

5,400 

6,320 

1,380 



1,152,490 
280 



1 No water supplied during the year from Metropolitan Water Works. 

2 Included in Boston. 

3 Only a small portion of Saugus is supplied with water. 



Mode of Supply. 
33 per cent, by gravity. 
67 per cent, by pumping. 



192 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



'Pumping. 
Chestnut Hill Pumping Station No. 1: — 

Builders of pumping machinery, Holly Manufacturing Company, Quintard 

Iron Works and E. P. Allis Company. 
Description of coal used: — Bituminous: Beaver Run, Sterling and Sonman. 

Anthracite : buckwheat. Price per gross ton in bins : bituminous $4 to $4.28, 

buckwheat $3.04 to $3.09. Average price per gross ton $3.92. Per cent. 

ashes 10.8. 

Chestnut Hill Pumping Station No. 2: — 

Builders of pumping machinery, Holly Manufacturing Company. 

Description of coal used : — Bituminous : Beaver Run, Sterling and Sonman. 
Anthracite: buckwheat. Price per gross ton in bins: bituminous $3.87 to 
$3.95, buckwheat $2.89 to $2.91. Average price per gross ton $3.75. Per 
cent, ashes 11.7. 

Spot Pond Station: — 

Builders of pumping machinery, Geo. F. Blake Manufacturing Company and 
Holly Manufacturing Company. 

Description of coal used: — •Bituminous: Georges Creek. Anthracite: screen- 
ings. Price per gross ton in bins: bituminous $4.78 to $5.15, screenings $2.50. 
Average price per gross ton $4.09. Per cent, ashes 12.2. 





Chestnut Hill 


Pumping Stations. 






No. 1. 




No. 2. 




Engines 

Nos. 
1 and 2. 


Engine 
No. 3. 


Engine 
No. 4. 


Engine 
No. 12. 


Daily pumping capacity (gallons), .... 


16,000,000 


20,000,000 


30,000,000 


40,000,000 


Coal consumed for year (pounds), .... 


1,212,759 


29,525 


2,783,226 


4,921,045 


Cost of pumping, figured on pumping station ex- 


$4,669.64 


$153.92 


$17,135.93 


$17,635.22 


Total pumpage for year, corrected for slip (million 
gallons). 


459.35 


23.56 


3,991.82 


7,314.38 


133.99 


120.15 


119.19 


122.32 


Gallons pumped per pound of coal, .... 


378.76 


797.97 


1,434.24 


1,486.35 


Duty on basis of plunger displacement, . 


43,580,000 


83,530,000 


145,260,000 


154,520,000 


Cost per million gallons raised to reservoir, 


$10.1658 


$6.5331 


$4.2328 


$2.4110 


Cost per million gallons raised one foot, . 


.0759 


.0544 


.0360 


.0197 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



193 



Daily pumping capacity (gallons), 

Coal consumed for year (pounds), 

Cost of pumping, figured on pumping station expenses, 

Total pumpage for year, corrected for slip (million gallons), 

Average dynamic head (feet), 

Gallons pumped per pound of coal, 

Duty on basis of plunger displacement, 

Cost per million gallons raised to reservoir, 

Cost per million gallons raised one foot, 



Chestnut Hill 

Pumping 
Station No. 2. 



Engines Nos. 5, 
6 and 7. 



105,000,000 

5,081,095 

$28,589.64 

13,742.46 

39.07 

2,704.63 

89,830,000 

$2.0804 

.0532 



Spot Pond 
Station. 



Engines N03. 
• and 9. 



30,000,000 

2,230,505 

$13,968.51 

2,600.88 

127.41 

1,186.05 

126,270,000 

$5.3707 

.0422 



Consumption. 

Estimated total population of the nineteen cities and towns 

supplied wholly or partially during the year 1913, . . 1,109,810 

Total consumption (gallons), pump basis, 38,170,730,000 

Average daily consumption (gallons), pump basis, . . . 104,577,000 

Gallons per day to each inhabitant, pump basis, ... 94 



Distribution. 



Owned and 
operated by 
Metropolitan 

Water 
and Sewerage 

Board. 



Total in District 

supplied 

by Metropolitan 

Water Works. 



Kinds of pipe used, 

Sizes, 

Extensions, less length abandoned (miles), 
Length in use (miles), .... 

Stop-gates added, 

Stop-gates now in use, .... 
Service pipes added, .... 

Service pipes now in use, 

Meters added, 

Meters now in use 

Fire hydrants added, .... 
Fire hydrants now in use, 



_i 
60-4 inch. 
14.372 
116.10 
36 2 
492 



60-4 inch. 

33.11 

1,779.01 



3,662 

168,300 

11,696 

97,056 

509 

15,887 



1 Cast-iron, cement-lined wrought-iron, cement-lined steel and kalamine pipe. 

2 Includes pipes and stop-gates acquired from Boston Water Works under chapter 694 of the Acts of 1012. 



194 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Appendix No . 4 



Contracts made and pending during 
Contracts relating to the 



Num- 
ber 
of Con- 
tract. 



95i 



96i 



99i 



1001 



1011 



102 



103 



104 



2. 

WORK. 



425 tons of coal for Alewife 
Brook pumping station. 

6,600 tons of coal: — 
2,600 tons for Deer Island 

pumping station. 
3,000 tons for East Boston 

pumping station. 
1,000 tons for Charlestown 

pumping station. 

Section 67, New Mystic 
Sewer, North Metropoli- 
tan System in Medford 
and Winchester. 

Extension of screen-house at 
East Boston pumping sta- 
tion. 

Two sets of screens for the 
East Boston pumping sta- 
tion. 

Reconstruction of part of 
Section 30, North Metro- 
politan System in Cam- 
bridge. 



Section 70, New Mystic 
sewer, North Metropoli- 
tan System in Winchester. 



Section 68, New Mystic 
sewer, North Metropoli- 
tan System in Winchester. 



Num- 
ber 
of 

Bids. 



Amount op Bid. 



4. 

Next to 
Lowest. 



E.85 per 
ton. 



$4.18 per 

ton. 
$4.03 per 

ton. 
$4.08 per 

ton. 

$104,575 00 



4,782 00 



7,885 00 



9,195 00 



39,116 50 



77,748 20 



5. 

Lowest. 



1.60 per 
ton. 2 



S3. 98 per 

ton. 2 
$3.98 per 

ton. 2 
$3.98 per 

ton. 2 

$93,090 00 ' 



4,700 00 2 



5,842 00 2 



7,805 00 2 



37,555 00 2 



67,535 002 



Contractor. 



Locke Coal Co., Mai- 
den. 



Metropolitan Coal Co., 
Boston. 



Coleman Bros., Chel- 
sea. 



J. E. Locatelli & Co., 
Boston. 



New England Struc- 
tural Co., BostQn. 



Wm. J. Barry, Boston. 



Ross and Barbaro, 
Winchester. 



G. M. Bryne Co., Bos- 
ton. 



Contract completed. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



195 



Appendix No . 4 . 



the Year 1913 — Sewerage Works. 
North Metropolitan System. 



7. 

Date of Con- 
tract. 



8. 

Date of 

Completion 

of Work. 



S. 



Prices of Principal Items of Contracts 
made in 1913. 



10. 

Value of Work 

done 
Dec. 31, 1913. 



June 5, 1912 
June 5, 1912 



Oct. 15, 1912 

Dec. 26, 1912 

Feb. 1, 1913 

May 1, 1913 



April 9, 1913 



June 11, 1913 



July 1, 1913 
July 1, 1913 



June 4, 1913 



June 14, 1913 



Aug. 15, 1913 



Aug. 16, 1913 



For furnishing and delivering two sets of screens at 
the East Boston pumping station in condition 
for erection. 

For earth excavation and refilling in trench for 36- 
inch concrete sewer and 36-inch brick sewer $4.50 
per lin. ft.; for Portland cement brick masonry 
in manholes and special structures, $14 per cu. 
yd.; for Portland cement concrete masonry in 
trench, $9.50 per cu. yd.; for spruce piles in place 
in trench, $25 per lin. ft. 

For earth excavation and refilling in trench for 24- 
inch x 36-inch concrete sewer, $3.50 per lin. ft.; 
for Portland cement brick masonry in manholes 
and special structures, $16 per cu. yd.; for Port- 
land cement concrete in trench, $7.25 per cu. yd.; 
for spruce piles in place in trench, $0.60 per lin. 
ft.; for rock excavation in trench, $5 per cu. yd. 

For earth excavation and refilling in trench for 54- 
inch concrete sewer, $7.50 per lin. ft.; for earth 
excavation and refilling in trench and embank- 
ment for 48-inch concrete sewer, $6.50 per lin. ft.; 
for earth or rock excavation or both in tunnel for 
48-inch concrete sewer, $15 per lin. ft.; for earth 
excavation and refilling in trench for 18-inch, 15- 
inch, and 12-inch pipe drains, $1.75 per lin. ft.; 
for Portland cement brick masonry in shafts, 
manholes, catch-basins, and special structures, 
$16 per cu. yd.; for Portland cement concrete 
masonry in trench, retaining wall and special 
structures, $7.50 per cu. yd.; for Portland cement 
concrete masonry in tunnel, $9 per cu. yd.; for 
spruce piles in trench in place, $25 per lin. ft. 



$1,930 57 
26,366 88 



93,638 81 

4,700 00 
5,842 00 
7,754 56 



23,637 20 



64,030 21 



2 Contract based upon this bid. 



196 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 











• 


Contracts relating to the 




1. 

Num- 
ber 
of Con- 
tract. 


2. 

WORK. 


3. 

Num- 
ber 
of 

Bids. 


Amount of Bid. 


6. 




4. 

Next to 
Lowest. 


5. 

Lowest. 


Contractor. 


9 

10 
11 


105 

106 
107 


Section 48A, North Metro- 
politan System in Somer- 
ville and Medford. 

425 tons of coal for Alewife 
Brook pumping station. 

6,800 tons of coal: — 
2,700 tons for Deer Island 

pumping station. 
3,000 tons for East Boston 

pumping station. 
1,100 tons for Charlestown 

pumping station. 


8 

1 

1 
1 
1 


$2,101 40 


$1,876 752 

$5.15 per 
ton. 2 

$4.62 per 

ton. 2 
$4.54 per 

ton. 2 
$4.54 per 

ton. 2 


Antony Cefalo, Bos- 
ton. 

Locke Coal Company, 
Maiden. 

Metropolitan Coal Co., 
Boston. 



Contracts made and pending during 
Contracts relating to the 





1. 

Num- 
ber 
of Con- 
tract. 


2. 
WORK. 


3. 

Num- 
ber 
of 

Bids. 


Amount op Bid. 


6. 




4. 

Next to 
Lowest. 


5. 

Lowest. 


Contractor. 


1 

2 
3 

4 


97i 

98i 
108 

109 


2,700 tons of coal: — 
2,200 tons for Ward Street 

pumping station. 
500 tons for Nut Island 

screen-house. 

475 tons of coal for Quincy 
pumping station. 

2,650 tons of coal: — 
2,200 tons for Ward Street 

pumping station. 
450 tons for Nut Island 

screen-house. 

425 tons of coal for Quincy 
pumping station. 


3 
2 

2 

1 
1 

1 


$4.40 per 

ton. 
$4.37 per 

ton. 

$4.74 per 
ton. 


$4.31 per 
ton. 2 

$4.12 per 
ton. 2 

$4.65 per 
ton. 2 

$5.15 per 
ton. 2 

$4.78 per 
ton. 2 

$5.10 per 
ton. 2 


Metropolitan Coal 
Co., Boston. 

City Fuel Co., Boston. 

Metropolitan Coal Co., 
Boston. 

Frost Coal Company, 
Boston. 



Contract completed. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



197 



North Metropolitan System — Concluded. 



7. 

Date of Con- 
tract. 



8. 

Date of 

Completion 

of Work. 



9, 



Prices of Principal Items of Contracts 
made in 1913. 



10. 

Value of Work 

done 
Dec. 31, 1913. 



June 28, 1913 

June 23, 1913 
June 23, 1913 



Aug. 23, 1913 



For earth excavation and refilling in trench for 15- 
inch pipe sewer, $1.75 per lin. ft.; for Portland 
cement brick masonry in manholes, $15.50 per 
cu. yd.; for Portland cement concrete masonry 
in trench, $6.50 per cu. yd. 

$5.15 per ton of 2,240 lbs. delivered in bins at Ale" 5 - 
wife Brook pumping station. 

$4.62 per ton of 2,240 lbs. delivered in bins at Deer 

Island pumping station. 
$4.54 per ton of 2,240 lbs. delivered in bins at East 

Boston pumping station. 
$4.54 per ton of 2,240 lbs. delivered in bins at 

Charlestown pumping station. 



$1,397 53 

715 21 
13,721 80 



the Year 1913 — ■ Sewerage Works — Continued. 
South Metropolitan System. 



7. 

Date of Con- 
tract. 



8. 

Date of 

Completion 

of Work. 



9. 



Prices of Principal Items of Contracts 
made in 1913. 



10. 

Value of Work 

done 
Dec. 31, 1913. 



June 


5, 


1912 


June 


5, 


1912 


June 


23, 


1913 


June 


23, 


1913 



July 1, 1913 



5.15 per ton of 2,240 lbs. delivered in bins at Ward 

Street pumping station. 
t.78 per ton of 2,240 lbs. delivered on wharf at Nut 

Island screen-house. 



5.10 per ton of 2,240 lbs. delivered in bins at Quincy 
pumping station. 



$11,201 51 

2,146 61 
6,298 66 

299 17 



2 Contract based upon this bid. 



198 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Contracts made and pending during the Year 1913 ■ — Sewerage Works 

— Concluded. 

Summary of Contracts. 



Value of 

Work done Dec. 

31, 1913. 



North Metropolitan System, 11 contracts, . 

South Metropolitan System, 4 contracts, 

Total of 15 contracts made and pending during the year 1913, 



$243,734 77 
19,945 95 



$263,680 72 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 199 



Appendix No . 5 . 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT PRESENTED TO THE GENERAL COURT 

ON JANUARY 19, 1914. 

The Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board respectfully presents 
the following abstract of the account of its doings, receipts, expendi- 
tures, disbursements, assets and liabilities for the year ending 
November 30, 1913, in accordance with the provisions of chapter 
235 of the Acts of the year 1906. 

Metropolitan Water Works. 

Construction. 

The loans authorized for expenditures under the Metropolitan 
Water acts, the receipts which are added to the loan fund, the ex- 
penditures for the construction and acquisition of works, and the 
balance available on December 1, 1913, have been as follows: — 

Loans authorized under Metropolitan Water acts, . . . $42,798,000 00 
Receipt from town of Swampscott for admission to Metropolitan 

Water District, paid into Loan Fund (St. 1909, c. 320), . . 90,000 00 

Receipts from the sales of property which are placed to the credit 
of the Metropolitan Water Loan Fund : — ■ 
For the year ending November 30, 1913, . $4,622 46 
For the period prior to December 1, 1912, . 220,836 14 

■ 225,458 60 



Amount approved for payment by the Board out of the Metro- 
politan Water Loan Fund : — 
For the year ending November 30, 1913, . $206,551 87 
For the period prior to December 1, 1912, . 42,029,922 65 



$43,113,458 60 



42,236,474 52 
Balance, December 1, 1913, $876,984 08 

The amount of the Metropolitan Water Loan bonds issued at the 
end of the fiscal year was $41,788,000, no additional bonds having 
been issued during the year. Of the amount issued, $41,398,000 
were sinking fund bonds, and the remainder, amounting to $390,000, 
were issued as serial bonds. 



200 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

At the end of the year the amount of the outstanding bonds was 
$41,773,000, as bonds issued on the serial payment plan to the 
amount of $15,000 had been paid. During the fiscal year, $10,000 
in serial bonds has been paid. 

The Metropolitan Water Loan sinking fund amounted on De- 
cember 1, 1913, to $10,765,512.65, an increase during the year of 
$954,331.36. 

The net debt on December 1, 1913, was $31,007,487.35, a decrease 
during the fiscal year of $964,331.36. 

Maintenance. 

Amount appropriated for the maintenance and oper- 
ation of works, for the year ending November 30, 
1913, $447,000 00 

Balance of special appropriation for the improve- 
ment of the Cochituate watershed (1909-1911) 
remaining, 1,117 12 

Special appropriation for protection of water supply 

in aqueducts (1911) remaining, .... 14,921 21 

Special appropriation for protection and improve- 
ment of the water supply (1912), . . . . 20,000 00 

Receipts credited to this fund for year ending Novem- 
ber 30, 1913, 45,406 63 

$528,444 96 

Amount approved by Board for maintenance and op- 
eration of works during year ending November 30, 
1913, ' 426,705 40 

Balance, December 1, 1913, . .... . . . $101,73956 

This balance includes the sum of $14,921.21, the amount remain- 
ing unexpended of the special appropriation for the protection of the 
water supply in aqueducts, and the sums of $17,497.11, the amount 
remaining unexpended of the special appropriation in 1912, and 
$20,000, the special appropriation in 1913 for the protection and 
improvement of the water supply. 

The Board has also received during the year ending November 30, 
1913, $45,406.63 from rentals, the sale of land, land products and 
power and from other proceeds from the operations of the Board 
which, according to section 18 of the Metropolitan Water Act, are 
applied by the Treasurer of the Commonwealth to the payment of 
interest on the Metropolitan Water Loan, to sinking fund require- 
ments, and expenses of maintenance and operation of works, in re- 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 201 

duction of the amount to be assessed upon the Metropolitan Water 
District for the year. 

Sums received from sales of water to municipalities not belonging 
to the District and to water companies, and from municipalities 
for admission to the District, have been applied as follows : — 

For the period prior to December 1, 1906, distributed to the cities 
and towns of the District, as provided by section 3 of the Met- 
ropolitan Water Act, , . $219,865 65 

For the period beginning December 1, 1906, and prior to December 
1, 1912, applied to the Metropolitan Water Loan sinking fund, 
as provided by chapter 238 of the Acts of 1907, .... 41,601 63". 

For the year beginning December 1, 1912, and ending November 
30, 1913, applied to the Metropolitan Water Loan sinking fund, 
as provided by said last-named act, . . 4,570 83 

$266,038 11 
Metropolitan Sewerage Works. 
Construction. 

The loans authorized under the various acts of the Legislature 
for the construction of the Metropolitan Sewerage Works, the re- 
ceipts which are added to the proceeds of the loans, and the expendi- 
tures for construction, are given below, as follows : — 

North Metropolitan System. 
Loans authorized for expenditures for construction 
under the various acts, including those for the 
Revere, Belmont and Maiden extensions, North 
System enlargements and extensions, and new 
Mystic sewer, ........ $7,013,865 73 

Receipts from sales of real estate and from miscel- 
laneous sources, which are placed to the credit 
of the North Metropolitan System: — 

For the year ending November 30, 1913, . 9,995 08 

For the period prior to December 1, 1912, . 75,184 24 
Amount approved for payment by the Board x out 
of the Metropolitan Sewerage Loan Fund, North 
System : — 
For the year ending November 30, 1913, . $218,175 36 

For the period prior to December 1, 1912, . 6,726,457 45 

$7,099,045 05 $6,944,632 81 
Balance, December 1, 1913, $154,412 24 

1 The word "Board " refers to the Metropolitan Sewerage Commission and its successor the Metro- 
politan Water and Sewerage Board. 



202 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



South Metropolitan System. 
Loans authorized for expenditures for construction 
Under the various acts, applied to the construc- 
tion of the Charles River valley sewer, Neponset 
valley sewer, High-level sewer and extension, . $8,867,046 27 
Receipts for pumping, sales of real estate and from 
miscellaneous sources, which are placed to the 
credit of the South Metropolitan System : — 
For the year ending November 30, 1913, . 76 75 

For the period prior to December 1, 1912, . 14,004 60 
Amount approved by the Board for payment as 
follows : — 

On account of the Charles River valley sewer, $800,046 27 

On account of the Neponset valley sewer, .. 911,531 46 

On account of the High-level sewer and ex- 
tension : — 

For the year ending November 30, 1913, 1,082 63 

For the period prior to December 1, 1912, 7,108,911 32 



$8,881,127 62 $8,821,571 68 
Balance, December 1, 1913, $59,555 94 

The amount of the Metropolitan Sewerage Loan bonds issued at 
the end of the fiscal year was $15,880,912, bonds amounting to 
$378,000 having been issued during the year. Of the amount issued, 
$15,440,912 were sinking fund bonds, and the remainder, amounting 
to $440,000, were serial bonds. 

At the end of the year the amount of the outstanding bonds was. 
$15,877,912, as bonds issued on the serial payment plan to the 
amount of $3,000 had been paid during the year. 

Of the total amount outstanding at the end of the year, $7,000,000 
were issued for the North Metropolitan System and $8,877,912 for 
the South Metropolitan System. The Metropolitan Sewerage Loan 
sinking fund amounted on December 1, 1913, to $2,748,182.33, of which 
$1,755,553.90 was on account of the North Metropolitan System and 
$992,628.43 was on account of the South Metropolitan System. 

The net debt on December 1, 1913, was $13,129,729.67, an in- 
crease of $81,007.39. 

Included in the above figures for the North Metropolitan System 
is $62,000 in serial bonds issued under chapter 512 of the Acts of 
1911, of which $3,000 has been paid. 



o 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 20.' 



Maintenance. 

North Metropolitan System. 

Appropriated for the year ending November 30, 1913, . . . $170,600 00 
Receipts from pumping and from other sources which are returned 
to the appropriation: — 

For the year ending November 30, 1913, 604 59 

$171,204 59 
Amount approved for payment by the Board: — 

For the year ending November 30, 1913, ... . . . 162,333 66 

Balance, December 1, 1913, . $8,870 93 

South Metropolitan System. 

Appropriated for the year ending November 30, 1913, . . . $109,460 00 
Receipts from sales of property and for pumping, which are re- 
turned to the appropriation: — 
For the year ending November 30, 1913, 189 85 

$109,649 85 
Amount approved for payment by the Board: — 

For the year ending November 30, 1913, 100,910 79 

Balance, December 1, 1913, $8,739 06 



204 



METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



Appendix No . 6 . 



Legislation of the Year 1913 affecting the Metro- 
politan Water and Sewerage Board. 



The city of 
Quincy ex- 
empted from 
paying for 
water sold for 
certain pur- 
poses. 



Proviso. 



Acts of 1913. 

Chapter 154. 



An Act to authorize the city of quincy to sell water 
for mechanical or manufacturing uses on certain 

TERMS. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Section 1. The city of Quincy shall not be required to 
pay, and is hereby exempted from paying, to the treasurer 
of the commonwealth any money toward the interest, sink- 
ing fund requirements, and expenses of maintenance and 
operation of the metropolitan water system, or on any 
account whatsoever, for any water from its reservoir in the 
town of Braintree that it may sell or distribute in any 
year, exclusively for mechanical or manufacturing uses and 
purposes, and the water so sold shall not be considered by 
the metropolitan water and sewerage board in determining 
the amount of water consumed by said city during said 
year, which said board is required to certify to the treasurer 
of the commonwealth under the provisions of chapter four 
hundred and eighty-eight of the acts of the year eighteen 
hundred and ninety-five, as amended by chapter four hun- 
dred and fifty-seven of the acts of the year nineteen hun- 
dred and six, or by any other acts in amendment thereof 
or in addition thereto; and the city of Quincy is hereby 
exempted from any provision of any of said acts which 
may now authorize the treasurer of the commonwealth to 
assess it on account of water from its own supply which it 
may so sell or distribute: provided, however, that the metro- 
politan water and sewerage board certifies to the treasurer 
and receiver general of the commonwealth that the water 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 205 

sold and distributed under this act has been used for 
mechanical or manufacturing purposes only. 

Section 2. Any contract which the said city may make Provision in 

ooni'FQ.ots TOT* 

with a consumer for the sale of said water for mechanical sale of water. 
or manufacturing uses or purposes shall contain a provision 
that whenever the public authority having control of the 
water of said reservoir determines that there is occasion to 
use said water for public purposes, said authority may 
terminate such contract on giving to the consumer reason- 
able notice of its intention so to do. Whenever such a 
contract is so terminated, the consumer shall not be entitled 
to any compensation by way of damage or otherwise by 
reason thereof. Such a contract may be entered into in 
behalf of the city by the mayor and the commissioner of 
public works, and may be for a year or for a greater or less 
period of time, as they may think proper, and upon such 
further terms and conditions as they may determine that 
the interests of the city require, 

Section 3. This act shall not in any manner abridge any Not to affect 

.,,.,,. p/-\» 1 • certain rights. 

right which the city of Qumcy may now have concerning 
the disposal of said water, and the authority conferred by 
this act shall be in addition to the authority now possessed 
by it. 

Section 4. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 
[Approved February 24, 1913. 



Chapter 351. 

An Act making an appropriation for operating the 
south metropolitan system of sewage disposal. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Section 1. A sum not exceeding one hundred nine Appropriation 

m for mainte- 

thousand four hundred and sixty dollars is hereby appro- nance of south 

metropolitan 

priated, to be paid out of the South Metropolitan System sewerage works. 
Maintenance Fund, for the cost of maintenance and opera- 
tion of the south metropolitan system of sewage disposal, 
comprising a part of Boston, the cities of Newton and 
Waltham, and the towns of Brookline, Watertown, Dedham, 
and Milton, during the fiscal year ending on the thirtieth 
day of November, nineteen hundred and thirteen. 

Section 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 
[Approved March 26, 1913. 



206 



METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



Chapter 352. 

An Act making an appropriation for operating the 
north metropolitan system of sewage disposal. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 
fo? mamte- ion Section 1. A sum not exceeding one hundred seventy 
S5o°oiSa? h thousand six hundred dollars is hereby appropriated, to be 
sewerage works. p a id ou t f the North Metropolitan System Maintenance 
Fund, for the maintenance and operation of a system of 
sewage disposal for the cities included in what is known as 
the north metropolitan system, during the fiscal year end- 
ing on the thirtieth day of November, nineteen hundred and 
thirteen. 

Section 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 
[Approved March 26, 1913. 



Chapter 353. 

An Act making an appropriation for operating the 
metropolitan water system. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 
Appropriation Section 1. A sum not exceeding four hundred and forty- 

for mamte- . . . 

nance of metro- seven thousand dollars is hereby appropriated, to be paid 

pohtan water t • t* 1 

works. out of the Metropolitan Water Maintenance Fund, for the 

maintenance and operation of the metropolitan water 
system for the cities and towns in what is known as the 
metropolitan water district, during the fiscal year ending 
on the thirtieth day of November, nineteen hundred and 
thirteen. 

Section 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 
[Approved March 26, 1918. 



Chapter 377.- 

An Act to authorize the metropolitan water and 
sewerage board to construct an additional branch 
sewer in the city of somerville. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 
Construction Section 1. The metropolitan water and sewerage board 
sewer in Somer- j s hereby authorized to construct an additional branch 

ville author- ^ 

ized - sewer through a part of the city of Somerville, in order to 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 207 

dispose of sewage coming from the city of Medford, and 
for this purpose the said board is hereby authorized to 
expend any balance of the proceeds of bonds already 
issued on account of the Metropolitan Sewerage Loan 
Fund, for the benefit of the north metropolitan sewerage 
district, which may be in excess of the amount required 
for satisfying the purposes for which said bonds were 
issued. 

Section 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 
[Approved March 28, 1913. 



Chapter 422. 

An Act relative to allowances to cities and towns 
in the metropolitan water district for water 
furnished from their own sources. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Section 1. Any city or town belonging to the metro- Allowance for 
politan water district, established under the provisions of nished by 
chapter four hundred and eighty-eight of the acts of the towns in metro- 

. ■■ . 1 ,, -, . . n ■,.-,. . politan water 

year eighteen hundred and ninety-nve, which is assessed district from 
upon its total valuation, or which shall be admitted to the sources. 
district under said chapter or any subsequent act of the 
general court, and which shall agree with the metropolitan 
water and sewerage board to furnish from its own works 
a constant and fixed quantity of water of proper quality 
for a term of five or more years, as a part of its own water 
supply, such quantity to be not greater than the safe 
capacity of its sources in a dry year as determined by said 
board, shall be allowed and credited in its apportionment 
with such sum for every million gallons furnished in ac- 
cordance with the agreement so made, as shall be deter- 
mined in each year by the said board and certified by it 
to the treasurer of the commonwealth: provided, however, 
that the said sum shall not be less than twenty-four dollars 
per million gallons and shall not exceed the average cost 
to the metropolitan water district of water furnished from 
the metropolitan water supply during the year preceding 
that in which the assessment is made. 

Section 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 
[Approved March 31, 1913. 



208 



METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



Chapter 525. 

An Act relative to the rate of interest on damages 
in the case of real estate taken or injured 
by the metropolitan park commission or the 
metropolitan water and sewerage board. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 
Rate of interest Section 1. In a suit to determine damages for the 

on damages for i • » i • • i • 

real estate taking of and injury to real estate taken or injured, after 

taken by 

metropolitan the passage of this act, by the metropolitan park corn- 
park commis- . 
sion and metro- mission or by the metropolitan water and sewerage board 

politan water 

and sewerage under authority of any law or statute, the damages so de- 
board. . . 

termmed shall bear interest at the rate of five per cent 

per annum from the date when damages are to be as- 
sessed under the law or statute by virtue of which such 
real estate was taken or injured. 

Section 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 
[Approved April 21, 1913. 



1910, 268, § 1, 
etc., amended. 



Chapter 534. 

An Act relative to the preparation and printing of 
lists of state officials and employees with their 
salaries or compensation. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Section 1. Section one of chapter two hundred and 
sixty-eight of the acts of the year nineteen hundred and 
ten, as amended by chapter forty-three of the acts of the 
year nineteen hundred and eleven, is hereby further 
amended by striking out after the word "amount", in 
the sixteenth line, the words "of all money paid for serv- 
ices or salaries to any official or employee, not otherwise", 
and inserting in place thereof the words: — of money paid 
for services or salaries to officials or employees not em- 
ployed on the first day of July preceding and therefore 
not, — and by striking out all after the word "year", 
in the next to the last line, and inserting in place thereof 
the words: — and for the two preceding years, — so as 
andempSyU to read as follows: — Section 1. Every department, com- 
to governor 11601 mission, bureau or board of the commonwealth, shall, on 
and council, Qr k e f ore t h e fifteenth day of July in the year nineteen 



List of officials 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 209 

hundred and ten, and on or before the fifteenth day of 
July in every year thereafter, prepare and furnish to the 
governor and council lists of all the officials and em- 
ployees of the commonwealth employed in or by such 
department, commission, bureau or board on the first day 
of July preceding, for whose services money has been paid 
from the treasury of the commonwealth. The said lists 
shall be arranged by divisions of the several departments, 
commissions, bureaus or boards, when such divisions exist, 
and shall give the name, residence, designation, rate of 
compensation and the date of election or appointment of 
every such official and employee, and any increase in the 
rate of salary or compensation for the year preceding; 
and also the aggregate amount of money paid for services 
or salaries to officials or employees not employed on the 
first day of July preceding and therefore not shown upon 
the list, for the year beginning with the first day of July 
in the year preceding that in which the list is prepared. 
It shall be the duty of the auditor of the commonwealth to Auditor to 

.„, -it i • li • i verify lists. 

verity the said lists, the compensation and the said aggre- 
gate amounts from the pay roll. The said lists and aggre- To be printed 
gate amounts shall be printed at the expense of the com- ment, etc. 
monwealth as a document of the commonwealth, before the 
first day of October in the year in which they are furnished, 
and the said document shall contain a summary by de- 
partments, commissions, bureaus and boards of the total 
number of officials and employees employed in or by every 
such department, commission, bureau and board and the 
total amount paid for services by every such department, 
commission, bureau and board from the treasury of the 
commonwealth, and, respectively, the whole number of 
such officials and employees, and the whole amount paid 
for services in a grand total; and a summary by every such 
department, commission, bureau and board of the total 
number of such officials and employees and the total 
amount paid for services for the year and for the two 
preceding years. 

Section 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 
[Approved April 22, 1913. 



210 



METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



Town of Ar- 
lington ex- 
empted from 
paying for 
water sold by- 
it for certain 
purposes. 



Proviso. 



Provision in 
contracts for 
sale of water. 



Chapter 537. 

An Act to authorize the town of Arlington to sell 
water for mechanical and agricultural purposes. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Section 1. The town of Arlington shall not be re- 
quired to pay, and is hereby exempted from paying, to 
the treasurer of the commonwealth any money toward the 
interest, sinking fund requirements and expenses of main- 
tenance and operation of the metropolitan water system, 
or on any account whatsoever, for any water from its 
reservoir in the towns of Arlington and Lexington which 
it may sell or distribute in any year exclusively for me- 
chanical, manufacturing or agricultural purposes, and the 
water so sold shall not be considered by the metropolitan 
water and sewerage board in determining the amount of 
water consumed by said town during said year, which said 
board is required to certify to the treasurer of the com- 
monwealth under the provisions of chapter four hundred 
and eighty-eight of the acts of the year eighteen hundred 
and ninety-five, as amended by chapter four hundred and 
fifty-seven of the acts of the year nineteen hundred and 
six, or by any other acts in amendment thereof or in 
addition thereto, and the town of Arlington is hereby 
exempted from any provision of either of said acts which 
authorizes the treasurer of the commonwealth to assess it 
on account of water from its own supply which it may so 
sell or distribute: provided, however, that the metropolitan 
water and sewerage board certifies to the treasurer and 
receiver general of the commonwealth that the water sold 
and distributed under authority of this act has been used 
for mechanical, manufacturing or agricultural purposes 
only. 

Section 2. Any contract which the said town may make 
with a consumer for the sale of water from said reservoir 
for mechanical, manufacturing or agricultural purposes, 
shall contain a provision that whenever the public author- 
ity having control of the water of said reservoir determines 
that there is occasion to use said water for public pur- 
poses, said authority may terminate such contract on giving 
to the consumer reasonable notice of its intention so to do. 
Whenever such a contract is so terminated, the consumer 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 211 

shall not be entitled to any compensation by way of damage 
or otherwise by reason thereof. Such a contract may be 
entered into in behalf of the town by the board of public 
works, and may be for a year or for a greater or less period 
of time, as the board may think proper, and upon such 
further terms and conditions as it may determine that the 
interests of the town require. 

Section 3. This act shall not abridge any right which Not to affect 
the town of Arlington may have concerning the disposal of of the town. 
said water, and the authority conferred by this act shall be 
in addition to the authority now possessed by the town. 

Section 4. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 
[Approved April 23, 1913. 



Chapter 558. 

An Act relative to the drainage of medford street 
in the city of somerville. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Section 1. In the abolition of the railroad grade cross- Drainage of 
ing at Medford street in Somerville now being made under in the city of 
a decree of the superior court, there shall be provided as a 
part of the work of construction such method for removing 
all surface and storm water from the new low grade of the 
street into the drainage system of the city of Somerville as 
may be approved by the metropolitan water and sewerage 
board, instead of the connection with the metropolitan 
sewerage system as required by the decree, and the ex- 
pense shall be treated as one of the expenses of the aboli- 
tion of the crossing. 

Section 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 
[Approved April 26, 1913. 



Chapter 685. 

An Act relative to wages of employees of the metro- 
politan PARK COMMISSION AND OF THE METROPOLITAN 
WATER AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Section 1. Section one of chapter five hundred and 1011,541, § 1. 

* t amended. 

forty-one of the acts of the year nineteen hundred and 
eleven is hereby amended by striking out the word " twenty- 



212 



METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



Wages of 
certain em- 
ployees estab- 
lished. 



five", in the fourth line, and inserting in place thereof the 
word: — fifty, — so as to read as follows: — Section 1. 
The wages paid by the metropolitan park commission and 
by the metropolitan water and sewerage board to laborers 
directly employed by them shall be not less than two 
dollars and fifty cents a day. 

Section 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 

(This bill, returned by the governor to the senate, the 
branch in which it originated, with his objections thereto, was 
passed by the senate, May 13, and, in concurrence, by the 
house of representatives, May 19, the objections of the governor 
notwithstanding, in the manner prescribed by the Constitution; 
and thereby has the "force of a law".) 



Lowering of 
metropolitan 
water mains in 
Chelsea creek 
authorized. 



Issue of bonds 
authorized. 



Chapter 755. 

An Act to authorize the lowering of the metro- 
politan WATER MAINS IN CHELSEA CREEK. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Section 1. The metropolitan water and sewerage board 
is hereby authorized to lower the metropolitan water mains 
in Chelsea creek to a sufficient depth to permit the carrying 
out of the improvements in said creek provided for by an 
act of the congress of the United States passed in the year 
nineteen hundred and twelve, and may sink shafts, con- 
struct a tunnel and do any other act or thing necessary to 
comply with the requirements of said act. 

Section 2. To meet the expenditures incurred under the 
provisions of this act the treasurer and receiver general shall 
issue from time to time, upon the request of said board, 
bonds in the name and behalf of the commonwealth, to be 
designated on the face thereof, Metropolitan Water Loan, 
to an amount not exceeding seventy-five thousand dollars 
in addition to the amount of such bonds heretofore author- 
ized under the provisions of chapter four hundred and 
eighty-eight of the acts of the year eighteen hundred and 
ninety-five and acts in amendment thereof and in addition 
thereto, and the provisions of said chapter four hundred 
and eighty-eight and of said acts shall apply to this addi- 
tional loan. 

Section 3. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 
[Approved June 6, 1913. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 213 

Chapter 769. 

An Act to authokize the city of newton to provide 
for the disposal of sewage from the riverside 
recreation grounds. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Section 1. The city of Newton may permit the entrance Disposal of 
into the sewers of that city of the sewage of the Riverside Riverside 
Recreation Grounds, so called, situated on the westerly grounds. 
side of Charles river in the town of Weston, so long as the 
said grounds shall be occupied by the trustees of the River- 
side Recreation Grounds, or their successors, upon such 
terms, agreements and stipulations as may be agreed upon 
by said city and said trustees, and all sewage so received 
may be discharged into the south metropolitan sewerage 
system : provided, however, that such terms, agreements and Proviso - 
stipulations shall have been approved by the metropolitan 
water and sewerage board, and that such further provisions 
as the said board shall deem necessary have been complied 
with. 

Section 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 
[Approved June 13, 1913. 



Chapter 814. 

An Act to provide for the improvement of beaver 
dam brook in the towns of ashland, framingham, 
sherborn and natick. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Section 1. The metropolitan water and sewerage board improvement 

r ° of Beaver Dam 

is authorized to widen, straighten and deepen the channel ^ rook author- 
of Beaver Dam brook in the towns of Ashland, Framing- 
ham, Sherborn and Natick, and otherwise to improve said 
brook from Waushakum pond in the towns of Ashland and 
Framingham to the outlet of said brook at Lake Cochitu- 
ate in the town of Natick. 

Section 2. The said board, for the purposes aforesaid, £nds ri eto° n ° f 
may take, or acquire by purchase or otherwise, lands, recorded be 
easements, rights of way, water rights and other property, 
and shall sign and cause to be recorded in the registry of 
deeds for the county and district in which the property to 



214 



METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



Damages. 



Issue of bonds 
authorized. 



Assessment of 

betterments, 

etc. 



be taken is situated a description thereof as certain as is 
required in a common conveyance of land, and stating that 
the same is taken for the metropolitan water works; and 
upon such recording the property so described shall vest 
in the commonwealth. 

Section 3. Any person whose property is injured by 
the taking or by the widening, straightening or deepening 
of said brook, or by any other act of the said board under 
the provisions of this act, and who has not released to the 
commonwealth all claims for damages on account of the 
same, may have his damages determined by the award 
of, or by agreement with, the said board; and if the 
parties cannot agree upon the damages, the damages may 
be determined by a jury of the superior court for the 
county of Middlesex under the provisions of chapter forty- 
eight of the Revised Laws, so far as they may be applicable, 
upon a petition therefor filed by the person aggrieved in 
the office of the clerk within one year after the damage is 
sustained, and the petitioner shall have judgment for the 
amount determined, with interest on the excess of the 
amount over the award of the board, and costs if the 
amount is greater than the award of the said board; other- 
wise the petitioner shall recover no interest and shall pay 
costs. 

Section 4. The expense incurred in carrying out the 
provisions of this act shall be paid out of the treasury of 
the commonwealth, and the treasurer and receiver general 
shall, from time to time, on the request of the said board, 
issue negotiable bonds in the name and in behalf of the 
commonwealth and under its seal, designated on the face 
thereof, Metropolitan Water Loan, to an amount not ex- 
ceeding thirty-three thousand dollars; and the provisions 
of chapter four hundred and eighty-eight of the acts of the 
year eighteen hundred and ninety-five and acts in amend- 
ment thereof and in addition thereto shall, so far as the 
same are applicable, apply to said loan. 

Section 5. The metropolitan water and sewerage board 
shall, within one year after the completion of the work 
hereby authorized, if in its opinion any land receives a 
benefit from the improvements beyond the general benefit 
to all land in said towns, and if the owner has not released 
to the commonwealth all claims for damages on account 
of any act or thing done by said board, its agents, or 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 215 

servants in carrying out the provisions of this act, de- 
termine the value of and assess upon the land receiving 
such benefit a proportional share of the cost of the said 
improvements, not exceeding the value of the benefit; 
and any person whose land is so assessed may have the 
amount of the assessment determined by a jury of the 
superior court for the county of Middlesex, under the pro- 
visions of chapter fifty of the Revised Laws, so far as 
they may be applicable, but without interest or costs if 
the assessment by the jury is less than the amount deter- 
mined by the said board. The assessment so determined 
by the said board or by a jury, as the case may be, shall 
constitute a lien upon the land until it is paid. Every 
such assessment shall be certified by the secretary of said 
board or by the clerk of said court to the collector of the 
town in which the land lies, and shall be collected by him 
in the manner provided for the collection of taxes, and the 
proceeds thereof shall be paid into the treasury of the 
commonwealth and be applied by the treasurer toward 
payment of the expense incurred in making the said im- 
provements. 

Section 6. The town of Framingham shall permit dwell- Buildings near 
ing houses and other buildings situated near said brook in connecSdTwith 
the towns of Ashland, Natick or Sherborn, to be con- ofTrammg- wn 
nected with the sewers of the town of Framingham, upon am * 
payment of such entrance fees as the town of Framingham 
may determine, and subject to such reasonable regulations 
and sewer rentals relative thereto as may be adopted and 
established by the town of Framingham. 

Section 7. One third of the expense incurred as afore- Expense to be 

• i i ii i i i «ii l -r\ • i shared by 

said shall be borne and paid by the town of Framingham, town of Fram- 

i* i • i i ii • • ■ • i ingham. 

and the said town shall from time to time pay into the 
treasury of the commonwealth, within three months after 
notice from the treasurer of the commonwealth, such sums 
as may be necessary to reimburse the commonwealth for 
its share of the expense incurred as aforesaid, and the sum 
so paid by the town shall be applied by the treasurer 
toward the payment of the said expense. 

Section 8. The town of Framingham may appropriate Town of Fram- 

. ° i • j i ingham Beaver 

money lor the purpose ot paying the amount to be paid by Dam Brook 

• i • r» iiii Loan, Act of 

said town into the treasury of the commonwealth under the 1913. 
provisions of this act, and for that purpose the town is 
hereby authorized, from time to time, to borrow money 



216 



METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



Payment of 
loan. 



beyond its statutory limit of indebtedness to an amount 
not exceeding twelve thousand dollars, and to issue notes 
or bonds therefor. Such notes or bonds shall bear on the 
face thereof the words, Town of Framingham Beaver Dam 
Brook Loan, Act of 1913, and also the words, Exempt from 
Taxation in Massachusetts, shall be payable by such annual 
payments beginning not more than one year after the date 
thereof as will extinguish each loan within twelve years 
from its date; and the amount of such annual payment of 
any loan in any year shall not be less than the amount of 
the principal of such loan payable in any subsequent year. 
Each authorized issue of notes or bonds shall constitute 
a separate loan. Said notes or bonds shall bear interest, 
payable semi-annually, at a rate not exceeding five per 
cent per annum, and shall be signed by the treasurer and 
countersigned by the selectmen of the town. The town 
may sell the said securities at public or private sale, upon 
such terms and conditions as it may deem expedient, but 
they shall not be sold for less than their par value. 

Section 9. The town shall, at the time of authorizing 
the said loan, provide for the payment thereof in accord- 
ance with the provisions of the preceding section; and 
when a vote to that effect has been passed the amount 
required thereby shall, without further vote, be assessed by 
the assessors of the town annually thereafter, in the same 
manner in which other taxes are assessed, until the debt 
incurred by the loan is extinguished. The said town shall 
also raise annually by taxation a sum which will be suffi- 
cient to pay the interest as it accrues on the notes or bonds 
issued under authority of this act. 

Section 10. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 
[Approved June 16, 1913. 



Chapter 83. 

Resolve to provide for an examination relative to 
the disposal of sewage in the south metropolitan 
sewerage district and to the extension of said 
district. 

Examination Resolved, That the state board of health is hereby au- 

relative to dis- m 

posai of sewage thorized and directed to re-examine the general subject or 

for the south 

metropolitan the disposal of sewage for the south metropolitan sewerage 

cl is trie % • 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 217 

district, and particularly to consider whether any extension 
of said district is desirable, and to make report thereon to 
the general court. For this purpose said board may employ 
such engineering and other assistants as may be necessary 
to carry out the purposes of this resolve. All bills for ex- 
penses incurred under the provisions of this resolve shall be 
approved by the governor and council before they are sent 
to the auditor for payment, and in no event shall the ex- 
pense exceed the sum of twenty-five hundred dollars. The 
report herein required shall be made to the general court 
on or before the fifteenth day of January in the year nine- 
teen hundred and fourteen. [Approved May 8, 1913. 



Chapter 100. 

Resolve to provide for an investigation and a report 
on the improvement of spot pond brook in stone- 
ham, melrose and malden. 
Resolved, That the chairman of the metropolitan water Spot Pond 

and sewerage board, the chairman of the metropolitan park provement 

. . .ii- P ,i j • • p Commission, 

commission, the chairman ot the county commissioners ot duties, etc. 
the county of Middlesex, the mayor of the city of Maiden 
and the mayor of the city of Melrose are hereby consti- 
tuted a commission, to be known as the Spot Pond Brook 
Improvement Commission. The said commission shall 
investigate the condition of Spot Pond brook in Stoneham, 
Melrose and Maiden and report to the general court, before 
the tenth day of January, nineteen hundred and fourteen, 
a plan for the most economical means of preventing flooding 
along the course of said brook, together with such sugges- 
tions and recommendations relative to the improvement of 
the brook and the drainage of the territory through which 
it flows as the commission may deem advisable. [Approved 
May 29, 1913. 



Index to Legislation of the Year 1913 



AFFECTING THE 



METROPOLITAN WATER AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



A. 

APPROPRIATIONS. 

for improvement of Beaver Dam Brook, 
for lowering Metropolitan Water mains in Chelsea Creek, 
for maintenance of Metropolitan Water System, . 
for maintenance of North Metropolitan Sewerage System, 
for maintenance of South Metropolitan Sewerage System, 
ARLINGTON. 

town of, may sell water for mechanical and agricultural purposes, 



Chap. 
. 814 


Sect. 
4 


. 755 


2 


. 353 

. 352 

. . . 351 


1 
1 

1 



537 



B. 
BEAVER DAM BROOK. 

Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board authorized to improve, 



814 



C. 

CHELSEA CREEK. 

Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board authorized to lower water 
mains in, . . . . . . . . . 755 



E. 
EMPLOYEES, STATE. 

publication of lists of, law relative to, amended, . 



534 



I. 

INTEREST. 

rate to be paid for real estate taken or injured by Metropolitan Water and 
Sewerage Board fixed, . . . . . . . . . 525 

L. 
LABORERS. 

in employ of Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board, minimum wage of, G85 



M. 

METROPOLITAN WATER LOAN BONDS. 

issue of, authorized for improvement of Beaver Dam Brook, . . . 814 4 

issue of, authorized for lowering Metropolitan water mains in Chelsea 

Creek 755 2 

METROPOLITAN WATER AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 

may construct additional branch sewer in Somerville, .... 377 1 

may improve Beaver Dam Brook, ....... 814 1 

may lower water mains in Chelsea Creek, ...... 755 1 

relative to rate of interest on damages for real estate taken or injured by, 525 1 



220 INDEX. 

Chap. Sect. 
METROPOLITAN WATER DISTRICT. 

relative to allowances to cities and towns in, for water furnished from 

their own sources, ......... 422 1 

METROPOLITAN WATER SYSTEM. 

appropriation for maintenance of, . . . . . . 353 1 

N. 
NEWTON. 

may permit entrance of sewage from Riverside Recreation Grounds into 

sewer of, ... . . . ' . . . . . 769 1 

NORTH METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE SYSTEM. 

appropriation for maintenance of , . . . . . . . 352 1 

Q. 
QUINCY. 

may sell water for mechanical and manufacturing uses, . . .154 1 

R. 

RIVERSIDE RECREATION GROUNDS. 

sewage from, may be disposed of through Newton sewers, . . . 769 1 

S. 
SOMERVILLE. 

Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board may construct additional 

sewer in, . . . . . . . . . . 377 1 

relative to drainage of Medford Street in, . . . . . . 558 1 

SOUTH METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE DISTRICT. 

examination relative to disposal of sewage from and extension of said 

District, .......... Res. 83 - 

SOUTH METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE SYSTEM. 

appropriation for maintenance of, . . . . . . 351 . 1 

SPOT POND BROOK. 

to provide for investigation and report on improvement of, . . Res. 100 - 

W. 
WATER. 

relative to allowances for, to cities and towns in Metropolitan Water 

District furnished from their own sources, . . . . . 422 1